The All New Women of Faith Conference [Video]

Gail and I have attended a Women of Faith Conference every year for the last ten years. That may sound strange since I am a man but stay with me!

Women of Faith is owned by Thomas Nelson. Most of the speakers at the conference are Thomas Nelson authors. So as the former CEO of Thomas Nelson, I had a business reason to attend. (That’s my story, and I’m sticking to it.)

7 Suggestions for Asking More Powerful Questions

When I started out in my career, the key to success was having the right answers. If the boss had a question, he expected me to have the answer—or know where to get it. Those who advanced in their careers the quickest were seemingly the ones who had the most answers.

Questions Flow Chart Being Drawn by a Businessman - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/matspersson0, Image #16588175

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/matspersson0

But as I began to ascend the corporate ladder, I discovered that the key to success began to shift. It became less and less about having the right answers and more and more about having the right questions.

What Would Extending Your Retirement Plans Make Possible?

This is a guest post by Russ Crosson, the President and CEO of Ronald Blue & Co, LLC. He is the author of Your Life Well Spent and The Truth About Money Lies.

If I asked you your “magic number,” chances are you would look at me and wonder what I really meant. Magic number? Is that like a lucky number?

Family of Four on the Floor - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/H-Gall, Image #7889488

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/H-Gall

If, however, I asked for your hoped-for retirement age, I bet a number would quickly pop into your mind. Was it fifty-five, sixty, or sixty-five?

7 Steps to Becoming a Happy Person Others Want to Be Around

Several months ago, my wife, Gail, and I attended an industry mixer at a conference we were attending. Almost immediately, I was cornered by an author who proceeded to complain about all the incompetent people in his life.

Two friends laughing in an outdoor café - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/RuslanDashinsky, Image #15345841

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/RuslanDashinsky

He grumbled about his literary agent, his booking agent, and his publisher. No one, it seems, measured up to his standards. I tried to change the subject, but he persisted.

How Leadership at Home Affects the Rest of Life

I am mostly offline, attending a business conference. I have asked several bloggers to post in my absence. This is a guest post by John G. Miller, author of QBQ! The Question Behind the Question. You can visit his website and follow him on Twitter. If you want to guest post on this blog, check out the guidelines here.

Have you ever heard—or asked—questions like these at work? “Who dropped the ball?” “Why can’t that department do its job right?” “When will we find good people?”

These questions lead us into the dangerous traps of blame, victim thinking, and procrastination—ones that leaders work hard to avoid while on the job.

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/jhorrocks

But what if the person asking these questions was also a parent and later returned to their family, asking: “Who made the mess in here?” “Why won’t he ever listen to me?” “When will my spouse help out more?”

Find Your Mountain

I am mostly offline, attending a business conference. I have asked several bloggers to post in my absence. This is a guest post by Steve Kaplan. He grew a marketing company from start-up to $250 million in sales with offices in 14 countries before selling it for $2.1 billion. You can visit Steve’s blog, follow him on Twitter, or connect with him on Facebook. If you want to guest post on this blog, check out the guidelines here.

When you’re in charge, it’s easy to get accustomed to having the people follow your wisdom simply because you’re the leader.

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/WLDavies

But when was the last time you took a real risk, putting yourself out there with the possibility of failure? Have we become so used to leading that we’ve forgotten what it took to get us there?

Does Your Marriage Have a Mission Statement?

I am mostly offline, attending a business conference. I have asked several bloggers to post in my absence. This is a guest post by Dr. Ann, who is a doctor, wife, and mom. You can visit her blog (which is syndicated on Crosswalk) or follow her on Twitter. If you want to guest post on this blog, check out the guidelines here.

The YMCA has a mission: to improve lives by strengthening spirit, mind and body. Coca Cola has a mission: to refresh the world. Star Trek even had a mission: to boldly go where no man has gone before!

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/LivingImages

What about you and me? Could we do with mission statement for our marriages? Yes, and here’s why: Many of us enter into marriage somewhat blindly.

6 Characteristics of Spiritual Leaders

I am mostly offline, attending a business conference. I have asked several bloggers to post in my absence. This is a guest post by Bob Hamp, the Executive Pastor of Pastoral Care at Gateway Church in Southlake, Texas. You can find his blog or follow him on Twitter. If you want to guest post on this blog, check out the guidelines here.

As believers, we recognize the value of imitating Jesus and His leadership style. But if we really think about it, it’s strange that we try to emulate a leader who never developed an organization, regularly encouraged people to stop following Him, and ultimately saw His death as the pinnacle of His accomplishments.

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/AurelianGogonea

What kind of perspective must a leader have to place high value on these kinds of strategies? Jesus was not a manager. His primary role was to function as a spiritual leader.

3 Important Habits for Building Influence that Matters

I am mostly offline, attending a business conference. I have asked several bloggers to post in my absence. This is a guest post by Jeff Goins, who is an author, speaker, and blogger that lives in Nashville. You can read his blog, follow him on Twitter, and check out his eBook on getting published. If you want to guest post on this blog, check out the guidelines here.

Last year was crazy. In six months, I received a publishing contract, started speaking for live audiences, and launched a writing career—all without having to quit my day job. How did it happen? I built a platform. But what does that mean?

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/mediaphotos

If you want to find and lead your “tribe,” you are going to have to be intentional about the process. The first place to start is with building relationships. I’ve cultivated three important habits that have helped me do this.

The Awesome Power of Showing Appreciation

I am mostly offline, attending a business conference. I have asked several bloggers to post in my absence. This is a guest post by Tracy Letzerich, a stay-at-home mom and former strategy-consultant-turned-algebra-teacher. She blogs at Time With Tracy. You can also follow her on Twitter. If you want to guest post on this blog, check out the guidelines here.

It doesn’t matter whether your office is a boardroom, classroom, or laundry room. There are people who do things for you every day. Employees, colleagues, and family are expected to do their part. Do they know that you appreciate them?

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/aiseeit

It was a typical Monday, and I was about to churn out a business-like email to my husband. Have you heard back from the tax guy? Don’t forget the teacher-parent conference on Thursday. Oh, and the neighbors are irritated because you put the recycle bin out on the wrong day.

In the middle of composing this gem of gentle reminders, a terrible realization came over me: I send a similar email to my husband every Monday. Imagine his excitement when my name appears in his inbox! I began to wonder. Does he know how much I appreciate him?