#029: 7 Rules for More Effective Slide Presentations [Podcast]

Whether you are a professional speaker or someone who only makes the occasional presentation, you could be more effective with better slides. In this podcast, I share my seven rules for better presentations.

Presentation With LCD Projector - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/Arand, Image #7610474

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/Arand

I have sat through hundreds of slide presentations, maybe thousands. Some of them were stunning; most of them mind-numbing. I will also share with you from my experience as a professional speaker, who doesn’t have it all figured out but who is committed to never-ending improvement.

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Never Waste a Good Fiasco

This is a guest post by Tyler Ellis. He serves on staff with Newark Church of Christ as a Campus Minister at the University of Delaware. He is also author of the upcoming book, Questions Everything. You can read his blog and follow him on Facebook and Twitter.

Fiascos are inescapable. A change of circumstance. A wild goose chase. An obstacle that thwarts what you had envisioned.

Young Businessman in the Middle of a Fiasco - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/pixdeluxe , Image #12192393

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/pixdeluxe
  • Flights get delayed.
  • Guest speakers cancel.
  • Donors drop support.
  • The flu comes around.
  • Equipment breaks down.

How to Get Your Boss to Say “Yes,” Part 3

The ability to sell an idea or project to your boss is critical to your success. If you can’t get your boss’s approval when you need it, you are not going to go very far in your career. In this three-part series I share six steps for doing it more effectively. In this post, I cover the last two steps. (You can find Part 1 here and Part 2 here.)

In my last post, I wrote about how to prepare to make a presentation to your boss. To get him to say, “yes,” I encouraged you to prepare a brief, written proposal. I even provided a template.

Woman Giving Her Approval on a Proposal - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/nuno, Image #2437760

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/nuno

Once you’ve done that, it’s time to anticipate objections and formulate talking points for each one. Don’t risk getting a “no” because you haven’t carefully thought through the questions and your responses.

How to Get Your Boss to Say “Yes,” Part 2

The ability to sell an idea or project to your boss is critical to your success. If you can’t get your boss’s approval when you need it, you are not going to go very far in your career. In this three-part series I share six steps for doing it more effectively. In this post, I cover the second two steps. (You can find Part 1 here and Part 3 here.)

In my last post, I wrote about the importance of seeing your boss as the customer. To get him to say, “yes,” you have to first understand his needs. Moreover, you have to frame your proposal in terms of how it will help him accomplish his goals.

Man with a Laptop Against a Blackboard - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/mattjeacock, Image #19460301

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/mattjeacock

Then, you have to commit to success. You must be determined to get to “yes,” because your reputation depends on it—first with your boss and second with the people you lead. Once you have taken these first two steps, you are ready for step three.

How to Get Your Boss to Say “Yes,” Part 1

The ability to sell an idea or project to your boss is critical to your success. If you can’t get your boss’s approval when you need it, you are not going to go very far in your career. In this three-part series I share six steps for doing it more effectively. In this post, I cover the first two steps. (You can find Part 2 here and Part 3 here.)

When I was in corporate management, I spent a great deal of time listening to proposals. Those doing the pitching usually needed my approval to proceed with their project. Frankly, I was amazed at how poorly most people do in these kinds of situations.

An "Approved" Rubber Stamp - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/DNY59, Image #6618875

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/DNY59

In fairness, most of us never received any formal training in this important skill. As a result, we flounder about, not knowing why it seems so difficult to get to “yes.”

#026: How to Lead in Turbulent Times [Podcast]

It’s no secret that the last four or five years have been challenging from an economic, technological, and global perspective. In this episode, I discuss five actions leaders must take in order to lead well in turbulent times.

A Ship on a Turbulent Sea

When I speak publicly on this topic, I call this presentation, “Shift: Leading in Turbulent Times.” I use the word “shift” for two reasons:

  1. The world seems to be shifting under our feet.
  2. We must also shift if we are going to lead well.

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A Question That Changes Everything

In 2003, I was named President of Thomas Nelson. It was an extremely busy time. I made some major changes to my executive team and had two vacant positions. As a result, I essentially had three jobs.

An Undecided Businessman - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/kaisersosa67, Image #2098327

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/kaisersosa67

One morning on my way to work, I grabbed my computer case in my right hand, a fresh cup of coffee in my left, and headed downstairs to the garage to leave to work.

3 Essentials Every Man Must Know to Be an All Pro Dad

This guest post is by Mark Merrill He is president of Family First, host of the nationally-syndicated “Family Minute” radio program, and author of the newly released book, All Pro Dad: Seven Essentials to be a Hero to Your Kids. You can follow Mark on Twitter.

It’s football season! From high school to college to the NFL, men are on the gridiron seeking to win and ultimately become champions. They’re digging, clawing, and giving it all they’ve got to come out on top.

Father Giving His Daughter a Piggyback Ride - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/kupicoo , Image #17129354

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/kupicoo

It should be no different with fatherhood. We need men out there who are in the game—the most important game of their life—working hard and striving toward the goal to be the best they can be, to be All Pro Dads.

Your Power as a Leader

Years ago, I had a very difficult boss. One-on-one he wasn’t a bad guy. He was warm and likable. But in a group—particularly in meetings—he become another person. Dr. Jekyll became Mr. Hyde.

Newton’s Cradle with One Ball About to Be Dropped - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/TommL, Image #17094436

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/TommL

He would suddenly become cold and aloof. If I, or someone on my team, reported good news, he either didn’t acknowledge it or quickly dismissed it.

The 10 Most Common Objections to Hiring a Virtual Assistant

I have been using a virtual executive assistant now for over a year. It’s one of the best business decisions I have ever made. Tricia, my assistant, has enabled me to focus on what I do best and less of what I either don’t do well or don’t enjoy.

A Woman at Work on a Computer - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/TommL, Image #19699722

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/TommL

As a virtual executive assistant, she is really no different than what I was accustomed to in the real world. She can do anything that doesn’t require her physical presence (like running errands or bringing me coffee).

For example: