No Podcast for This Week

I am not posting a new podcast today. I came down with laryngitis over the weekend and lost my voice. I was unable to record my show on Monday as usual.

Thankfully, my voice started returning a bit yesterday. I was able to do my webinar last night, but, if you attended, you know I still sounded pretty rough!

Thanks for your patience and support. I look forward to connecting with you next week.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are snarky, offensive, or off-topic. If in doubt, read My Comments Policy.

  • http://www.skipprichard.com/ Skip Prichard

    There’s a teaser if we ever saw one! I’m sure we will all benefit from your project.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com/ Michael Hyatt

      Thanks, Skip. I hope so. We are doing two full days of filming here in Nashville. I can’t wait to share the project with everyone.

  • http://dalemelchin.wordpress.com/ Dale Melchin

    Boo!!! Just kidding, sir.  Enjoy your work on the project!

  • http://www.jonstallings.com/ Jon Stallings

    I guess I will have to listen to your publishing teleseminar again – :)

  • http://www.revivallifestyle.com/ Daniel Vogler

    Good to set clear priorities!
    Looking forward to next week’s podcast!

  • http://blog.cyberquill.com/ Cyberquill

    Wanted to let you know. One of my literary pet peeves. Excellent. 

    Why start an announcement with the words “I wanted to let you know that…”? 

    Obviously, the sole purpose of an announcement is to let people know something. And “wanted” as opposed to what? Having a gun pointed to one’s head and being forced to? And why the past tense? Do you mean that at the time of composing the announcement, your wanting had ceased? 

    It’s like getting one of these emails that start “I’m writing you to inform you that…” (or, even more perplexingly, “I’m writing you because I wanted to inform you that…”) Why preface a message thus? We can tell simply by having received an email that its sender wrote (not painted or sculpted) to inform us of something, for why else would s/he have sent us an email? 

    If someone walks up to me and says, “I wanted to thank you,” my natural response will be “Ah, and then what happened? You changed your mind?” Either thank me, or don’t thank me. But to simply inform me that at some point in the past you had the desire to thank me doesn’t tell me (a) whether that desire still persists nor (b) whether you’re about to do as you desire. 

    Or someone says, as people often do, “I would like to thank you.” Well, I would like to fly to Mars. That doesn’t mean it’ll ever happen, and it certainly doesn’t mean that I am flying to Mars as we speak, just as “I would like to thank you” doesn’t mean I’m thanking right now. All I’m doing is declaring my desire to do so in the future. Ever noticed how people profess their desire to thank, and then they never actually do? 

    All this may sound a bit nitpicky bordering on the neurotic, but I once had a business correspondence teacher who would harp on this kind of stuff in the most hilarious manner, and this is one of the few things I took away from business school. If you were in his class and you padded a sentence with redundant fluff along the lines of “I would like to inform you,” you were in for an earful, not to mention a lower grade for your assignment.

    On a more serious note, there is a fascinating book titled “I Know You Are Lying,” written by a former CIA interrogator who discusses what we actually say versus what we appear to be saying, and what these seemingly innocuous discrepancies might indicate in terms of what’s going on in our subconscious or even whether they may be the result of a deliberate attempt to deceive the listener.

    • http://www.twitter.com/erikjfisher/ Erik Fisher

      I wanted to let you know…

      your comment was pretty long. :)

      • http://blog.cyberquill.com/ Cyberquill

        I would like to thank you for pointing that out. Unfortunately, I’m pretty booked at the moment. Can I thank you next week sometime?

        • http://www.twitter.com/erikjfisher/ Erik Fisher

          Have your quill call mine. :)

          • http://blog.cyberquill.com/ Cyberquill

            I just wanted to reply to let you know that I’d like to consider this option.

    • Donald

      Thanks for your entertaining comment.

      Thanks for the book recommendation.  I’ve had some discussions here at work about phrasing that appears to be responsive but provides no real answer.  Very politically charged environment here and it sounds like the book could be insightful.

      • http://blog.cyberquill.com/ Cyberquill

        I found it fascinating, but in order to enjoy it, one must probably have a pronounced predilection for splitting hairs. BTW, the Kindle version just came out a few months ago.

        CORRECTION: According to his bio on Amazon, the author was with the Secret Service and then the U.S. Marshal’s Service, not with the CIA, as I erroneously stated in my comment.

  • http://www.martinamcgowan.com/ Martina McGowan

    This is an important concept that many people don’t really get. We need to say “No,” sometimes to things that are important to us to work on something more meaningful in the moment.

    Yes, a teaser, but a good lesson as well, Michael.

  • rabbimoffic

    Will miss it! looking forward to next week. 

  • http://www.twitter.com/erikjfisher/ Erik Fisher

    I totally respect your decision. This week is the last week I will be publishing my podcast until mid January. I am taking some extended down time, and even internet detox time for the rest of the month starting next week through to just after the new year. 

    I will be excited to hear your new episodes to kick off the new year!

    • Jim Martin

      Erik, I listen to your podcast regularly.  You are doing a great job with these interviews!

      • http://www.twitter.com/erikjfisher/ Erik Fisher

        Thanks, Jim. Glad you are enjoying it. 

    • http://michaelhyatt.com/ Michael Hyatt

      Thanks, Erik. Enjoy your time off.

  • http://www.DavidASpecht.com/ David A Specht

    Thanks for letting us know. Now we don’t have to blame the Podcast APP on our iPhones.

  • http://twitter.com/ryanreedme Ryan Reed

    All of us hope that one of the projects will be the new “Get Noticed” wordpress theme! Any updates on when we can expect the release of the beta version? Thanks, Michael! I read your book, and it has been a total game changer for me. I have been implementing its elements over the last month, especially in regard to social media. Already, I have noticed traffic pick up and my platform grow! Excited to witness these changes take place on the web, as well! Thanks for giving us young, new guys a chance!

    • http://twitter.com/beardonabike Shane Blackshear

      What he said…about the theme.

  • TheSohrs

    Hi Michael,
    I totally understand. Please know that your podcasts are the best and I look foward to them each week. I await your next one and to see how your latest project will add value to my life. Thanks for all you do.

    Kerry Clark

  • Chester

    No podcast is music to my ears.

    The nicest holiday gift you could give me!