Help Change the World for As Little As $25

My daughter Megan and her husband, Joel, have decided to adopt a baby. From Uganda! I am so proud of them.

Two African Children Holding Up a Hope Sign - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/MShep2, Image #13551372

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/MShep2

Ever since Gail and I visited Ethiopia a few years ago, we have had a passion for children born into poverty. I can’t imagine what it would be like grow up without parents. Doing it while trying to get enough clean water and food to survive sounds impossible.

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The Apostle James said, “Pure and undefiled religion before God and the Father is this: to visit orphans and widows in their trouble, and to keep oneself unspotted from the world” (1:27).

Amazingly, experts estimate that there are 147 million orphans worldwide. That number boggles my mind. How can we possibly help all these children? The sad truth is, we can’t.

But just because we can’t help everyone doesn’t mean we can’t help someone. As my friend Mary Graham is fond of saying, “You may not be able to change the world, but you can change the world for one child.”

As you probably know, adoption is an expensive process. In Megan and Joel’s case, it is going to cost them some $23,000 (click here for the expense breakdown).

They have personally contributed $3,000 toward the cause. Our family and friends have contributed another $6,000. That still leaves $14,000 to reach their goal of $23,000.

I am committed to raising $10,000 of the total myself. To do that, I am participating in a 10K trail race in Chattanooga, Tennessee on Saturday, December 18, 2011. Would you help by sponsoring me in this run?

You can do so by making a 100% tax-deductible contribution to Lifesong for Orphans, the organization that Megan and Joel are working with. I need approximately:

  • 400 people to donate $25 = $10,000
  • 200 people to donate $50 = $10,000
  • 100 people to donate $100 = $10,000
  • 50 people to donate $200 = $10,000
  • 25 people to donate $400 = $10,000
  • 10 people to donate $1,000 = $10,000

If you are willing to help with any size gift, please CLICK HERE to donate.

Question: What experience do you have with adoption? You can leave a comment by clicking here.
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  • http://twitter.com/TesTeq TesTeq

    Tough decision. How can you choose one child only if millions are waiting for help?

    • http://gailbhyatt.wordpress.com/ Gail Hyatt

      You are right. It is a very tough decision. Thankfully, like Mike referred to above, one person may not be able to change the world, but we can change the world for one person. There are also additional ways to help larger groups of people. I’m glad it’s not either-or, but both-and. Thanks so much for your thoughts.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      That’s why I said, “But just because we can’t help everyone doesn’t mean we can’t help someone. As my friend Mary Graham is fond of saying, ‘You may not be able to change the world, but you can change the world for one child.’” Thanks.

    • http://bretmavrich.posterous.com/ Bret Mavrich

      Adoption is a radical statement that challenges everyone involved. True, it confronts us with our profound weakness: how can I make a difference?

      But then it confronts the rest of us living comfortably in the western world: the only way to make a difference is that we all–and I mean the church–seriously consider embracing the lifestyle of adoption.

      I’m uncomfortable. Im provoked. Thanks, Hyatts.

    • Eric Shanfelt

      Good question! This story helped me with that …

      After a large storm, tens of thousands of starfish were washed ashore on a beach as far as the eye could see. A young man watched for hours as an old man went up the beach, stopping every few seconds to throw a starfish as far as he could back into the ocean. Eventually the young man went down and asked the man, “Why are you doing this? You can’t possibly make a difference with so many starfish washed up.” The old man bent down, picked up another starfish and threw it into the ocean. He then looked at the young man and said, “It made a difference to that one!”

      • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

        I love that story, Eric. I remember hearing it years ago, and it really resonated with me.

        Thanks also for visiting with us today. I loved meeting you. Your energy was contagious!

    • Christian

      Talk about a tough decision! So glad they’re taking action though, despite how tough it is.

      Think about this: you are clearly a priviledged person. After all, here you are on the internet, reading a blog, engaging in discussion. You know how to read, and you know how to write. You have education. You have access to a computer. And I’m sure you have a lot more than that.

      Now imagine if this was only so because someone, in the past, had decided it was worth a shot to help you. Imagine if all you had today was due to someone making the courage to reach out for you. You wouldn’t have been where you are today, if it wasn’t for them. What would you say about that?

      Even if there are so many people needing help, that absolutely does not mean we should be paralyzed about reaching out, even if for just a single one. To this one child, life is going to be so incredibly different! Really, it’s LIVES we’re talking about here. Such an impact in ONE life is a HUGE thing. It is absolutely worth every penny, and every drop of sweat required to make it happen.

      It’s such a great thing, in fact, I think you can only grasp how huge it is when you try and put yourself in this lucky kid’s shoes. It just goes beyond words how much of an awesome thing it is.

    • http://www.justcris.com Cristiane Ferreira

      In my opinion, the really tough decision is doing something about it or just sitting by. When we decide to act and do something, even the smallest thing makes a big difference for someone who needs it.
      Michael, there’s no greater joy for a parent than to see their children choosing to act and do something about it. I pray that God, who put this urge to act in your daughter’s and her husband’s heart, will continue guiding them through this “new adventure”. God bless you all!

    • TH

      You don’t choose one. You start with one. Mother Theresa’s approach was just that – start with one…

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  • http://bretmavrich.posterous.com/ Bret Mavrich

    At the very moment I read this post, I’m sitting in a worship/prayer meeting focused on the release of the spirit of adoption upon the church in America. Timely word, Mike.

    http://www.ihop.org/Publisher/Article.aspx?ID=1000058181

  • Michael Gray

    The adoption of our son has been the most memorable experience of my life. It taught me that I can pine for my own way all I want (in this case, conceiving a child) , but if I just wait on God, his plan is always better than anything I can think up. I think you said once that God has no Plan B. I’m glad my plans A, B, C, and D never made it to reality, because this is much more of a blessing.

    Count me in for $25. I know it’s not much, but every dollar helps. I look forward to hearing more about the adoption in months to come.

  • SueB

    I have two nieces that are adopted – both are beautiful women, now. Well worth it. I am very close to one of them – never even think of her as adopted.

    • http://bretmavrich.posterous.com/ Bret Mavrich

      Sue,

      That last part really made me think. I’ve got a niece and nephew who are adopted and I never think of them as anything less than a full-fleged member of the family. I think that says something important about the heart of adoption.

    • http://bretmavrich.posterous.com/ Bret Mavrich

      Sue,

      That last part really made me think. I’ve got a niece and nephew who are adopted and I never think of them as anything less than a full-fleged member of the family. I think that says something important about the heart of adoption.

  • Brad

    We’re adopting a special needs child from India. The process is long and difficult but we know it will be worth it. Adoption is the opportunity to provide hope. And as I like to think, all of us Christians are adoptees as well.

  • Ashley Musick

    I think this is great! I’ve been working with orphanages around the world in missions for the past several years, and could think of no better use of somebody’s money, time, and love. There are just so many kids who need love. Thanks for caring for the one. Praying for your family as you raise the funds and as you prepare to see God’s provision and love in expanding your family.

  • http://dominiceidson.com/ Dominic Eidson

    My experience with adoption? I was adopted.

    My 16 year old mother-to-be realized that she would not be able to care for me and gave me up for adoption, in spite of her family’s pressure to have an abortion.

    God was watching over me long before I realized it.

    (Michael: On a side note, the link in “… You can leave a comment by clicking here.” is incorrect.)

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Thanks for the heads-up on the link. I think I have it working now. Thanks also for your story!

  • Angie Weldy

    My three children are all adopted from South Korea. Some people wonder if you can love a child not born to you the same way as a biological child. This year my oldest who is almost 10 was thought to have a possibly life-threatening heart problem. While we were going through the storm of that the thought occurred to me, “If people could feel what it’s like to wonder if your child is critically ill, they would know that you absolutely can love a child with your entire heart even if you didn’t carry him in your stomach.” It still brings me to tears to think about those weeks but I am so happy to say that he does NOT have that condition – not even borderline! I am still praising God for answering our prayers and tonight my son is having his 10th birthday party!

  • Marilyn

    Michael,

    Could you please clarify your thinking here? I interpret what you’ve written to imply that donations are designated to your daughter and son-in-law’s adoption expenses.

    If so, I’m not following you. My guess is that you have an income that places you in the top 1% or 2% of all wage earners in the U.S., so are in a position to gift the entire amount to your daughter and son-in-law.

    Many prospective adoptive parents are not so fortunate. It’s those adoptive parents who need our help, not your family. Right? But, again, perhaps I’m misunderstanding the terms of this fund-raising appeal?

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      No, I cannot fund the entire amount myself. Neither can my daughter or son-in-law. We are raising the money to facilitate the adoption, so that at least one child can be raised in a home with real parents. Thanks.

    • http://twitter.com/MegHMiller Megan Hyatt Miller

      Marilyn,

      I appreciate your perspective. Like my dad said, none of us can fund this adoption on our own, contrary to what it may seem like. I’m so thankful we can’t. Here’s why: fundraising for our adoption has allowed us to have so many people become part of the story God is writing in our family and community through this baby. My family has prayed from the beginning that God would use this adoption for bigger purposes than just growing our family and helping one child–we pray HE would use it to inspire others to consider the cause of the orphan and also, to think it’s possible for an ordinary family to adopt and fund their adoption without debt. The financial burden is the biggest reason people don’t follow through on adoption. Frankly, it was one of the most daunting aspects for us at the beginning too. It is our prayer that others would watch God provide in a visible, powerful way, and believe He will do the same for them.

      Blessings to you!
      Megan

      • http://bretmavrich.posterous.com/ Bret Mavrich

        Megan,

        That’s so biblical it’s not even funny. 2 Cor 9:12-13, Paul launches a giving initiative from one church to another, and the result is more people rejoice in what God is doing.

        We can’t wait to “overflow in thanksgiving to God” with you as you bring your little one home.

    • http://bretmavrich.posterous.com/ Bret Mavrich

      I there’s an important justice issue that you’re hitting on, Marilyn, and that is that finances should not be a barrier to adoption. It is abominable that willing families would have to scrape together upwards of $20K (sometimes more) just to get their foot in the door. A friend of mine, @rbohlender (twitter) runs a program called Hannah’s Dream, a team of adoption advocates that helps Christian couples find adoption options for a fraction of the “normal” cost. We need an army of such organizations to spring up so that we can funnel millions of these kids into loving homes, regardless of the income bracket. (http://www.hannahsdream.com/)

  • http://www.caraputman.com Cara Putman

    Our church is in the middle of a new ministry based on James 1:27. It’s been exciting to watch adoptions explode (at least for our small congregation) and to watch the heart of God for orphans and widows (single moms) grow. The need is so big it’s hard to know where to start. But we have to start. And Adoption is a great way to do that.

  • http://www.jeffrandleman.com Jeff Randleman

    My wife and I have been trying to adopt for several years. Our story is full of drama and excitement, and also very long. Here’s the short version: we originally wanted to adopt a girl from China, maybe even a special needs child. But we don’t make enough money to qualify for Chinese adoption, since we already (at the time) had three kids. I’m in ministry. I don’t make a great amount. So we switched to Vietnam. They have a rule stating that you can’t adopt within a year of a live birth. Ok, no problem. So we started the process. And then had child #4. And then 18 months after that, child #5 is on the way, due next month. I’m guessing God has other plans for us right now…

    So, we can relate to the ups and downs of emotions during the process. We’ve been there; are still there. My wife and I have decided that we will consider adding to your support base. We will talk it over and pray about it this weekend and have a decision reached by Monday.

    Thanks for being so visible with this. It’s an encouragement to us!

  • Alison @ Ingredients, Inc.

    wow amazing post. I have chills

  • http://jeffgoins.myadventures.org Jeff Goins

    We’ve been sponsoring some kids thru World Vision and Holt for a number of years. In addition to that, once we start our family, we would really like to adopt.

    I love God’s heart for the orphan — it really speaks to his passion for the fatherless, which we all are (or have been).

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Gail and I love World Vision. We have sponsored several children. Rich Stearns is the President of World Vision, U.S. He has written a wonderful book called The Hole in Our Gospel. If you haven’t read it, I highly recommend it. Thanks.

      • http://jeffgoins.myadventures.org Jeff Goins

        Yep, I read it… thanks to the BookSneeze program! Wrote a review on it, as well.

      • http://jeffgoins.myadventures.org Jeff Goins

        Yep, I read it… thanks to the BookSneeze program! Wrote a review on it, as well.

  • http://twitter.com/MegHMiller Megan Hyatt Miller

    Dad, thanks for your willingness to step into this with us. God is up to something big with our family. I can’t wait to see how He will use it for the Kingdom in bigger ways than we know. I love you!

  • http://mozosonmission.blogspot.com/ Amy

    My family has 2 children from my womb and one from my heart (Ethiopia). When we started the process, I had someone ask how we would pay for it when we did not have the money. (We were missionaries at a mission in the US at the time.) I told them that we did not have the money, but God does. He provided a way! It was work and fundraisers and generous donations but we have the most beautiful son who has been in our family almost 2 years. I can not get over how much of a blessing he is and how well he fits. (Now, we live in South America and are praying for God’s direction if He has another addition to our family.) May your daughter and here husband be blessed beyond measure by their child that is waiting for them.

  • http://mozosonmission.blogspot.com/ Amy

    My family has 2 children from my womb and one from my heart (Ethiopia). When we started the process, I had someone ask how we would pay for it when we did not have the money. (We were missionaries at a mission in the US at the time.) I told them that we did not have the money, but God does. He provided a way! It was work and fundraisers and generous donations but we have the most beautiful son who has been in our family almost 2 years. I can not get over how much of a blessing he is and how well he fits. (Now, we live in South America and are praying for God’s direction if He has another addition to our family.) May your daughter and here husband be blessed beyond measure by their child that is waiting for them.

  • http://charlesjaymeyer.blogspot.com Charles Meyer

    My biological father was actually adopted when he was 3. So that really changed his life and the direction that he was going.

    Also my stepfather adopted my older brother and me when I was young also. I must say that man has a been great gift in my life. I couldn’t imagine where I would be if he wasn’t in my moms life when I was born. It’s a beautiful story!

  • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

    Mike! Greetings from India. I can share my country context with regard to adoption. Adoption is a very cumbersome process in India. It involves too many legal processes and procedural regulations here (as Brad says). Hence, in India, adoption is prevalent only among affluent and influential people. To make matters worse, many from our society considers adoption as odd and strange behavior. Thus, adoption happens at a very slower pace in my country. Thanks. Uma

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Thanks for this insight Uma. I wasn’t aware of this.

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  • Cassie

    I’m interested in how you became involved with Lifesong for Orphans. My family has been very involved with them from the beginning, back when they were called Life International.

  • http://successbeginstoday.org/wordpress John Richardson

    Adoption seems like a win-win in so many circumstances. I just can’t understand why it is so expensive, takes so long, and is so hard to do. I’m sure this child will be a blessing to your family. Thank you for giving us an opportunity to be part of the process.

  • Curtis Yates

    Mike,

    I am so excited about Megan and Joel’s adoption – about how it will impact them, their child, and your entire family, forever. And I’m thrilled with the visibility you are giving to the cause of the orphan here on your blog.

    As I think you are aware, my wife and I adopted from Ethiopia a couple years ago. When we were weighing over the decision, we got to a point where she was extremely confident that we were supposed to adopt. And while I was convinced as well, I was struggling with pulling the trigger because of the overwhelming cost (our adoption was estimated to cost between $25,000 and $30,000 and ended up costing more). I had no hesitations about taking on the financial responsibility of raising another child (we already had two), but I just couldn’t see how we would be able to finance the adoption itself without breaking the bank.

    I began praying in earnest about this situation. I wanted God to make it abundantly clear (like by putting it in writing) that He was in this and that He would provide for our family. As much as I prayed and listened, I never heard the clear answer I was seeking. However, during this time I read John Ortberg’s book If You Want to Walk on Water, You’ve Got to Get Out of the Boat, a book about taking risk and living by faith. There were a number of places in the book where I sensed God speaking to me, but none as clearly as when Ortberg asks, “Is there any challenge in your life right now that is large enough that you have no hope of doing it apart from God’s help? If not, consider the possibility that you are seriously underchallenged.” I was convicted. It became clear to me that God wanted me to step out in faith. He wasn’t going to provide the handwritten assurance I had been seeking. He was going to use this experience to grow my faith. Besides, I was confident that God had put the burden for orphans on both our hearts. And He’s quite clear in scripture about his desire for us to care for them. Was it reasonable for me to think that God wasn’t “in this”? That He wouldn’t provide for us and this child?

    We then started the process and began cutting sizable checks. We also set up a fundraising program similar to what Megan and Joel are doing. We let some friends and family know of the opportunity to help us finance an expensive adoption. We were totally blown away when God used a number of folks to provide over half of our adoption expenses!

    If I had known on the front end that we would receive all this financial assistance, I would have had no hesitation in starting the adoption process. But God apparently wanted to provide me with a lesson in living by faith. I needed to know Who was providing all those funds. Looking back, I am so grateful for the experience. God is good!

    May God bless Megan and Joel for stepping out in faith. Count us in for $100.

  • http://www.gospellab.com Gospel lab

    When we were missionaries in Latvia, my wife would go to the orphanage just to hold the babies and spend time with them. Many of the orphans were left alone in their cribs and as a result were not developing proper muscle skills. One day she held a 9 month old boy who could not even hold his head up or sit properly in her lap.

    These babies would also lack the proper human contact that is needed for healthy growth. Imagine being born into the world and then just laying in a crib by yourself most of the day.

    God does have a special heart for the orphans of the world. If you want to touch God’s heart, then touch an orphan.

  • http://twitter.com/davidteems David Teems

    And those who contribute become the community around the child. A kind of godparent. We’re in.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Thanks, David!

  • amy

    My husband and I have adopted 3 children in the past 2 1/2 years adding to our already 3 bio kids…now we have 6KIDS!!! I am very passionate about adoption…. and we are in no way financially able to throw out $25k very easily….BUT there are amazing tax credits that are available for adoption… We barely scrape by, but adoption is not expensive if you can open your heart to raising another child… The us govt gives a tax CREDIT (not deduction of $13k) and most states give you half of that amount on top… and tons of corporations give adoption assistance and people don’t even know about it… so unless you daughter makes more than $150k a year she should be able to get reimbursed for most of the adoption expenses… I think of it as “floating” a rather large expense, not all out paying it…. Just something I hope she knows about.. without this we would have never been able to adopt once…let alone 3 Special needs children in 2 years!!! They are an absolute blessings…. good luck to your kids…awesome

  • http://twitter.com/toddburkhalter Todd Burkhalter

    Michael,
    I am certain that you must be a proud parent. It will be great to be able to learn about these children throughout the process. My families prayers will be with you all. I would encourage you to watch Andy Stanley’s sermon this past week in the Thrill of Hope series. It has a great reference to adoption in the message.

  • http://twitter.com/toddburkhalter Todd Burkhalter

    Michael,
    I am certain that you must be a proud parent. It will be great to be able to learn about these children throughout the process. My families prayers will be with you all. I would encourage you to watch Andy Stanley’s sermon this past week in the Thrill of Hope series. It has a great reference to adoption in the message.

  • TH

    Ok – I am going to be a little radical here – but I do speak from experience so I am gonna weigh in. Not trying to offend at all – trying to understand.

    First off – congratulations to your daughter and her family on their decision to adopt. I applaud them.

    My wife and I have been through the adoption process 4 times. First in China. We paid everything but travel fees and then it came to a screeching halt. While waiting – we paid for another entire adoption to bring our son home from Ethiopia. He passed away while in his orphanage so we continued that process to bring home our daughter from Ethiopia. A year later we pulled our dossier from China (losing all of the money spent on that) and started the process to bring our next daughter home from Ethiopia (she should be home by March).

    So now – on to funding. We paid for everything on our own. No fundraising. No asking for people to support us. I think a few people gave us some small gifts of money but 99.999% of it was paid by us. Because we could do it. because God called us to use what He gave us to work for His kingdom. We are by NO MEANS wealthy – at all. If anything we’ve been okay stewards of the resources God has blessed us with – but wealthy – nope.

    So I am curious around the fundraising. I don’t know anything about your daughters situation but I could venture a guess that the CEO of a major publishing company could “probably” afford to bankroll his daughters entire adoption if he so desired.

    So what gives? Is it a way to engage others? Is it an advocacy approach to adoption? if thats the case is this adoption seen as mission work by your daughter?

    Just curious. I have often felt that funds available through grants and other means should be left for those who most definitely needed them…

    Just very curious… (on another note – i wanna run that race with ya and I’ll donate towards their adoption as well)…

  • TH

    Ok – I am going to be a little radical here – but I do speak from experience so I am gonna weigh in. Not trying to offend at all – trying to understand.

    First off – congratulations to your daughter and her family on their decision to adopt. I applaud them.

    My wife and I have been through the adoption process 4 times. First in China. We paid everything but travel fees and then it came to a screeching halt. While waiting – we paid for another entire adoption to bring our son home from Ethiopia. He passed away while in his orphanage so we continued that process to bring home our daughter from Ethiopia. A year later we pulled our dossier from China (losing all of the money spent on that) and started the process to bring our next daughter home from Ethiopia (she should be home by March).

    So now – on to funding. We paid for everything on our own. No fundraising. No asking for people to support us. I think a few people gave us some small gifts of money but 99.999% of it was paid by us. Because we could do it. because God called us to use what He gave us to work for His kingdom. We are by NO MEANS wealthy – at all. If anything we’ve been okay stewards of the resources God has blessed us with – but wealthy – nope.

    So I am curious around the fundraising. I don’t know anything about your daughters situation but I could venture a guess that the CEO of a major publishing company could “probably” afford to bankroll his daughters entire adoption if he so desired.

    So what gives? Is it a way to engage others? Is it an advocacy approach to adoption? if thats the case is this adoption seen as mission work by your daughter?

    Just curious. I have often felt that funds available through grants and other means should be left for those who most definitely needed them…

    Just very curious… (on another note – i wanna run that race with ya and I’ll donate towards their adoption as well)…

    • TH

      And again – seriously – not trying to offend at all – really curious. if it is an advocacy approach I love it – I am all about engaging others who may otherwise never ever get involve din orphan care. Anxious to hear your thoughts – its something we MAY consider in the future as well (fundraising for adoptions)…

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      My daughter is actually writing a guest post on this very topic. (I plan to post it later this week.) Her philosophy is that anything worth doing is worth doing with others. It creates more visibility for the cause and gives the community an opportunity to participate. Thanks.

      • TH

        Thanks Michael – I look forward to her post. I much like the idea of involving community and getting the word out about orphan care. I sometimes struggle with having someone financially invest in my family and children… thats likely my fiercely independent side coming out…

        No matter how ya slice it – what your family is embarking on is AWESOME and you guys will run smack into God in this because He lives in the middle of adoption. He lives in the middle of orphans. He cares so much about them that His inspired word describes pure, true religion only one time and it is in regards to caring for orphans…

        I met him anew in our process and He has never let go or let down. Good luck to you guys…

      • http://bretmavrich.posterous.com/ Bret Mavrich

        I can’t wait to read this post. Your daughter’s “philosophy” is so biblical its not even funny. Fundraising isn’t just about supplying need: it’s about the community of faith rejoicing in greater numbers and at greater depths in the marvelous things God is doing among them.

  • http://twitter.com/doughibbard Doug Hibbard

    We’re in to help out. I think we’re looking through state channels, which will not have quite the upfront costs (or travel needs!). May you be blessed as you run.

    And maybe find some cash on the path.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Thanks, Doug. I am grateful for the help!

  • Laurie

    God has been stirring my heart throughout this year about orphans, since a missions trip I took to Ethiopia in April. I’m single, so I’m not sure adoption is part of God’s plans for me, (although I am considering it and praying about it), but I have joined with a few other people at my church to start an orphan care ministry. I was overwhelmed to learn how many orphans there are in this world. I have to do something to help these little ones, even if it’s just serving in this new ministry. I donated, and applaud you for adopting and letting others be a part of what God is doing in your lives. God bless!

  • Tory Satter

    Michael…your heart is evident in your post. Thanks for sharing. What an amazing journey lies ahead! We have been riding the adoption rollercoaster for several years now. In 2005 we got a baby through foster care. We thought we were going to be able to adopt him, but 9 months later he was placed with extended family. We were devasted. Then God gave us a little boy and girl we were able to adopt in 2007. In 2008 two brothers were placed in our home through foster care. We are hoping to adopt them, but things are stalled in the courts (they have been in our home for 2 1/2 years). We don’t know what the future holds, but are grateful for every day we get to love them and share Jesus with them. It has been a crazy rollercoaster, but I wouldn’t change it for anything!

  • Michael

    God has blessed us with four beautiful adopted children. We couldn’t be bigger advocates for adoption — not only to give a child a home, but more as an awesome platform for God to demonstrate His sovereign power and goodness! We are blessed beyond words. But yes, it is expensive. God provided in very different ways for each of the first three adoptions, and now for the fourth (our son just turned two today) we are still working on paying down the expense. I salute you for stepping up and supporting your children in this. I’m guessing that the care and involvement your efforts represent mean as much or more than the monetary contribution you’re raising.

  • http://www.christopherscottblog.typepad.com/ Christopher Scott

    My girlfriend used to work for Bethany Christian Services as an international adoption social worker. She loved the work and hopes to get back to it again.

    Hearing stories and seeing her passion for international adoption is very encouraging. There are so many kids in need, if anyone is able to adopt just one child, that will make such a difference.

  • http://www.AFriendInTheStorm.com Cheryl Ricker

    I’m thrilled for your family! What a wonderful, selfless choice. No wonder why you’re proud of your daughter. The neat thing is: she’ll probably inspire more people to make that choice. I pray fresh blessings on your growing family. May everything work out smoothly. Thanks for sharing.

  • Kimberly

    Please congratulate your daughter Megan and husband Joel on their pending adoption! As an adoptive mom I can tell you that there is nothing like God choosing a child for you through adoption. I am the author of a children’s book that is called Our Chosen Child – Talking to Children About Inter-Cultural Adoption. I’d love to send them a copy!

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  • http://sunbelttexas.blogspot.com Dan Elliott

    Mr. Hyatt,
    You might be interested in Businesses for Orphans, I know the fine young people (in their 20s) working hard for the orphans of India. It’s a cause to u micro-fund small businesses and use profits for orphans http://www.businessfororphans.com/www.businessfororphans.com/Welcome.html

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