Leaders and the Game of Life

This is a guest post by Angela Bisignano, Ph.D.. She has a doctorate in clinical psychology and an M.S. in ministry. She works as a leadership and life consultant. You can read her blog and follow her on Twitter. If you want to guest post on this blog, check out the guidelines here.

How important is winning to you? I know I like to win. What’s even more important is how I play the game. The process is key to me.

The Game of Life - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/jml5571, Image #17773700

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/jml5571

For many leaders today, life is moving really fast. Contemplating the process of life is not on the top of many leaders “to do” lists. Yet, process is vital in order to do life well and to finish well. To me finishing well implies much more than just a successful career or ministry. How important is life’s process to you?

3 Ways to Go Further, Faster

Several years ago, I wrote out a list of “100 Things I Want to Do Before I Die.” It’s really an amazing, audacious list. Whenever I review it, I am both inspired and stunned by how many of the items I have already accomplished. And yet, there is so much more. The list keeps growing.

Two Young Boys Racing Their Homemade Cars While Another Cheers Them On - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/RichVintage, Image #16717070

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/RichVintage

I’ll bet you have a list, too. Perhaps you’ve written it down; perhaps not. Regardless, you doubtless want to accomplish things—probably a lot of things. Really important things. Unfortunately, life is short. I have more to accomplish than I could probably do in seven lifetimes.

Embracing Plan B

By nature I am a planner. I plan everything. And then I re-plan. I probably spend 90 percent of my time thinking about the future and planning for it. I consider my strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. I anticipate problems and consider contingencies. I have a Plan A.

A Well-Worn Detour Sign - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/georgeclerk, Image #13522666

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/georgeclerk

But, unfortunately, Plan A rarely happens. When it does, it is awesome. But for me, Plan B is usually the norm. Like an old friend of mine used to say, “Do-do occurs.”

The Difference Between Trying and Doing

There’s an instructive scene in the Star Wars movie, The Empire Strikes Back. Yoda is instructing Luke Skywalker in how to use the Force. He asks Luke to retrieve his disabled spaceship out of a bog where it has sunk, using only his mind.

Luke, of course, thinks this is impossible. Sure, he has been able to move stones around this way. But a spaceship? That’s completely different. Or is it.

How to Compost Your Failures

This is a guest post by Mary DeMuth. She is an author, speaker and book mentor. She has published twelve books, including her most e-book recent, The 11 Secrets of Getting Published, and her most recent novel, The Muir House. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook. If you want to guest post on this blog, check out the guidelines here.

I lamented that I’d let weeds take over my flowerbeds. I didn’t have garbage can space, and my composter died in a windstorm, so I was left with a pile of uprooted weeds. They screamed failure to me.

A Compost Pile - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/jml5571, Image #16223881

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/jml5571

That is, until God whispered, “You can compost them right there. They can mulch the dry soil. Provide natural fertilizer.”

25 Questions to Ask in the First Interview

Yesterday, I described the ideal employee candidate as humble, honest, hungry, and smart. I represented this as a sort of formula: “H3S.” But how do you determine if someone you are interviewing has these qualities?

People Shaking Hands During a Job Interview - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/MichaelDeLeon, Image #6492382

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/MichaelDeLeon

I have a list of questions that I use during my first interview with a candidate. It has evolved over time, as I have gained more experience. I don’t ask every question in every interview; rather I keep it on my lap as a reference.

What Should You Look for in the People You Hire?

Most leaders I’ve met want to build a high-performance organization. Instinctively, they know that this requires great people. But few of them have ever taken the time to define exactly what they are looking for when it comes to the ideal candidate.

A Super Hero Candidate - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/emyerson, Image #1785848

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/emyerson

Good leaders begin the recruiting process with a written job description. This generally includes the required educational experience and technical skills. But great leaders need to do more than this. They must take a step back and look at the baseline qualities of the candidate.

The One Essential Habit of Every Effective Leader

This is a guest post by Jeff Goins. Jeff is a writer who works for Adventures in Missions. You can follow him on Twitter and download a free copy of his eBook The Writer’s Manifesto. If you want to guest post on this blog, check out the guidelines here.

I once heard Dave Ramsey share the secret to his effective leadership and decision-making strategy: ”I make a decision, and if it’s the wrong one, I make another one.”

Standing Man with Two Choices - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/eyetoeyePIX, Image #17906987

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/eyetoeyePIX

Here was my thought process in reaction to that statement:

  • That’s ludicrous.
  • That’s reckless. 
  • That’s… genius.

How to Be Better Prepared for Your Next Major Presentation

“Hi. My name is Michael, and I’m a prepaholic.” If there was a support group for people who over-prepare, I would be a charter member.

A Microphone Stand in Front of an Out of Focus Audience - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/RapidEye, Image #15805678

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/RapidEye

In my prior role as a CEO, much of my job involved making presentations—to boards, banks, investors, authors, agents, customers, employees, vendors, the media—you name it. Now, as a professional speaker, it represents most of my life. Each one of these engagements is an opportunity to connect with the audience and make a good “brand impression—or a bad one.

Practicing the Attitude of Gratitude

Several years ago, at the encouragement of a friend, I started carrying a gratitude rock in my pocket. It’s really just a small, smooth stone that I picked up from the fish pond behind our house. I carry it with me where ever I go.

A Stone in a Hand - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/jaminwell, Image #12120864

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/jaminwell

The idea is simple. Whenever my hand contacts the stone–usually several times a day–I give thanks for whatever is happening at that moment, whether good or bad.

Make Plans Now to Attend the Chick-fil-A Leadercast 2012

I attend more leadership conferences than anyone I know, especially now that I am speaking professionally. It is simply amazing how many events leaders have to choose from today.

But the Chick-fil-A Leadercast is still at the top of my list. Perhaps this is because I have hosted the Leadercast Backstage program where I have had the privilege of interviewing all the speakers on video. As a group, they are second to none.