#031: My Advice to Beginning Bloggers [Podcast]

As a result of my book, Platform: Get Noticed in a Noisy World, and my speaking, I get a lot of e-mail about blogging. People want to know what I advise about getting started. In this episode of the podcast, I answer this question.

Typed Text on a Retro Typewriter - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/Petegar, Image #14310362

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/Petegar

In my book, I share a social media framework. It consists of three parts:

  1. Home base. This is a place in cyberspace that you own and control. For most people, this will be a blog. It could also be a podcast or a video podcast. It is a place where you have 100 percent control of the design and the content—in other words, the branding and the message.
  2. Embassies. These are places in cyberspace you don’t own and control, but where you have a presence. Examples would include Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, Pinterest, etc. Don’t confuse these with a home base. You don’t want to use these as the primary means of delivering your content to the marketplace.
  3. Outposts. These are places in cyberspace you monitor using a tool like Google Alerts.

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8 Leadership Lessons from a Symphony Conductor

A while back, Gail and I went to the Nashville Symphony with our daughter, Mary, and her husband, Chris. Mary had bought tickets for Gail’s birthday. It was a magnificent evening.

The Hands of a Symphony Conductor - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/StudioThreeDots, Image #18995017

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/StudioThreeDots

The orchestra was conducted by the renowned Hugh Wolff. He and the orchestra performed Beethoven’s Concerto No. 4 in G major for Piano and Orchestra. Horacio Guitiérrez played the piano. After the intermission, the orchestra performed Rachmaninoff’s Symphonic Dances, Op. 45.

I Am Not a Leader (or So I Thought)

This is a guest post by Tammy Helfrich. She is a wife, mom, and writer. She currently works for a Fortune 500 company and helps customers implement new processes. You can read her blog or follow her on Twitter.

“I don’t have a leader title.”

“I don’t have anyone who reports to me.”

“I don’t have experience leading people.”

Light Bulb Illustrating Leadership - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/shulz, Image #7320959

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/shulz

I used to say these things, as an excuse. I used to say I am not a leader. I used to believe I was not a leader.

#030: 9 Rules for Leading More Productive Meetings [Podcast]

I have attended hundreds of meetings—maybe a few thousand—and led a few hundred, too. Often, meetings seem like a waste of time.

Group of People in a Serious Meeting from Above - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/francisblack, Image #7198789

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/francisblack

There have been some notable exceptions, and in this episode I talk about what made these meetings different.

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#029: 7 Rules for More Effective Slide Presentations [Podcast]

Whether you are a professional speaker or someone who only makes the occasional presentation, you could be more effective with better slides. In this podcast, I share my seven rules for better presentations.

Presentation With LCD Projector - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/Arand, Image #7610474

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/Arand

I have sat through hundreds of slide presentations, maybe thousands. Some of them were stunning; most of them mind-numbing. I will also share with you from my experience as a professional speaker, who doesn’t have it all figured out but who is committed to never-ending improvement.

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Never Waste a Good Fiasco

This is a guest post by Tyler Ellis. He serves on staff with Newark Church of Christ as a Campus Minister at the University of Delaware. He is also author of the upcoming book, Questions Everything. You can read his blog and follow him on Facebook and Twitter.

Fiascos are inescapable. A change of circumstance. A wild goose chase. An obstacle that thwarts what you had envisioned.

Young Businessman in the Middle of a Fiasco - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/pixdeluxe , Image #12192393

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/pixdeluxe
  • Flights get delayed.
  • Guest speakers cancel.
  • Donors drop support.
  • The flu comes around.
  • Equipment breaks down.

How to Get Your Boss to Say “Yes,” Part 3

The ability to sell an idea or project to your boss is critical to your success. If you can’t get your boss’s approval when you need it, you are not going to go very far in your career. In this three-part series I share six steps for doing it more effectively. In this post, I cover the last two steps. (You can find Part 1 here and Part 2 here.)

In my last post, I wrote about how to prepare to make a presentation to your boss. To get him to say, “yes,” I encouraged you to prepare a brief, written proposal. I even provided a template.

Woman Giving Her Approval on a Proposal - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/nuno, Image #2437760

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/nuno

Once you’ve done that, it’s time to anticipate objections and formulate talking points for each one. Don’t risk getting a “no” because you haven’t carefully thought through the questions and your responses.

How to Get Your Boss to Say “Yes,” Part 2

The ability to sell an idea or project to your boss is critical to your success. If you can’t get your boss’s approval when you need it, you are not going to go very far in your career. In this three-part series I share six steps for doing it more effectively. In this post, I cover the second two steps. (You can find Part 1 here and Part 3 here.)

In my last post, I wrote about the importance of seeing your boss as the customer. To get him to say, “yes,” you have to first understand his needs. Moreover, you have to frame your proposal in terms of how it will help him accomplish his goals.

Man with a Laptop Against a Blackboard - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/mattjeacock, Image #19460301

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/mattjeacock

Then, you have to commit to success. You must be determined to get to “yes,” because your reputation depends on it—first with your boss and second with the people you lead. Once you have taken these first two steps, you are ready for step three.

How to Get Your Boss to Say “Yes,” Part 1

The ability to sell an idea or project to your boss is critical to your success. If you can’t get your boss’s approval when you need it, you are not going to go very far in your career. In this three-part series I share six steps for doing it more effectively. In this post, I cover the first two steps. (You can find Part 2 here and Part 3 here.)

When I was in corporate management, I spent a great deal of time listening to proposals. Those doing the pitching usually needed my approval to proceed with their project. Frankly, I was amazed at how poorly most people do in these kinds of situations.

An "Approved" Rubber Stamp - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/DNY59, Image #6618875

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/DNY59

In fairness, most of us never received any formal training in this important skill. As a result, we flounder about, not knowing why it seems so difficult to get to “yes.”

#026: How to Lead in Turbulent Times [Podcast]

It’s no secret that the last four or five years have been challenging from an economic, technological, and global perspective. In this episode, I discuss five actions leaders must take in order to lead well in turbulent times.

A Ship on a Turbulent Sea

When I speak publicly on this topic, I call this presentation, “Shift: Leading in Turbulent Times.” I use the word “shift” for two reasons:

  1. The world seems to be shifting under our feet.
  2. We must also shift if we are going to lead well.

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