25 Things I Hate About Facebook

I have been tempted to deactivate my Facebook account for some time. In this short YouTube video, Julian Smith comically explains his frustrations. I concur with all twenty-five of his reasons.

I was ready to deactivate my Facebook account last week. Then I heard Chris Brogan at O’Reilly’s Tools of Change Conference. He put forth a model that I really liked.

To paraphrase, he said that your blog is your “homebase.” This is where you ultimately direct people. On the other hand, services like Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, etc. are “outposts.” The purpose of an outpost is to connect with people that otherwise wouldn’t find your homebase.

This makes sense to me. At least several times a week, I get Facebook messages from people who say, “I stumbled across your blog on Facebook.” So, for now, I guess I will keep my account open. Personally, I find Twitter so much easier to use and more rewarding—and certainly less annoying.

Question: What do you think of Facebook? What do you like? What annoys you? You can leave a comment by clicking here.
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  • http://idesofmay.com/ Patti May

    Facebook is a site I visit occasionally, usually to see what people I care to keep up with are doing. That would be the people who aren’t (yet) on Twitter. Otherwise I find Facebook a great way to waste time I don’t have. Definitely relate to Julian Smith’s 25. I like Brogan’s outlook, thanks for sharing that.

  • http://tatumweb.com/blog/ Rich Tatum

    Interesting.

    I’ve found that FaceBook, Twitter, LinkedIN, and Flickr (my main four social networking sites) all allow non-intrusive, low-threshold ways to use tech to maintain “high-touch” relationships without being able to be physically present for people.

    This his many-to-many technology, while apparently shallow with all the pokes, favorites, loose affiliations, gossip, and low-signal/high noise, still allows for one-to-one intensity. Further, having a profile and posting tweets, statuses, new pix, etc., invites response without demanding it. Not responding is guilt-free, but responses are totally gratis and are part of giving of one’s self. This allows me, as content creator, to remain open to new relationships that I would never have gotten initiated before, and as a consumer of content, it give me permission to generate relationships I could never have found before.

    Finally, I’m sure you’ve experienced this, the nature of Twitter and Facebook is such that it encourages a semi-dangerous transparency. This is both good and bad: Good for those with wisdom and level-heads. Bad for the immature and too-frank. I know that I would tweet/update things I would never put in an email and broadcast — or blog — which is not always bad. The ephemeral nature of these services encourage frivolity, but not all is frivolous. Some is quite serious.

    This comment, for instance, came about totally because i saw your tweet.

    Rich
    BlogRodent

  • http://www.colleencoble.com Colleen Coble

    I actually really like Facebook since I started Twittering. I have my tweets directed to Facebook, then I hear from tons of readers who are on Facebook but not on Twitter. Plus Twitter is so fleeting. People might or might not see a tweet, but they’ll notice it on Facebook.

    The annoyances of Facebook are the causes and little gift and best girl stuff. All those applications. I’m not interested in those and just ignore all them. But I’m annoyed I have to click Ignore for them and wish there was a way to opt out of any applications unless I specifically install them.

    Loved hearing what you learned at the conference! I’ll remember that blog as home base thing.

  • http://www.john-gallagher.blogspot.com John Gallagher

    I found Facebook before prior to knowing about Twitter. I primarily end up using Facebook to stay in touch with friends and family and post a few things about business. Twitter is more targeted at business networking for me, as is LInkedIn. I also have a plaxo account. The challenge I found was the status updates in each, so I found http://www.ping.fm, which allows you to set one status and update all your social networking, some of your social networking, or one of your social networks by ‘pinging’ your micro blog. It will also shrink your url like tinyurl.com to help keep your mico-blogs under 140. This has made it easier to keep up. Maybe you have other suggestions?

  • http://www.lawrencewilson.com Lawrence W. Wilson

    I have a difficult time determining which is more intrusive–Facebook or Twitter. I’m now getting junk DMs on Twitter, which so misses the point of social networking.

    @lawrencewilson

  • http://idesofmay.com/ Patti May

    Facebook is a site I visit occasionally, usually to see what people I care to keep up with are doing. That would be the people who aren't (yet) on Twitter. Otherwise I find Facebook a great way to waste time I don't have. Definitely relate to Julian Smith's 25. I like Brogan's outlook, thanks for sharing that.

    • http://www.best-registrycleaner.net Best Registry Cleaner

      I enjoyed the video and agree with a lot of it.

  • http://tatumweb.com/blog/ Rich Tatum

    Interesting.

    I've found that FaceBook, Twitter, LinkedIN, and Flickr (my main four social networking sites) all allow non-intrusive, low-threshold ways to use tech to maintain "high-touch" relationships without being able to be physically present for people.

    This his many-to-many technology, while apparently shallow with all the pokes, favorites, loose affiliations, gossip, and low-signal/high noise, still allows for one-to-one intensity. Further, having a profile and posting tweets, statuses, new pix, etc., invites response without demanding it. Not responding is guilt-free, but responses are totally gratis and are part of giving of one's self. This allows me, as content creator, to remain open to new relationships that I would never have gotten initiated before, and as a consumer of content, it give me permission to generate relationships I could never have found before.

    Finally, I'm sure you've experienced this, the nature of Twitter and Facebook is such that it encourages a semi-dangerous transparency. This is both good and bad: Good for those with wisdom and level-heads. Bad for the immature and too-frank. I know that I would tweet/update things I would never put in an email and broadcast — or blog — which is not always bad. The ephemeral nature of these services encourage frivolity, but not all is frivolous. Some is quite serious.

    This comment, for instance, came about totally because i saw your tweet.

    Rich

    BlogRodent

    • richpolanco

      Excellent insight, Rich! Valid today as well.

      -Rich

  • http://www.colleencoble.com/ Colleen Coble

    I actually really like Facebook since I started Twittering. I have my tweets directed to Facebook, then I hear from tons of readers who are on Facebook but not on Twitter. Plus Twitter is so fleeting. People might or might not see a tweet, but they'll notice it on Facebook.

    The annoyances of Facebook are the causes and little gift and best girl stuff. All those applications. I'm not interested in those and just ignore all them. But I'm annoyed I have to click Ignore for them and wish there was a way to opt out of any applications unless I specifically install them.

    Loved hearing what you learned at the conference! I'll remember that blog as home base thing.

  • http://www.john-gallagher.blogspot.com/ John Gallagher

    I found Facebook before prior to knowing about Twitter. I primarily end up using Facebook to stay in touch with friends and family and post a few things about business. Twitter is more targeted at business networking for me, as is LInkedIn. I also have a plaxo account. The challenge I found was the status updates in each, so I found http://www.ping.fm, which allows you to set one status and update all your social networking, some of your social networking, or one of your social networks by 'pinging' your micro blog. It will also shrink your url like tinyurl.com to help keep your mico-blogs under 140. This has made it easier to keep up. Maybe you have other suggestions?

  • http://www.michaelhyatt.com/ Michael Hyatt

    @Lawrence, people cannot DM you unless you are following them. You can just unfollow them. They will no longer be able to spam you.

  • http://larrywright.me Larry Wright

    My biggest annoyance with Facebook is the signal to noise ratio. There’s no way to filter out updates from specific applications. As a result, my Facebook page ends up filled with nonsense about people taking quizzes, throwing snowballs, etc. On the plus side of Facebook, it’s allowed me to reconnect with a lot of people that I wouldn’t have otherwise. I enjoy Twitter, I tolerate Facebook.

    • Beatrice

      I agree. Through facebook I have been able to connect with friends that I have lost contact with over the years. I don't log on that often because of all the nonsense, but if I'd like to check on a friend I can just go to their page and see if they have posted anything lately. __I wish my family in Sweden (I am in the US) would get on twitter so I could keep up with them easier.

    • Cassi

      Just click on Hide – that way you never see that App again on your wall. Simple.

  • http://www.mineandthine.com Chris Dattilo

    Michael, How do people find your blog on Facebook? I have a blog – it’s part of the blog network. But I’ve never stumbled across other blogs on Facebook.
    Do mean they are already your friend and see it listed on your wall or profile?

  • http://www.lawrencewilson.com/ Lawrence W. Wilson

    I have a difficult time determining which is more intrusive–Facebook or Twitter. I'm now getting junk DMs on Twitter, which so misses the point of social networking.

    @lawrencewilson

  • http://faithfictionfunandfanciful.blogspot.com/ Lynn Squire

    I joined Twitter before I joined Facebook. I joined Twitter because you recommended it :)

    I joined Facebook because many of my friends from church and family from Canada and across the States were on it but not on Twitter (and would likely never join Twitter). With the exception of a few people (such as yourself – that because I pray for you and these other people), I’ve kept the purposes of these two services separate. Facebook is more for my personal life and Twitter more for my “professional” life. This works for me. I like Facebook because I can put up pictures, view pictures of friends and family I don’t get to see as often, and catch up with those I’d otherwise only communicate with once a year. Interestingly enough, people who I could email, but don’t, I’ve instant messaged via Facebook or communicated wall-to-wall. Can’t do that with Twitter as easily.

    On the other hand, Twitter is too public a forum for those type of contacts, but it suits my publicity needs on a “professional” basis.

  • http://www.michaelhyatt.com/ Michael Hyatt

    @Lawrence, people cannot DM you unless you are following them. You can just unfollow them. They will no longer be able to spam you.

  • http://larrywright.me/ Larry Wright

    My biggest annoyance with Facebook is the signal to noise ratio. There's no way to filter out updates from specific applications. As a result, my Facebook page ends up filled with nonsense about people taking quizzes, throwing snowballs, etc. On the plus side of Facebook, it's allowed me to reconnect with a lot of people that I wouldn't have otherwise. I enjoy Twitter, I tolerate Facebook.

    • Beatrice

      I agree. Through facebook I have been able to connect with friends that I have lost contact with over the years. I don't log on that often because of all the nonsense, but if I'd like to check on a friend I can just go to their page and see if they have posted anything lately. __I wish my family in Sweden (I am in the US) would get on twitter so I could keep up with them easier.

    • Cassi

      Just click on Hide – that way you never see that App again on your wall. Simple.

  • http://cba-ramblings.blogspot.com Rachelle

    I feel so much better now! I thought I was the only Facebook hater. I don’t join groups, I don’t go to “Events,” I don’t write on walls, I don’t send Flair… aarrgghh. But it does help to think of it as one more way to point people to my blog. Thanks for the Monday morning laugh and the new way to think about FB.

  • http://www.karenrobbins.com Karen Robbins

    I enjoyed the video and agree with a lot of it. I take exception to the “Old people on FB.” I am one–I think–yup, pretty sure at his age he’d qualify me. I like FB combined with Twitter. Like others have said, there are people I have as friends that would never use Twitter and FB helps me keep in touch. We recently changed churches and so I can still keep in touch with old friends. I also found a long-lost cousin. And another old friend who moved away years ago, suddenly discovered that I am a speaker and writer. I truly think that some of the work I did with FB helped spread the word about my recent book.

    I do get frustrated with having to click ignore a lot but I found that getting rid of many of the apps cut down on some of it. I vow never to throw another cyber snowball.

  • Monica Hensley

    I enjoyed the video and agree with most of it. However the good I have found in FB is greater than the annoying things. I have re-connected with people I would never have found otherwise and have even met some new people so worth the annoying requests – I just ignore them =) Many of my family live out of town so great way to stay connected through the year =)

  • http://www.mineandthine.com/ Chris Dattilo

    Michael, How do people find your blog on Facebook? I have a blog – it's part of the blog network. But I've never stumbled across other blogs on Facebook.

    Do mean they are already your friend and see it listed on your wall or profile?

    • Mdorsey

      Link your blog post to facebook. Many bloggers do that, either manually or set to do it automatically through Networked blogs.  I have mine set to automatically link each time I post.

    • Mdorsey

      Sorry.  I didn’t notice the date. I’m sure you already know all of this by now. This post was reposted on fb today so I thought it was current.

  • http://faithfictionfunandfanciful.blogspot.com/ Lynn Squire

    I joined Twitter before I joined Facebook. I joined Twitter because you recommended it :)

    I joined Facebook because many of my friends from church and family from Canada and across the States were on it but not on Twitter (and would likely never join Twitter). With the exception of a few people (such as yourself – that because I pray for you and these other people), I've kept the purposes of these two services separate. Facebook is more for my personal life and Twitter more for my "professional" life. This works for me. I like Facebook because I can put up pictures, view pictures of friends and family I don't get to see as often, and catch up with those I'd otherwise only communicate with once a year. Interestingly enough, people who I could email, but don't, I've instant messaged via Facebook or communicated wall-to-wall. Can't do that with Twitter as easily.

    On the other hand, Twitter is too public a forum for those type of contacts, but it suits my publicity needs on a "professional" basis.

  • Teri D. Smith

    The two things I hate most about facebook are: 1. The comment place “what I am doing now”. There’s only one answer to that! Duh, I’m typing on facebook. 2. I dislike the constant e-mail updates. I’m capable of getting on facebook myself and checking it out.

    But on the plus side, I have connected with some friends I haven’t seen in a long time, and it’s the place where my daughter posts her most recent pictures so I can get them minutes after she takes them. But it wasn’t until this blog that I realized how facebook and twitter can be a blessing to writers.

    • http://www.bernardshuford.com/ Bernard Shuford

      Turn off the email updates :) There is such an option.

  • Teri D. Smith

    The two things I hate most about facebook are: 1. The comment place “what I am doing now”. There’s only one answer to that! Duh, I’m typing on facebook. 2. I dislike the constant e-mail updates. I’m capable of getting on facebook myself and checking it out.

    But on the plus side, I have connected with some friends I haven’t seen in a long time, and it’s the place where my daughter posts her most recent pictures so I can get them minutes after she takes them. But it wasn’t until this blog that I realized how facebook and twitter can be a blessing to writers.

    • http://www.bernardshuford.com/ Bernard Shuford

      Turn off the email updates :) There is such an option.

  • Pingback: CultureSmith Consulting » Blog Archive » 25 Things I Hate About Facebook

  • http://www.crittyjoy.wordpress.com/ Christy

    I enjoy facebook. After reading the comments though I realize I handle it a lot differently than most. I have very high privacy settings and I also filter my updates. I have only a select few that appear on my front page (only close friends and family,,,and influencers)….the account settings page is a great tool with facebook…you can choose what you want emailed to you as well as choosing which friends you want to get updates on (you can also do this on your first page when you hoover and the options tab comes up) It does take a little work though…. And I hate the application request with a passion and wish there was a way to control those!!

    It is a fun way to keep up with friends and to connect with new people…and it beats myspace any day!

    Although I do use it less since I discovered twitter :)

  • http://www.crittyjoy.wordpress.com Christy

    I enjoy facebook. After reading the comments though I realize I handle it a lot differently than most. I have very high privacy settings and I also filter my updates. I have only a select few that appear on my front page (only close friends and family,,,and influencers)….the account settings page is a great tool with facebook…you can choose what you want emailed to you as well as choosing which friends you want to get updates on (you can also do this on your first page when you hoover and the options tab comes up) It does take a little work though…. And I hate the application request with a passion and wish there was a way to control those!!

    It is a fun way to keep up with friends and to connect with new people…and it beats myspace any day!

    Although I do use it less since I discovered twitter :)

  • http://cba-ramblings.blogspot.com/ Rachelle

    I feel so much better now! I thought I was the only Facebook hater. I don't join groups, I don't go to "Events," I don't write on walls, I don't send Flair… aarrgghh. But it does help to think of it as one more way to point people to my blog. Thanks for the Monday morning laugh and the new way to think about FB.

  • http://www.linkedin.com/in/petenikolai Pete Nikolai

    I still enjoy Facebook, but I think that is because I have not expected much from it. Rather than trying to use it to connect with hundreds of people, I only accept friend requests from people I know and want to continue to know. Their status and other updates actually mean something to me.

    I maintain an even more extreme standard on Twitter by using it as an information system rather than trying to facilitate relationships. If I am interested in somebody, I will visit their Twitter page occasionally. I only “follow” news sources that I want to hear from when something happens.

    Let’s be honest: Can anybody “follow” more than a few people? Why would you want to? “Never before have so many people with so little to say said so much to so few.”

  • http://www.linkedin.com/in/petenikolai Pete Nikolai

    I still enjoy Facebook, but I think that is because I have not expected much from it. Rather than trying to use it to connect with hundreds of people, I only accept friend requests from people I know and want to continue to know. Their status and other updates actually mean something to me.

    I maintain an even more extreme standard on Twitter by using it as an information system rather than trying to facilitate relationships. If I am interested in somebody, I will visit their Twitter page occasionally. I only “follow” news sources that I want to hear from when something happens.

    Let’s be honest: Can anybody “follow” more than a few people? Why would you want to? “Never before have so many people with so little to say said so much to so few.”

  • http://www.karenrobbins.com/ Karen Robbins

    I enjoyed the video and agree with a lot of it. I take exception to the "Old people on FB." I am one–I think–yup, pretty sure at his age he'd qualify me. I like FB combined with Twitter. Like others have said, there are people I have as friends that would never use Twitter and FB helps me keep in touch. We recently changed churches and so I can still keep in touch with old friends. I also found a long-lost cousin. And another old friend who moved away years ago, suddenly discovered that I am a speaker and writer. I truly think that some of the work I did with FB helped spread the word about my recent book.

    I do get frustrated with having to click ignore a lot but I found that getting rid of many of the apps cut down on some of it. I vow never to throw another cyber snowball.

  • Monica Hensley

    I enjoyed the video and agree with most of it. However the good I have found in FB is greater than the annoying things. I have re-connected with people I would never have found otherwise and have even met some new people so worth the annoying requests – I just ignore them =) Many of my family live out of town so great way to stay connected through the year =)

  • http://www.teawithtiffany.com Tea With Tiffany

    I like Twitter way better than FB. FB is another animal. I don’t get it. I’ve thought of deleting my page too. All the fluff I’m sent is crazy. I “ignore” most of it. I update my FB page through my Twitter feed. I have to explain to people I am rarely on FB but because of my Twitter feed, it appears otherwise.

    Blogging is my favorite way to share.

  • http://internet.lifechurch.tv/ Tony Steward

    I see Facebook as more of a Rolodex of either current contacts and opportunities or a place to develop new ones.

  • http://internet.lifechurch.tv Tony Steward

    I see Facebook as more of a Rolodex of either current contacts and opportunities or a place to develop new ones.

  • http://rvcalgary.blogspot.com/ Fred Waters

    Facebook, in my opinion, is like the point and shoot camera that everyone owns. There was a time that photography was difficult…when you needed to know about fstops and apperature. Not so now – everyone can take a good photo. Facebook has made ‘blogging’ an easy thing to do, and a great way to connect.

    I have people connecting to my blog through Facebook all the time.

    But Michael I don’t get Twitter? Maybe I’m missing something, but I’m still working on it, and in the meantime my blog will feed into my facebook account!

  • http://rvcalgary.blogspot.com Fred Waters

    Facebook, in my opinion, is like the point and shoot camera that everyone owns. There was a time that photography was difficult…when you needed to know about fstops and apperature. Not so now – everyone can take a good photo. Facebook has made ‘blogging’ an easy thing to do, and a great way to connect.

    I have people connecting to my blog through Facebook all the time.

    But Michael I don’t get Twitter? Maybe I’m missing something, but I’m still working on it, and in the meantime my blog will feed into my facebook account!

  • http://www.john-gallagher.blogspot.com John Gallagher

    MIchael, Thought you would appreciate this post from Tim Stevens. Pretty timely based upon your post here. http://tinyurl.com/cp77wp. Enjoy!

  • http://www.generatornetwork.com Mike Rapp, Generator LLC

    I consult hundreds of authors, artists, marketers, speakers and publishing entities on the right strategy for online marketing.

    Two years ago we were of the belief that we needed to try to keep people at our clients’ sites (and therefore away from MySpace, Facebook, etc.). What we came to understand is that as the web evolves, there will be a definition between the free and not free worlds, and we needed to have our clients in both.

    So, we build our clients’ sites to be the home base for all their most loyal fans and customers, and then spider out to the social networking entities to draw them back to the home base. We are focused not on replacing Facebook, Blogger, Typepad and MySpace, but complimenting them — doing things the free world cannot do (or at least cannot do effectively).

    Facebook is terrific. I check in every day, usually more than once. But Facebook is a “light reading” environment, the abridged version of your relationships. Facebook is the front entrance/lobby of your church, not your small group or your Sunday school class.

    The free world will never be able to replace the custom world by its very nature. Free can only be free if there is a massive aggregate audience that can be monetized through advertising. The niche, however, is where the big money is, and where true community is grown.

    Summing up, most of us non-teens are still trained to think in the old way about communication. We may think we are “with it” because we have a Facebook account, but then get frustrated when Facebook doesn’t do everything and do it the way we want. Our mistake is in not getting that each of these emerging entities have their own special niche, and each will meet certain groups of people in the ways those folks prefer.

    As an aside, I have been a publisher with Rivals.com for six years. I and two partners create all the content for VandySports.com. One of the fascinating things we have discovered is that even in our relatively small niche (Vanderbilt athletics) there are segments of our niche (football, baseball, men’s basketball, women’s basketball, message board users, premium content subscribers, free board members, etc.). What is fascinating is how little overlap there is between these groups. We assumed that folks who loved men’s basketball would also love coverage of women’s basketball.

    We were wrong! People like what they like, and you cannot entice them to like things they don’t like (unless there is a quantum event like a Final Four).

    In that discovery, we also found out that there is a difference between what people want and what they will pay for. The balance between free and premium content is always delicate, but here’s the point: We know that without a regular flow of free content it is virtually impossible to get them into the paid subscription side of the network.

    I tell clients to think of this as fishing. If you want to catch fish, get more than one pole in the water and try different baits. Move around, try different depths, and see what happens. The goal is to fill the stringer over a period of time, preferably with a variety of fish. Then, when you have success, go back to those spots and fish again — realizing that what caught fish yesterday may yield empty hooks today.

    P.S. I might add that we have made great use of a widget called Blidget, distributed by a company called Widgetbox. A blidget feeds your public blog to your own site, as well as (any) other site out there. A fan could place your blog at their own site, for example, by simply copying and pasting the code into their web page.

    http://docs.widgetbox.com/developers/blidget/

  • http://elainaavalos.blogspot.com/ Elaina Avalos

    Larry – There is a way you can minimize the number of stories about what other people are doing in your feed. As each person’s “story” about the application they’ve joined or the picture they’ve commented appears in your feed, you should be able to click on the right hand side and choose the option to “see less” about that person or “see more” about that person. It should eliminate or cut way down on you seeing those “stories” about what your friends or their friends are doing.

  • http://elainaavalos.blogspot.com Elaina Avalos

    Larry – There is a way you can minimize the number of stories about what other people are doing in your feed. As each person’s “story” about the application they’ve joined or the picture they’ve commented appears in your feed, you should be able to click on the right hand side and choose the option to “see less” about that person or “see more” about that person. It should eliminate or cut way down on you seeing those “stories” about what your friends or their friends are doing.

  • http://www.gabetaviano.com Gabe Taviano

    Facebook to me is an opportunity to connect with the “less tech-savvy” family and friends. They might not read blogs, but it’s not a bad thing for them to at least know they can connect with me through there. It’s also been a vital point of communication for two ministry groups I manage. Allowing others to invite people to online or face-to-face events for free can’t be a bad thing.

    I do agree that it can be an extremely annoying community by itself. I might hang out there a few minutes each day. Thanks Michael!

  • http://www.gabetaviano.com/ Gabe Taviano

    Facebook to me is an opportunity to connect with the “less tech-savvy” family and friends. They might not read blogs, but it’s not a bad thing for them to at least know they can connect with me through there. It’s also been a vital point of communication for two ministry groups I manage. Allowing others to invite people to online or face-to-face events for free can’t be a bad thing.

    I do agree that it can be an extremely annoying community by itself. I might hang out there a few minutes each day. Thanks Michael!

  • http://seanwilder.blogspot.com/ Sean Wilder

    My goal is for people to be able to find me wherever they may be looking–Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, etc.–and for me to be able to connect with people wherever they may be. I have found FriendFeed and Google Reader to be excellent tools in managing all of it.

  • http://passionsforthesoul.typepad.com/vicki Vicki Small

    I haven’t the time, right now, to go to the 25 Things…. If we were comparing Facebook to MySpace, I’d say I hated MS and tolerate FB. I joined it and occasionally participate in it reluctantly; I spend way too much time in this chair, as it is, which is the same reason I haven’t started Twitter. I’m with Fred Waters: What am I missing??

    As to either Twitter or FB, let’s see who can guess what I’m doing, when I’m in FB, or if I were to tweet(?)! Having to tweet, tweak, twit, or whatever to say, “This is what I’m doing, now, or what I’m about to do,” is like keeping precise track of every single thing you do for 8 hours at work. How much time did I lose, while writing it down–or typing it!

  • http://seanwilder.blogspot.com Sean Wilder

    My goal is for people to be able to find me wherever they may be looking–Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, etc.–and for me to be able to connect with people wherever they may be. I have found FriendFeed and Google Reader to be excellent tools in managing all of it.

  • http://passionsforthesoul.typepad.com/vicki Vicki Small

    I haven’t the time, right now, to go to the 25 Things…. If we were comparing Facebook to MySpace, I’d say I hated MS and tolerate FB. I joined it and occasionally participate in it reluctantly; I spend way too much time in this chair, as it is, which is the same reason I haven’t started Twitter. I’m with Fred Waters: What am I missing??

    As to either Twitter or FB, let’s see who can guess what I’m doing, when I’m in FB, or if I were to tweet(?)! Having to tweet, tweak, twit, or whatever to say, “This is what I’m doing, now, or what I’m about to do,” is like keeping precise track of every single thing you do for 8 hours at work. How much time did I lose, while writing it down–or typing it!

  • http://www.flurrycreations.com/theblog John

    Mike, I have been tempted to blast my FB account as well. Then I discovered how easy it is to use my iPhone app and avoid all the clutter I hate when looking at FB on my PC. Recently I changed my contact website on FB to my blog and have been amazed how many new subscribers have found it through FB. So, I too will endure it as an outpost. I am a little concerned now to find out that FB owns all my content. Yikes! http://tinyurl.com/c4u9xl

    P.S. I love your new WP layout. Very crisp.
    @johnflurry

  • http://www.flurrycreations.com/theblog John

    Mike, I have been tempted to blast my FB account as well. Then I discovered how easy it is to use my iPhone app and avoid all the clutter I hate when looking at FB on my PC. Recently I changed my contact website on FB to my blog and have been amazed how many new subscribers have found it through FB. So, I too will endure it as an outpost. I am a little concerned now to find out that FB owns all my content. Yikes! http://tinyurl.com/c4u9xl

    P.S. I love your new WP layout. Very crisp.
    @johnflurry

  • http://www.teawithtiffany.com/ Tea With Tiffany

    I like Twitter way better than FB. FB is another animal. I don't get it. I've thought of deleting my page too. All the fluff I'm sent is crazy. I "ignore" most of it. I update my FB page through my Twitter feed. I have to explain to people I am rarely on FB but because of my Twitter feed, it appears otherwise.

    Blogging is my favorite way to share.

  • http://ryan.themarkelfamily.com/ Ryan Markel

    I agree with almost everything in that video about reasons to dislike Facebook. I find it to be very distracting from time to time. It’s useful to me in both reconnecting with people I don’t normally see anymore and maintaining contact information with them, and because I also use Twitter to change my status, people notice what I’m doing and will comment on it (which I receive via email).

    When working to assist marketers, the main problem has been that one of the biggest ways to interact with people regarding products and services is to start Groups, but Groups take a lot of time and attention to work properly, and there’s no way (that I can see) to be alerted when someone has posted to the Group or made other changes to it. I manage a Group for my product line and it’s difficult to find the time to manage it/check in with it every day. Add to that the fact that I can’t use my Facebook Inbox while at work (blocked), and it’s difficult to manage those relationships effectively.

    As someone else has said, the signal-to-noise ratio is also unfortunately bad and you can’t effectively manage it with the built-in tools. Twitter is a boon because it allows each person to manage their own information flow and thus limit the noise.

  • http://ryan.themarkelfamily.com Ryan Markel

    I agree with almost everything in that video about reasons to dislike Facebook. I find it to be very distracting from time to time. It’s useful to me in both reconnecting with people I don’t normally see anymore and maintaining contact information with them, and because I also use Twitter to change my status, people notice what I’m doing and will comment on it (which I receive via email).

    When working to assist marketers, the main problem has been that one of the biggest ways to interact with people regarding products and services is to start Groups, but Groups take a lot of time and attention to work properly, and there’s no way (that I can see) to be alerted when someone has posted to the Group or made other changes to it. I manage a Group for my product line and it’s difficult to find the time to manage it/check in with it every day. Add to that the fact that I can’t use my Facebook Inbox while at work (blocked), and it’s difficult to manage those relationships effectively.

    As someone else has said, the signal-to-noise ratio is also unfortunately bad and you can’t effectively manage it with the built-in tools. Twitter is a boon because it allows each person to manage their own information flow and thus limit the noise.

  • http://www.john-gallagher.blogspot.com/ John Gallagher

    MIchael, Thought you would appreciate this post from Tim Stevens. Pretty timely based upon your post here. http://tinyurl.com/cp77wp. Enjoy!

  • Dan Lynch

    Love Facebook, but agree with probably half of the 25 points in the video. FB certainly has it’s disadvantages, but I’ve found the advantages far out weigh those… Connecting with Family, friends, co-works in a quick non-evasive way. FB provides an outlet to stay connected quickly with those you’re not in regular contact with or perhaps a friend from long ago. Recently I’ve found many friends (close and not-so-close) from High School that I’ve caught up with. It’s been intriguing to see those that were “different” in HS and how much we’ve enjoyed catching up now. Also close friendships from people that have moved away rekindled, etc.

    Certainly FB has many many annoyances and they’d likely be wise to address some of these, but I’ve also found it’s easy to ignore items, requests, etc.

    Twitter….I honestly still don’t get. :-) I’m trying, learning, watching, but overall… updates way to often that seem meaningless in many ways. If you’re a high profile author, etc. certainly it can be a solid platform for communication, but I agree with many other comments on this site that Twitter, Facebook and other similar sites should be a portal to a main message site. Just my two cents.

  • Dan Lynch

    Love Facebook, but agree with probably half of the 25 points in the video. FB certainly has it’s disadvantages, but I’ve found the advantages far out weigh those… Connecting with Family, friends, co-works in a quick non-evasive way. FB provides an outlet to stay connected quickly with those you’re not in regular contact with or perhaps a friend from long ago. Recently I’ve found many friends (close and not-so-close) from High School that I’ve caught up with. It’s been intriguing to see those that were “different” in HS and how much we’ve enjoyed catching up now. Also close friendships from people that have moved away rekindled, etc.

    Certainly FB has many many annoyances and they’d likely be wise to address some of these, but I’ve also found it’s easy to ignore items, requests, etc.

    Twitter….I honestly still don’t get. :-) I’m trying, learning, watching, but overall… updates way to often that seem meaningless in many ways. If you’re a high profile author, etc. certainly it can be a solid platform for communication, but I agree with many other comments on this site that Twitter, Facebook and other similar sites should be a portal to a main message site. Just my two cents.

  • http://www.generatornetwork.com/ Mike Rapp, Generator

    I consult hundreds of authors, artists, marketers, speakers and publishing entities on the right strategy for online marketing.

    Two years ago we were of the belief that we needed to try to keep people at our clients' sites (and therefore away from MySpace, Facebook, etc.). What we came to understand is that as the web evolves, there will be a definition between the free and not free worlds, and we needed to have our clients in both.

    So, we build our clients' sites to be the home base for all their most loyal fans and customers, and then spider out to the social networking entities to draw them back to the home base. We are focused not on replacing Facebook, Blogger, Typepad and MySpace, but complimenting them — doing things the free world cannot do (or at least cannot do effectively).

    Facebook is terrific. I check in every day, usually more than once. But Facebook is a "light reading" environment, the abridged version of your relationships. Facebook is the front entrance/lobby of your church, not your small group or your Sunday school class.

    The free world will never be able to replace the custom world by its very nature. Free can only be free if there is a massive aggregate audience that can be monetized through advertising. The niche, however, is where the big money is, and where true community is grown.

    Summing up, most of us non-teens are still trained to think in the old way about communication. We may think we are "with it" because we have a Facebook account, but then get frustrated when Facebook doesn't do everything and do it the way we want. Our mistake is in not getting that each of these emerging entities have their own special niche, and each will meet certain groups of people in the ways those folks prefer.

    As an aside, I have been a publisher with Rivals.com for six years. I and two partners create all the content for VandySports.com. One of the fascinating things we have discovered is that even in our relatively small niche (Vanderbilt athletics) there are segments of our niche (football, baseball, men's basketball, women's basketball, message board users, premium content subscribers, free board members, etc.). What is fascinating is how little overlap there is between these groups. We assumed that folks who loved men's basketball would also love coverage of women's basketball.

    We were wrong! People like what they like, and you cannot entice them to like things they don't like (unless there is a quantum event like a Final Four).

    In that discovery, we also found out that there is a difference between what people want and what they will pay for. The balance between free and premium content is always delicate, but here's the point: We know that without a regular flow of free content it is virtually impossible to get them into the paid subscription side of the network.

    I tell clients to think of this as fishing. If you want to catch fish, get more than one pole in the water and try different baits. Move around, try different depths, and see what happens. The goal is to fill the stringer over a period of time, preferably with a variety of fish. Then, when you have success, go back to those spots and fish again — realizing that what caught fish yesterday may yield empty hooks today.

    P.S. I might add that we have made great use of a widget called Blidget, distributed by a company called Widgetbox. A blidget feeds your public blog to your own site, as well as (any) other site out there. A fan could place your blog at their own site, for example, by simply copying and pasting the code into their web page.

    http://docs.widgetbox.com/developers/blidget/

  • http://www.michaelhyatt.com/ Michael Hyatt

    @Jon, I agree that the Facebook app is really nice. In fact, I like it much better than the desktop interface. It make it almost manageable.

  • http://www.michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

    @Jon, I agree that the Facebook app is really nice. In fact, I like it much better than the desktop interface. It make it almost manageable.

  • http://theestherproject.wordpress.com Lex

    I’m a student ministry leader. I like Facebook ’cause almost all of my students are on Facebook and I can keep in touch with them throughout the week really easily.

    I can take 20 minutes on lunch to “send flair” or “superpoke,” and while it’s simple to do it means something to them. It tells them that I’m thinking about them and they’re important to me. It takes a little bit of insight to pick a “piece of flair” that hits on an inside joke, or something the student is really into.

    Facebook is also a great way to keep in touch with people since it’s more geared toward two-way conversation. It’s been especially useful for keeping in touch with non-Christian friends who wouldn’t really be drawn to my blog, or feel inclined to comment if they found themselves there.

  • http://theestherproject.wordpress.com/ Lex

    I'm a student ministry leader. I like Facebook 'cause almost all of my students are on Facebook and I can keep in touch with them throughout the week really easily.

    I can take 20 minutes on lunch to "send flair" or "superpoke," and while it's simple to do it means something to them. It tells them that I'm thinking about them and they're important to me. It takes a little bit of insight to pick a "piece of flair" that hits on an inside joke, or something the student is really into.

    Facebook is also a great way to keep in touch with people since it's more geared toward two-way conversation. It's been especially useful for keeping in touch with non-Christian friends who wouldn't really be drawn to my blog, or feel inclined to comment if they found themselves there.

  • http://chriscrimmins.com/ Chris Crimmins

    I really enjoy facebook. I use facebook for friends that I have actually spent time with in my past. I use twitter to track new and current friends. I do wish that you could opt out of certain things, but I suppose it is the same on twitter, sometimes I wish I could opt out of some conversations. Thanks for the blog Mike.

  • http://chriscrimmins.com Chris Crimmins

    I really enjoy facebook. I use facebook for friends that I have actually spent time with in my past. I use twitter to track new and current friends. I do wish that you could opt out of certain things, but I suppose it is the same on twitter, sometimes I wish I could opt out of some conversations. Thanks for the blog Mike.

  • http://www.carlytuma.com/ Carly Tuma

    Just another reason to hate Facebook: their new TOS grants them unequivocal subrights to anything and everything you post on their site, and they reserve the right to sell those subrights at their discretion.

    There’s more here: http://www.carlytuma.com/?p=89

  • http://www.carlytuma.com Carly Tuma

    Just another reason to hate Facebook: their new TOS grants them unequivocal subrights to anything and everything you post on their site, and they reserve the right to sell those subrights at their discretion.

    There’s more here: http://www.carlytuma.com/?p=89

  • http://www.gaymwalker.blogspot.com/ Gay Walker

    That was funny, but I do love Facebook. I just refuse to poke or play games, and use it instead to keep in touch with friends. And I don’t have Twitter update my status. There are settings to have “less” or “more” about people, so for those who do use it too much, you can tune them out unless something applies to you (fiddle with it, you’ll find them).

    And you’re real friends won’t tag you in a photo unless it’s cool with you (of course, I’m not a teenager anymore).

    What I like best? I reconnected with my seat mate from First Grade and a penpal I’ve written to off and on (mostly on but we lost touch about 5 years ago) for 33 years. That’s something.

  • http://www.gaymwalker.blogspot.com Gay Walker

    That was funny, but I do love Facebook. I just refuse to poke or play games, and use it instead to keep in touch with friends. And I don’t have Twitter update my status. There are settings to have “less” or “more” about people, so for those who do use it too much, you can tune them out unless something applies to you (fiddle with it, you’ll find them).

    And you’re real friends won’t tag you in a photo unless it’s cool with you (of course, I’m not a teenager anymore).

    What I like best? I reconnected with my seat mate from First Grade and a penpal I’ve written to off and on (mostly on but we lost touch about 5 years ago) for 33 years. That’s something.

  • http://www.spencesmith.com/ Spence Smith

    This is exactly right. I use facebook as a ‘social portal’ to my blog and to Twitter.

  • http://www.spencesmith.com Spence Smith

    This is exactly right. I use facebook as a ‘social portal’ to my blog and to Twitter.

  • http://www.defycreative.com/ Joey

    Yes and amen! Your mention of Chris Brogan’s comments are exactly how I feel about it. I even wrote about this on my own site. Hoping that it would lead to professional (I’m on Twitter and LinkedIn as well) and personal networking, I reluctantly joined FB. Initially it robs you of what could otherwise be productive time and then later becomes an annoyance.

    To me the big benefit is the tools available for groups, at least groups that actually gather in person somewhere. Additionally it has been nice to catch up with people that I haven’t seen in a long time.

    I dare say most of what people do on FB could be achieved through Twitter and other services attached to it.

  • http://www.defycreative.com Joey

    Yes and amen! Your mention of Chris Brogan’s comments are exactly how I feel about it. I even wrote about this on my own site. Hoping that it would lead to professional (I’m on Twitter and LinkedIn as well) and personal networking, I reluctantly joined FB. Initially it robs you of what could otherwise be productive time and then later becomes an annoyance.

    To me the big benefit is the tools available for groups, at least groups that actually gather in person somewhere. Additionally it has been nice to catch up with people that I haven’t seen in a long time.

    I dare say most of what people do on FB could be achieved through Twitter and other services attached to it.

  • http://www.janetgoldstein.com/ Janet Goldstein

    -Fun video, thx, and great discussion. I like FB for all the various reasons mentioned and especially for starting new connections with young 30something friends who I’m not likely to email. I’m inclined to limit my FB connections to people I really know. Other people can follow me on Twitter, or sign up on my website/blog. Otherwise, FB becomes business promotion.

    -I’ve had my Tweets linked to FB but I think they’ve been too business-y (according to some funny FB comments from my husband). I will probably undo that link. Anything automatic seems to defeat the point of real relationship building.

    I like Twitter for the open access to people, ideas, info, and bits of whimsy and humor. However, Twitter is NOT the be all and end all. I found the tweets from the TED and TOC conferences to be pretty unsatisfying, you-had-to-have-been-there reference. I’ve enjoyed reading the blog posts that provide more context and substance.

  • http://www.janetgoldstein.com Janet Goldstein

    -Fun video, thx, and great discussion. I like FB for all the various reasons mentioned and especially for starting new connections with young 30something friends who I’m not likely to email. I’m inclined to limit my FB connections to people I really know. Other people can follow me on Twitter, or sign up on my website/blog. Otherwise, FB becomes business promotion.

    -I’ve had my Tweets linked to FB but I think they’ve been too business-y (according to some funny FB comments from my husband). I will probably undo that link. Anything automatic seems to defeat the point of real relationship building.

    I like Twitter for the open access to people, ideas, info, and bits of whimsy and humor. However, Twitter is NOT the be all and end all. I found the tweets from the TED and TOC conferences to be pretty unsatisfying, you-had-to-have-been-there reference. I’ve enjoyed reading the blog posts that provide more context and substance.

  • http://www.shapingthespace.net David (@dg4G)

    Like a few people who’ve already posted, I use Facebook as a fairly closed environment, primarily to connect with people who are ‘on the net’ but wouldn’t even dream of something like blogging or twittering, etc. It’s a great way to share photos with o/s friends…but I’ve never dreamed of using it as a way to network more widely. If online friends find and friend me, that’s cool, but it’s primarily a way to stay in touch with IRL friends who are distant from me physically. And you can just ignore all those games/pokes/etc if you want :)

  • http://www.shapingthespace.net/ David (@dg4G)

    Like a few people who've already posted, I use Facebook as a fairly closed environment, primarily to connect with people who are 'on the net' but wouldn't even dream of something like blogging or twittering, etc. It's a great way to share photos with o/s friends…but I've never dreamed of using it as a way to network more widely. If online friends find and friend me, that's cool, but it's primarily a way to stay in touch with IRL friends who are distant from me physically. And you can just ignore all those games/pokes/etc if you want :)

  • http://evaulian-thebestoftheworst.blogspot.com/ Eva Ulian

    I find it hilarious that Facebook actually considers my posts so precious that they want to posses them- Quite honestly, they are welcome to them! Sometimes in Facebook you have to put your boxing gloves on as all kinds of people make friends with you, and I’m not one to ever say no. Moaning to a Twitter friend on Facebook who like me got harassed by those who don’t like your Religious outlook or political inclinations I am loathe to delete them because they are exactly the people you need to socialize with in order to keep this world rolling. However when it came to someone sending round a survey on what others thought what my sexual activities were I drew the line when “he” asked me to click on the url to see the results.

    I have a lot of family members on Facebook, some I had lost contact for years and even though I may not interact with them often, it’s nice to know we are all linked up. I adore a lot of my writer friends from writers’ groups I belong to but we now find that since most of our family members are on facebook we are not as free as we would like to express all those not so orthodox things we enjoy exchanging so we resort to the ever protective Outlook express email (not the Facebook one)- especially now that such intellectual property belongs to the big bad wolf.

    Apart from that, I enjoy being on Facebook, as I do being on Twitter, which are totally different from one another. My world would be quite diminished if I lost either of them.

  • http://www.danieldecker.net Daniel Decker

    For me I mostly use Facebook for people close to me (closer friends, people from church locally, old friends, etc) who aren’t as in to other forms of social media yet such as Twitter. Facebook, to me, is a little more two way. I enjoy going to friends pages and looking at new photos they post, etc. When I blog, it’s more about what I’m doing and less about what they’re doing.

    Having said that, I 100% dig Twitter. It’s my fav. I’ve connected with lots of great people and established a ton of business contacts.

    In conclusion. I blog to share ideas. I Facebook to stay connected to people closer to me. I Twitter to connect with the world in quick, digestible intervals. :)

  • http://www.courageoussingleparenting.blogspot.com Scoti Springfield Domeij

    I don’t poke, send flowers or ask someone to fill out lists of 25 to 100 items. But I’ve enjoyed reading their lists and have learned things I didn’t know about some of my friends. I’ve reconnected with college friends and kids that were in my children’s choirs who are now married and have their own children. I’m touched to see how much they love the Lord. I’ve made new online “friends” and will be connecting soon with someone who wants to know more about the Lord. This person sends me prayer requests. I post a link when I post a new blog posts. But people post their comments on Facebook instead of on my blogs. It’s also fun to “catch up” with people I haven’t seen in years. It’s so easy to look at their info page and their picture albums. For me, Facebook has been like old home week. Occasionally, I search for “Micheal Hyatt” to see what he’s up to and can scan his tweets. I can log on to Facebook once a day and see what people are up to. I also post Springs Writer’s workshops on Facebook and have started to connect with local writers who are unbelievers, but want to get together and get to know me. The best part is: my daughter-in-love posts pictures and videos of my first granddaughter and her incredibly kissable cheeks that I miss way too much!

  • http://evaulian-thebestoftheworst.blogspot.com/ Eva Ulian

    I find it hilarious that Facebook actually considers my posts so precious that they want to posses them- Quite honestly, they are welcome to them! Sometimes in Facebook you have to put your boxing gloves on as all kinds of people make friends with you, and I'm not one to ever say no. Moaning to a Twitter friend on Facebook who like me got harassed by those who don't like your Religious outlook or political inclinations I am loathe to delete them because they are exactly the people you need to socialize with in order to keep this world rolling. However when it came to someone sending round a survey on what others thought what my sexual activities were I drew the line when "he" asked me to click on the url to see the results.

    I have a lot of family members on Facebook, some I had lost contact for years and even though I may not interact with them often, it's nice to know we are all linked up. I adore a lot of my writer friends from writers' groups I belong to but we now find that since most of our family members are on facebook we are not as free as we would like to express all those not so orthodox things we enjoy exchanging so we resort to the ever protective Outlook express email (not the Facebook one)- especially now that such intellectual property belongs to the big bad wolf.

    Apart from that, I enjoy being on Facebook, as I do being on Twitter, which are totally different from one another. My world would be quite diminished if I lost either of them.

  • http://www.danieldecker.net/ Daniel Decker

    For me I mostly use Facebook for people close to me (closer friends, people from church locally, old friends, etc) who aren't as in to other forms of social media yet such as Twitter. Facebook, to me, is a little more two way. I enjoy going to friends pages and looking at new photos they post, etc. When I blog, it's more about what I'm doing and less about what they’re doing.

    Having said that, I 100% dig Twitter. It's my fav. I've connected with lots of great people and established a ton of business contacts.

    In conclusion. I blog to share ideas. I Facebook to stay connected to people closer to me. I Twitter to connect with the world in quick, digestible intervals. :)

  • http://www.courageoussingleparenting.blogspot.com/ Scoti Springfield Do

    I don't poke, send flowers or ask someone to fill out lists of 25 to 100 items. But I've enjoyed reading their lists and have learned things I didn't know about some of my friends. I've reconnected with college friends and kids that were in my children's choirs who are now married and have their own children. I'm touched to see how much they love the Lord. I've made new online "friends" and will be connecting soon with someone who wants to know more about the Lord. This person sends me prayer requests. I post a link when I post a new blog posts. But people post their comments on Facebook instead of on my blogs. It's also fun to "catch up" with people I haven't seen in years. It's so easy to look at their info page and their picture albums. For me, Facebook has been like old home week. Occasionally, I search for "Micheal Hyatt" to see what he's up to and can scan his tweets. I can log on to Facebook once a day and see what people are up to. I also post Springs Writer's workshops on Facebook and have started to connect with local writers who are unbelievers, but want to get together and get to know me. The best part is: my daughter-in-love posts pictures and videos of my first granddaughter and her incredibly kissable cheeks that I miss way too much!

  • http://the160acrewoods.com Amydeanne

    I’m with ya! I’d like to have closed my FB account a while back.. almost sorry I got on it, but it does a few connections I’d never have made!

  • http://www.netmediaconsultants.com Jube

    Michael, you were right, this conference was well worth missing NRB. Many of the same themes running through the social media workshops though. Thanks for sharing the link and the workshops!
    Blessings,
    Jube

  • http://the160acrewoods.com/ Amydeanne

    I'm with ya! I'd like to have closed my FB account a while back.. almost sorry I got on it, but it does a few connections I'd never have made!

  • http://timothyfish.blogspot.com/ Timothy Fish

    I ignore a lot of stuff on Facebook. What I like about it is that it has allowed me to get closer to friends and family. My family and friends are very scattered. I might see some of them once a year or less, but facebook allow me to keep up with them as if they lived a few blocks away.

  • http://www.netmediaconsultants.com/ Jube

    Michael, you were right, this conference was well worth missing NRB. Many of the same themes running through the social media workshops though. Thanks for sharing the link and the workshops!

    Blessings,

    Jube

  • http://timothyfish.blogspot.com/ Timothy Fish

    I ignore a lot of stuff on Facebook. What I like about it is that it has allowed me to get closer to friends and family. My family and friends are very scattered. I might see some of them once a year or less, but facebook allow me to keep up with them as if they lived a few blocks away.

  • http://synapticlight.com Phillip Gibb

    Facebook: Home base? interesting. Sometimes it feels like an outpost. There are so many people wanting to be friends that I would not consider residents of a homebase. But yes it is a place where pretty much of everything is consolodated; photos, events, you name it(almost).

    While twitter is a bit like fishing – reaching out to people that you are wanting to engage with but not necessarily what to open the home base door to.

    But honestly I use twitter more nowadays, the novelty of FB is wearing off; now it is just a tool to keep friends up to date and to promote my blog.

  • http://www.daveanthold.com/ Dave Anthold

    Facebook has its moments where you would like to shoot it, but in the end, I have had the great pleasure to connect w/friends I haven’t talked to in years (perhaps not even since grammar school). I also get the opportunity to meet people who I would maybe never get the chance to. . .like. . .you. Not that you’re unapproachable (just the opposite, I gather), but. . .hey. . .let’s face it. . .you run in a different circle then me. . .simply because you live in Nashville & me on the west coast. Nevertheless, Facebook is good for times like this. But I will say that I do enjoy Twitter a bit more, but I seem to be slowing my tweets cause I am just so busy. Thanks again!

  • http://www.daveanthold.com Dave Anthold

    Facebook has its moments where you would like to shoot it, but in the end, I have had the great pleasure to connect w/friends I haven’t talked to in years (perhaps not even since grammar school). I also get the opportunity to meet people who I would maybe never get the chance to. . .like. . .you. Not that you’re unapproachable (just the opposite, I gather), but. . .hey. . .let’s face it. . .you run in a different circle then me. . .simply because you live in Nashville & me on the west coast. Nevertheless, Facebook is good for times like this. But I will say that I do enjoy Twitter a bit more, but I seem to be slowing my tweets cause I am just so busy. Thanks again!

  • http://synapticlight.com/ Phillip Gibb

    Facebook: Home base? interesting. Sometimes it feels like an outpost. There are so many people wanting to be friends that I would not consider residents of a homebase. But yes it is a place where pretty much of everything is consolodated; photos, events, you name it(almost).

    While twitter is a bit like fishing – reaching out to people that you are wanting to engage with but not necessarily what to open the home base door to.

    But honestly I use twitter more nowadays, the novelty of FB is wearing off; now it is just a tool to keep friends up to date and to promote my blog.

  • http://www.michaelhyatt.com/ Michael Hyatt

    @Philip, actually, I suggest that my blog was my homebase. Facebook would be an outpost,

  • http://www.michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

    @Philip, actually, I suggest that my blog was my homebase. Facebook would be an outpost,

  • http://lynnrush.wordpress.com/ Lynn Rush

    I laughed like crazy at that video.

    I’ve heard in the last few days that many people are ticked off at FaceBook. I’m not seeing it. I love it. All those applications (groups, pokes, etc), I don’t do any of them. I have my settings set that I don’t accept them.

    I am more about talking with people on chat, checking out their status posts, and doing the blog networks. –Oh, but I have to admit, I’m diggin’ the scrabble application, really!

    It’s true about FaceBook directing to your blog. I get almost 80% of my blog hits from it. I’ve come to know many people, both writers and non writers through FaceBook linking them to my blog.

  • http://lynnrush.wordpress.com/ Lynn Rush

    I laughed like crazy at that video.

    I’ve heard in the last few days that many people are ticked off at FaceBook. I’m not seeing it. I love it. All those applications (groups, pokes, etc), I don’t do any of them. I have my settings set that I don’t accept them.

    I am more about talking with people on chat, checking out their status posts, and doing the blog networks. –Oh, but I have to admit, I’m diggin’ the scrabble application, really!

    It’s true about FaceBook directing to your blog. I get almost 80% of my blog hits from it. I’ve come to know many people, both writers and non writers through FaceBook linking them to my blog.

  • Kimmi

    Hi, Michael. As of yesterday, I’ve deactivated my FB. Too much of too much of nothing. My humble opinion.

  • Kimmi

    Hi, Michael. As of yesterday, I’ve deactivated my FB. Too much of too much of nothing. My humble opinion.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/Luke_Gedeon Luke_Gedeon

    I get a surprising amount of traffic to my blog from facebook, so I am keeping it.

    I use the TwitterTools for WordPress plugin from Alex King to send all of my blog posts to twitter and then pull all twitter updates to facebook. I also get a lot of facebook replies to tweets and those sometimes turn into blog posts.

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      I do the same, thing, Luke. I have the TwitterTools plugin and also pull allof my Twitter posts into Facebook.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/Luke_Gedeon Luke_Gedeon

    I get a surprising amount of traffic to my blog from facebook, so I am keeping it.

    I use the TwitterTools for WordPress plugin from Alex King to send all of my blog posts to twitter and then pull all twitter updates to facebook. I also get a lot of facebook replies to tweets and those sometimes turn into blog posts.

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      I do the same, thing, Luke. I have the TwitterTools plugin and also pull all
      of my Twitter posts into Facebook.

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  • http://www.floridabaptistwitness.com/ Joni B. Hannigan

    First, the video made me laugh out loud, really loud because I, too, am bothered by most of the things mentioned except that I've learned to reject and ignore the features of FB that I don't like. I've also turned people down who want to be my "Friend" only to build their own base (because they know my children, etc). I all but ignored my FB account set up in the early stages until my husband discovered someone I had been searching for that had a FB account. In less than a year, I have discovered a personal and practical dimension and now keep up with family members, old classmates (I'm approaching my 30 year high school class reunion), former students I have mentored, current students with whom I'm involved in a mentoring relationship, friends and colleagues. Within a few minutes I can check status updates and see what most people consider "breaking news" in their lives–or at least something somewhat important. I can also build impressions of people, keep my finger on some generational and other trends important to my business, etc. Probably, for me, more importantly, I can offer encouragement, or a prayer, when people ask or seem to be reaching out. Yes, it's that transparency that's there. And with FB, I can take a few minutes to look at pictures people take the time to post and repeat the above. I love people and I enjoy studying them. What are they thinking? Why do they believe what they believe? What makes them tick? How are they motivated? What drives their relationships? FB enables me to see that in a way that twitter cannot. As a writer, photojournalist and newspaper editor — FB is rich material! But more than that, it is a place to connect.

    Twitter is useful as well – but to compare them would be like comparing a gas oven to a microwave for me. I wouldn't cook my Thanksgiving turkey in a microwave any more than I would pop popcorn in my gas oven. One of the initial thing I enjoyed about Twitter was that it could update my status in FB. The down side to that was that FB people don't seem to enjoy the frequent "updates." So, the connectedness isn't always a plus, it would seem.

    Practically speaking, many people on FB haven't yet optimized a blog as you have and may use their FB as a psuedo blog. I know this is true for me. As I look to developing a blog, I am looking to yours as an example!

  • http://www.floridabaptistwitness.com Joni B. Hannigan

    First, the video made me laugh out loud, really loud because I, too, am bothered by most of the things mentioned except that I've learned to reject and ignore the features of FB that I don't like. I've also turned people down who want to be my "Friend" only to build their own base (because they know my children, etc). I all but ignored my FB account set up in the early stages until my husband discovered someone I had been searching for that had a FB account. In less than a year, I have discovered a personal and practical dimension and now keep up with family members, old classmates (I'm approaching my 30 year high school class reunion), former students I have mentored, current students with whom I'm involved in a mentoring relationship, friends and colleagues. Within a few minutes I can check status updates and see what most people consider "breaking news" in their lives–or at least something somewhat important. I can also build impressions of people, keep my finger on some generational and other trends important to my business, etc. Probably, for me, more importantly, I can offer encouragement, or a prayer, when people ask or seem to be reaching out. Yes, it's that transparency that's there. And with FB, I can take a few minutes to look at pictures people take the time to post and repeat the above. I love people and I enjoy studying them. What are they thinking? Why do they believe what they believe? What makes them tick? How are they motivated? What drives their relationships? FB enables me to see that in a way that twitter cannot. As a writer, photojournalist and newspaper editor — FB is rich material! But more than that, it is a place to connect.

    Twitter is useful as well – but to compare them would be like comparing a gas oven to a microwave for me. I wouldn't cook my Thanksgiving turkey in a microwave any more than I would pop popcorn in my gas oven. One of the initial thing I enjoyed about Twitter was that it could update my status in FB. The down side to that was that FB people don't seem to enjoy the frequent "updates." So, the connectedness isn't always a plus, it would seem.

    Practically speaking, many people on FB haven't yet optimized a blog as you have and may use their FB as a psuedo blog. I know this is true for me. As I look to developing a blog, I am looking to yours as an example!

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  • Haydee

    I so agree with u, michael. I wanted to delete my fbook too cos it looks like myspace now. Junkie, but I just left it as that. I love Twitter cos I stalk max lucado and so I can rcv updates only from peeps I follow. Ur tweets never fail to entertain me. Send my growl to Nelson, yea.

  • Haydee

    I so agree with u, michael. I wanted to delete my fbook too cos it looks like myspace now. Junkie, but I just left it as that. I love Twitter cos I stalk max lucado and so I can rcv updates only from peeps I follow. Ur tweets never fail to entertain me. Send my growl to Nelson, yea.

  • http://www.maclakeonline.com/ Mac Lake

    Twitter hands down!

  • http://www.maclakeonline.com Mac Lake

    Twitter hands down!

  • Helen Kidd

    While pros and cons, I use each medium for different purposes. I use Facebook for family, friends, and fan pages to simply follow. I use Twitter for professional resources, mentoring, and other JIT items such as breaking news. I normally don't follow someone someone who is both on Twitter and Facebook because if they want interaction, there is usually a link from Twitter to their FB or blog. LinkedIn is something I haven't fully honed yet but that, right now, is solely networking with other professionals and Twitter is connected to that.

  • Helen Kidd

    While pros and cons, I use each medium for different purposes. I use Facebook for family, friends, and fan pages to simply follow. I use Twitter for professional resources, mentoring, and other JIT items such as breaking news. I normally don't follow someone someone who is both on Twitter and Facebook because if they want interaction, there is usually a link from Twitter to their FB or blog. LinkedIn is something I haven't fully honed yet but that, right now, is solely networking with other professionals and Twitter is connected to that.

  • http://www.svys.com/ Tom Beggs

    what is so funny is that he points out lame FB functionality that could have been addressed and fixed in the most basic of usability research. Clearly, FB has spent more on pizza for the office.

  • http://www.svys.com Tom Beggs

    what is so funny is that he points out lame FB functionality that could have been addressed and fixed in the most basic of usability research. Clearly, FB has spent more on pizza for the office.

  • http://michellesidles.com/ Michelle

    I have a Twitter account, a Facebook page and a Blog. And I love all three for totally different reasons.

    Twitter is where I keep up with others in my business industry. It's also where I feel ok about posting more trivial things that happen in my life.

    Facebook is where I keep up with most of my IRL friends & family. It's an easy way for people who know me to find me and my contact information. I don't update it nearly as often but like to use it for occassional pics of the kids, and keeping up with people who I would otherwise NEVER cross paths with in my daily life.

    And my blog. My true home on the web. The place I feel like I can truly write as much as I want (I don't like the 140 char. limit on Twitter).

    What I also know is that people on FB (that I know) aren't that savvy. So they may ONLY go to FB. So that's where I put occassional links to my blog. Otherwise they'd never find my blog. ;)

    They are all interconnected for me but I use them all very differently. My biggest pet peeve is the people who use Twitter to update their FB. Facebook isn't intended to be used the same way as Twitter. IMHO. ;) Thanks for asking.

  • http://michellesidles.com Michelle

    I have a Twitter account, a Facebook page and a Blog. And I love all three for totally different reasons.

    Twitter is where I keep up with others in my business industry. It's also where I feel ok about posting more trivial things that happen in my life.

    Facebook is where I keep up with most of my IRL friends & family. It's an easy way for people who know me to find me and my contact information. I don't update it nearly as often but like to use it for occassional pics of the kids, and keeping up with people who I would otherwise NEVER cross paths with in my daily life.

    And my blog. My true home on the web. The place I feel like I can truly write as much as I want (I don't like the 140 char. limit on Twitter).

    What I also know is that people on FB (that I know) aren't that savvy. So they may ONLY go to FB. So that's where I put occassional links to my blog. Otherwise they'd never find my blog. ;)

    They are all interconnected for me but I use them all very differently. My biggest pet peeve is the people who use Twitter to update their FB. Facebook isn't intended to be used the same way as Twitter. IMHO. ;) Thanks for asking.

  • http://www.inamirrordimly.com/ ed cyzewski

    I actually receive more traffic through facebook than twitter, even though I probably invest more time at twitter.
    My recent post When It’s Good to be Wrong About Theology…

  • http://www.inamirrordimly.com ed cyzewski

    I actually receive more traffic through facebook than twitter, even though I probably invest more time at twitter.
    My recent post When It’s Good to be Wrong About Theology…

  • Eric Hanson

    I hope I'm not the first to say this, but my favorite thing on Facebook is the "ignore all" button. I also find twitter far more fun and rewarding (I'm in the process of trying to convert my friends). But in the meantime I can't delete my Facebook til i can prove it's guilty of completely wasting my time and not yielding any blog hits.

  • Eric Hanson

    I hope I'm not the first to say this, but my favorite thing on Facebook is the "ignore all" button. I also find twitter far more fun and rewarding (I'm in the process of trying to convert my friends). But in the meantime I can't delete my Facebook til i can prove it's guilty of completely wasting my time and not yielding any blog hits.

  • http://schindelfam6.blogspot.com/ Tammy

    So true…and funny
    My recent post Facebook…again

  • http://schindelfam6.blogspot.com Tammy

    So true…and funny
    My recent post Facebook…again

  • Teachermom

    What annoys me about facebook?
    Farmville, fishville, zoovile, mafiaville…..
    Status updates that include what's for dinner at your house tonight

  • Teachermom

    What annoys me about facebook?
    Farmville, fishville, zoovile, mafiaville…..
    Status updates that include what's for dinner at your house tonight

  • http://survivalguru.wordpress.com/ winnie

    OMG…its about time someone admitted all this about facebook, I hate all of the above and more…thanks so much. I will send your message out and be happier for knowing that you too feel like this…I HATE FACEBOOK…..
    My recent post Do you act with your gutt?

  • http://survivalguru.wordpress.com winnie

    OMG…its about time someone admitted all this about facebook, I hate all of the above and more…thanks so much. I will send your message out and be happier for knowing that you too feel like this…I HATE FACEBOOK…..
    My recent post Do you act with your gutt?

  • http://murphyfamilylife.blogspot.com/ Chrystal

    I too think facebook is annoying – or, really, some of my facebook friends use it in an annoying way. I've thought about deleting it – reducing the daily "noise" – but, for now, the vast majority of my friends and contacts are not on twitter. For that reason, FB is a good "outpost" for me.

    I have found several ways to make FB less annoying: 1) Turn off all email notifications. This way I'm not bombarded all day long with FB. I can pay attention to it when I choose to log in and I'm not getting emails all day. 2) Hide, Hide, Hide. I hide just about every FB App from my news feed. I don't care about someones fish or mafia or whatever so I just hide them. Then the only news I'm seeing are my friends posts, updates, pictures, etc. I also hide friends (shhh – don't tell them) that are particularly annoying with their status updates and such. You can still look at their FB page if you want to tell them something or look at their activity but you aren't slammed with it every day. 3) Block notifications/requests. If you have friends that send you a request for every app under the sun, you can actually block all requests from that user. They never know the difference but you don't have to click ignore every time they want to view your birthday on their calendar or want you to join their zoo.

    I do like that you can have picture albums vs. the random twit pic. I even like that you can schedule an event and invite your friends – much simpler than contacting everyone individually or sending snail mail invites.

    There's good and bad. I just try to minimize the bad and make it work for me in a more efficient way.
    My recent post Nothing Like a Clean Closet…

  • http://murphyfamilylife.blogspot.com Chrystal

    I too think facebook is annoying – or, really, some of my facebook friends use it in an annoying way. I've thought about deleting it – reducing the daily "noise" – but, for now, the vast majority of my friends and contacts are not on twitter. For that reason, FB is a good "outpost" for me.

    I have found several ways to make FB less annoying: 1) Turn off all email notifications. This way I'm not bombarded all day long with FB. I can pay attention to it when I choose to log in and I'm not getting emails all day. 2) Hide, Hide, Hide. I hide just about every FB App from my news feed. I don't care about someones fish or mafia or whatever so I just hide them. Then the only news I'm seeing are my friends posts, updates, pictures, etc. I also hide friends (shhh – don't tell them) that are particularly annoying with their status updates and such. You can still look at their FB page if you want to tell them something or look at their activity but you aren't slammed with it every day. 3) Block notifications/requests. If you have friends that send you a request for every app under the sun, you can actually block all requests from that user. They never know the difference but you don't have to click ignore every time they want to view your birthday on their calendar or want you to join their zoo.

    I do like that you can have picture albums vs. the random twit pic. I even like that you can schedule an event and invite your friends – much simpler than contacting everyone individually or sending snail mail invites.

    There's good and bad. I just try to minimize the bad and make it work for me in a more efficient way.
    My recent post Nothing Like a Clean Closet…

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/Nick_Shoemaker NickShoe

    I like Pages on Facebook. I can't stand junk apps and "seductive" ads, and being invited over and over to be someone's friend or fan.
    Facebook is close to being the got-to for modern society. Soon people will be utilizing the Facebook Connect feature for purchases. Once Facebook become "modus spendus" look out, the sky is the limit. Don't believe me? Let me ask you this: What did you think of PayPal when it first started to appear? If you're anything like me, you thought nothing of it, but now try making a purchase online without it being an option, if not the only option. Facebook already has the credibility to do what took PayPal years to accomplish.
    My recent post 30×30 Video Weight-loss Journal

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/Nick_Shoemaker NickShoe

    I like Pages on Facebook. I can't stand junk apps and "seductive" ads, and being invited over and over to be someone's friend or fan.
    Facebook is close to being the got-to for modern society. Soon people will be utilizing the Facebook Connect feature for purchases. Once Facebook become "modus spendus" look out, the sky is the limit. Don't believe me? Let me ask you this: What did you think of PayPal when it first started to appear? If you're anything like me, you thought nothing of it, but now try making a purchase online without it being an option, if not the only option. Facebook already has the credibility to do what took PayPal years to accomplish.
    My recent post 30×30 Video Weight-loss Journal

  • Fidel

    I think Facebbok is a Waste of time for people that have nothing to do, designed to connect people that juts want to kill time, because they have nothing positive, lucrative or profitable to do, ecxept those that do selling and find Victims here. I hope I’m not the first to say this, but I am not a fan of this time wasting and my favorite thing on Facebook is go in once in a while once a week may be and see how much valuable time people is wasting

  • Fidel

    I think Facebbok is a Waste of time for people that have nothing to do, designed to connect people that juts want to kill time, because they have nothing positive, lucrative or profitable to do, ecxept those that do selling and find Victims here. I hope I’m not the first to say this, but I am not a fan of this time wasting and my favorite thing on Facebook is go in once in a while once a week may be and see how much valuable time people is wasting

  • Logan

    I got a virus from Facebook :/ I had to deactivate my account, and get my laptop fixed. Thanks a lot, Facebook!

  • Logan

    I got a virus from Facebook :/ I had to deactivate my account, and get my laptop fixed. Thanks a lot, Facebook!

  • Martin

    The video was amusing, but many of the aggravations were, as a previous poster suggested, easily fixable or ignorable. However, some issues, such as the impact of the technology on close personal relationships and our ability to engage others in a stronger and more intimate way than those relationships would normally permit are well worth consideration. I know I have caused anger, pain, disappointment, and distress to others, some whom I barely know, by my ill-considered posts. Facebook, like most innovations, is not perfect, nor is it an unmixed blessing, but I derive a great benefit if I use the same care I apply to my face-to-face encounters.

  • Martin

    The video was amusing, but many of the aggravations were, as a previous poster suggested, easily fixable or ignorable. However, some issues, such as the impact of the technology on close personal relationships and our ability to engage others in a stronger and more intimate way than those relationships would normally permit are well worth consideration. I know I have caused anger, pain, disappointment, and distress to others, some whom I barely know, by my ill-considered posts. Facebook, like most innovations, is not perfect, nor is it an unmixed blessing, but I derive a great benefit if I use the same care I apply to my face-to-face encounters.

  • http://intensedebate.com/profiles/danielgsnyder danielgsnyder

    Brilliant. This is one of the best videos I've seen recently. I agree completely. Though i won't be deactivating my facebook account anytime soon, it's still too useful of a networking tool.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/DerekDRobertson DerekDRobertson

    Well I would have to say that I agree with Chris Brogan. Although I dont have a blog that has any huge following. I do use twitter and facebook to catch people that might not necessariy go to my blog. I also post my blog through Posterous which acutually sends my blog to three different places. This way i can catch as many people as possible. No this does not help my blog as far as visitors but I still get out there what I want people to read in many fashions. So I say use it all to your advantage

  • http://twitter.com/DutchRiete @DutchRiete

    I am most definitely not a Twitter or Facebook afficionado, even though I have an account on both sites. I use both to keep in touch with people I know but won't have time to see that often or to just follow some people I'm interested in. Having said that, Facebook has made it possible for me to get in touch with some long lost friends, so that's a good thing. And Twitter got me here, so that's a good thing too :))
    My "home base" however is on Multiply, a social networking site that specializes in "less contacts, more contact" … in-depth relationships and in-depth blogs.

  • zkwc

    I HATE GAME INVITES AND STUPID GIFTS FROM GAMES I HAVE NO INTEREST IN PLAYING!

  • https://sites.google.com/site/ericjamz/ Eric Simpson

    I hate the brevity and superficiality of twitter, prefer fb. Why contact so many people if the sum total of your relationship with them is to sell yourself? Seems pretty empty to me, and the internet offers more.

  • http://www.gospelofkingdom.com Gregory Scott

    MIchael-
    Just read this post for the first time. I couldn't agree more. I was beginning to think I was the only one who felt this way. Thanks for validating me.

  • Anonymous

    I’m writing a book about Facebook’s impact on relationships by having coffee (or a meal or something) in person with all of my FB friends. We hang out, catch up and then I interview them. After about 40 conversations, it’s amazing to hear the range of things that annoy people. Facebook is a community that runs without any communal understanding or shared standards of behavior. We’ve individualized and privatized ourselves so much and it’s almost intolerable to deal with others who see or behave outside our personalized etiquette codes. Julian’s list is funny but the people I’ve interviewed haven’t mentioned any of these things. Farmville was the top pet peeve for a while but politics and whining are the things that people consistently hate the most. Stay tuned, I’ve got another 200+ interviews to do, we’ll see.

    On the business side, I think Chris is right about having outposts. How successful the FB is as a business outpost is wholly untested. I argue that the entire dynamic of the user base will have to shift for it to be successful for business. People aren’t there for commerce right now, they are there for relationship, be it a different kind of relationship.

  • http://twitter.com/levittmike Michael Levitt

    I recently finished a fast from Facebook. Twitter is better for me to learn from others, and not be so wrapped up with whom needs a cow for their farm ;-)

    Blessings on your Christmas and all the best for 2011.

  • http://twitter.com/ToscaSac T

    I dislike FB for the way the site is built. The fact that the world knew no better and just flocked there is well a sheeple kinda thing. I hate a lot of what MZ seems to stand for in the way of using social media and so of course this is nothing surprising. My friends and connections do not bother me. When they do I unfriend them. I am loving having two Twitter accounts, two blogs, options like pages and groups on FB to further keep distance from people I know and connect to strangers I do not. Google+ has it’s pluses and minuses in much the same way. No one seems to have gotten it right. POUT sigh

  • Kennisha Hill

    LOL! Loved the video!

  • Cepickerel60

    I think some people just love to hate stuff.  That’s what I think.  I wouldn’t even have known about this video had it not been posted on facebook.  If you don’t like it…..jump out!   It’s amazing to me how many peoople gripe about facebook and still use it.

  • Cepickerel60

    It’s a SOCIAL NETWORKING site…..get over it!  Anti-social people probably won’t like it.

  • Scowcat

    Dear Mr Hyatt…I have to admit though I have been on twitter for a few short months – I have to agree that have found some amazing items on twitter – many of them are on your site! Facebook is an entirely different tool.  It has it’s purpose.  I agree with practically every one of his statements. Thanks so much for sharing your wisdom…Just finished up my PLP and I am excited to share your e-book with others! 

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Awesome! Thanks.

  • http://twitter.com/autigers1970 autigers1970

    To be honest, most of them would annoy me but I’ve either eliminated them by clicking that little “x” and hiding various games and apps forever, or I just don’t seem to have people who do annoying stuff like poke me. 

    And frankly, I know it’s silly but I love the Happy Birthday messages.

  • http://www.forward-living.com W. Mark Thompson

    Facebook makes more sense to me. Seems like there’s more of a connection with people on facebook. Twitter seems like a social drive-by. But, if you’re trying to save time, that makes more sense. I’ve been away from twitter for a while, but in the past few weeks, I’ve been trying to get back to it.

    But I like Brogan’s explanation with the home base and outposts explanation.

  • guest

    I hate my sister in law always writes bullcrap on the fuckin’ face book, she said she allowed herself to go to Burger King or Mcdondals once a week, and she said she thanked God for letting her have enough health to burn the calories, then her friends, most bitches replied to her, anf those bitches always blame those greasy spoon restaurants letting them fat, bullcrap! What kind of food is not fattening anyway, and I don’t really give a damn shit about their dumb thinkings, what to blab about for anyway? If I have to say shit, I can also say my stomach isn’t impossibly flat because of too much beer. Really have enough of those dumb posts from those dumb bitches, I’m also a female, but I’d never say this kind of dumb shit

  • http://decker.com/blog/ BertDecker

    Facebook is a connector and an information gatherer. Have had some neat experiences on it. Don’t agree with the 25 comments, but agree with about 15 of them. Particularly games, groups and excessive posts. But you can ignore them. Don’t put an age on Facebook – I won’t qualify. (I do have to refrain from posting to grandchildren, but great to see their lives unfold.) Anyway, it’s evolving, so good to be a part of that…

  • http://michellejorna.com/blogweb Michelle Jorna

    Thanks for posting the funny video I agree those 25 things are annoying! I find facebook fabulous though for connecting with family and friends on the other side of the world, with the time difference I always miss the tweets but see the facebook updates which allows us to stay in touch. Its good to assess your aims for each social media platform though- thanks for the prompt to do just that!

  • Frank Buck

    I could not agree more than abuot the reference to the importance of the blog. I have always told people it’s at the center. Twitter and Facebookprovide a quasi RSS feed for people who may not even understand RSS. I use both, because MANY people have an account on Facebook but not Twitter. Not being limited to 140 characters is a plus for FB. The threaded comments and thumbnail photos of links you reference are each a plus for Facebook.

  • Trina

    That just made me laugh!

  • http://twitter.com/nmabry nmabry

    I still like Facebook.  However, I have had to work hard to tweak what actually comes into my News Feed.  I block every “noisy” app and select what updates I want from different individuals.

  • http://twitter.com/Renmeleon Renmeleon

    Thank you for sharing the Julian Smith link, I am still giggling about it and agree wholeheartedly with every single point. He nailed it. I would also like to point out though that a great deal of it can be avoided if you manage your settings properly. That said, with as many “updates” as Facebook makes, it can be a pain to constantly RE-manage everything after they have reset it.

    I joined Facebook in order to keep up with the friends who had migrated there totally, even so much as to no longer answer regular emails. I do see the value in it as an outpost, great perspective, but will still hope for an option to avoid it completely in future as it is a definite timesink. I use Twitter and prefer it, admittedly having more than one account, and have grown fond of Tweetdeck as I sometimes manage client posts as well.

    @renmeleon  (personal, catch all)
    @artforcures (my non-profit)

  • https://www.facebook.com/AuntiesWorkshop Auntie

    Things that annoy me about Facebook:

    The Ticker – it is a total waste of screen space.

    The “Ask Question” button – you know, you can ask a question without it.

    Facebook “grouping” your friends for you.  Why???

    The inability to format posts.

    People who tag you in a picture…and it’s not a picture of you (It’s a pic of dog, a building, a baby, etc)

    Abbreviations that don’t make sense.  Some examples:  prolly (probably), meh for “me” (really?), wat (what), dat (that).  Sheesh!

    The “your friend just answered a question about you” thing.  *Rolls eyes*

    Teenage wall fights. 

    • https://www.facebook.com/AuntiesWorkshop Auntie

      Oh yeah, and timeline.  I HATE THE TIMELINE.

  • http://christopherbattles.net/ Christopher Battles

    I prefer Twitter much more, but I see upsides Facebook also. As Facebook is mainly people I know in “real life” it is a way to keep up with them.  The amount of notifications does get crazy, but there does seem to be more ways to control that now.  I just post to Twitter and have it go to Facebook most of the time.
    Thank you Michael, that was a great video.

    K, bye

  • http://twitter.com/mcnairwilson mcnair wilson

    Clever video. It’s a good start. I’d add: the inability to go into a comment stream (of something I’ve posted on my page) and delete individual comments from bullies, the foul mouthed, and folks who’s mom and dad might be cousins.

  • Joseph Reynolds

    I use facebook to keep in touch with family and friends. Twitter? I consider it little more than verbal diarrhea. I occasionally use it to keep in touch with a conference hash tag… but mostly it leaves me feeling like I need a shower.

  • Jeanie Hackett

    Michael, you have been inspirational to me. After reading your book, I designed & launched my site (just went live this week!) Jeaniehackett.com. I’m an actor, acting teacher, director, etc. But I can see you really don’t “get” FB. (Perhaps you are just too advanced!) Here’s how I see it: Twitter is for “the world” to find you. Your tribe of strangers who all have something in common.  FB is for everyone who has known you in a more personal way over all the years — and other than that, you may have nothing in common. It doesn’t really generate income, it just generates…sustaining the shared connection. FB eliminates the social silos that we’ve accrued in our lives. 

    I think there is nothing more grand than seeing a comments from 15 different people from diverse places and times in my life all in the same space as the same time. I mean, imagine if that really happened in real life…a high school friend, with that really nice family you met in Paris, with that old boyfriend you’re now friendly with from college, with your Mother’s best friend from PA, with your hot-shot lawyer cousin with your pilates teacher, etc. I mean, we used to think that was what happened in heaven, right?  Something to me very human and touching about that.So…it’s not just because you will hear from people there who’ve discovered your amazing blog…it’s because the primacy of the journey we have with other people trumps time, place, status,# of followers, etc.  

    Thanks again for all your wonderful posts, the book, podcasts, etc.! 

    • http://michaelhyatt.com/ Michael Hyatt

      I actually wrote this almost four years ago. I am now an active user of FB. I still don’t like it all that much, but for different reasons. Thanks.

  • Roberto

    I agree too! However I’ve spend time turning off all notifications and such. Made my FB as private as possible to avoid all those things popping up.

  • Mkrfreenchrist

    I like facebook because it is my best way to connect with dear friends in Germany and Zimbabwe. This is where I receive personal messages about how they are doing, pictures and sometimes videos. I also like FB because it gives opportunity to encourage others and share requests for prayer. I just read this morning of a 41 weeks pregnant woman whose baby is stillborn. The aunt and friend of mine, was asking for prayer for her family. It is a great tool for these reasons.  
    I love the humor in the video posted above and while much of it is true…social sites shouldn’t be a mode to be “all about myself”. Blogs can be venues of self promotion or promotion of your family….a wordier place to say to others, “hey listen to me, look at me, aren’t I great and look at what all my family is doing”. Therefore, while I like to write and enjoy sharing my life, thoughts and experiences with others, I prefer to do that face to face. And unless it’s really helpful information, who really has time to keep up with everyone’s blogs…it’s like getting a newsletter in the mail at Christmas rather than a simple card wishing the other person a blessed holiday. Again, some blogs are a tool to be self-indulgent, however, I really like Michael Hyatt’s.

  • Rated_insane

    1. Fishing Statements, e.g., “Why do certain people have to treat me this way?”
    2. Cheesy quotes disguised as status updates as a means to validate your life to the world, e.g., “I am your parent: I will hold you tight, support you, guide you, hug you, blah blah BLAH”
    3. Worse – inviting people to like your cheesy comment if they agree
    4. Too many people tooting their own horn too many times a day, and disguising it as gratefulness. “I am now fabulous, I have worked so hard to achieve this (and have already told you about it everyday for the last year), I am thanking every one of my facebook friends for my fabulousness, join me on my fabulousness, we can be fabulous together.”
    5. That is okay for company’s to essentially buy your “Likes” by entering you into a (probably fictitious) prize draw if you do.

  • Melinda Todd

    A photo or status from someone I am NOT friends with on FB because someone I am friends with LIKED it. Um, wow. I don’t need to know my friend liked their friend’s cousin’s brother’s baby photo! I keep chat turned off at all times. I can’t stand it. The games requests etc. Seriously, just no.

    • http://theordainedbarista.com/ Barry Hill

      Melinda, I agree!
      I always thought it was strange that Facebook would show you what your friends were liking (that has 0 to do with you—as long as permissions were set) and they DO NOT show you ALL of what your friends are posting. The truth is we/you only get a % of what your friends are posting everyday based on interactions and likes. Twitter will post everything. strange!

  • BB

    I’m hoping Facebook will totally die soon.