How Do Busy Leaders Find Time for Social Media?

On Wednesday, I made a presentation at Catalyst West on the subject of “Platform: What It Is, Why You Need It, and How to Build It.” When I finished, I opened my presentation for Q&A. Finally, after about 20 minutes of lively discussion, I indicated that we had time for one more question. Someone asked, “How does a busy CEO—someone like you—find time for social media?”

A Very Busy Man Attempting to Multi-Task To Get It All Done - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/tzara, Image #250015

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/tzara

Great question. Frankly, I get this a lot.

On Tuesday, I spoke to a group of CEOs at the Christian Leadership Alliance on “Social Media and Your Ministry.” Different audience, similar presentation. However, because it was an audience of CEOs, the question about finding time was the first question out of the gate.

It is an important question. Why? Because increasingly CEOs, pastors, and other leaders are being asked by their staff, constituents, and even boards about their “social media involvement.” Most leaders I have spoken with, still don’t see the value or, if they do, know how to work it into their workflow. They already feel overwhelmed with their current responsibilities; they aren’t looking for one more thing to do.

Here’s how I answered the question on both days.

First of all, if you see engaging in social media as simply one more thing you must add to an already overwhelming list of responsibilities, it won’t happen. Blogging, Twitter, or Facebook, can’t simply be another add-on activity. You and I both know that you don’t have time for one more thing. (In fact, if you are honest, you are struggling to keep up with what you have on your plate now.)

Instead, you have to see the use of social media as an integral part of your job. It has to be a tool that enables you to accomplish your work—your real work—more effectively and more efficiently. But what is your real work as a leader?

It probably includes a dozen things. It will be a little different for everyone. But here are five that probably should be on every leader’s list:

  1. Raise your organization’s visibility. You can do this the expensive way by employing traditional, interruption-based marketing. Unfortunately, fewer and fewer people are paying attention. They are very selective about who they give permission to speak into their lives. This is why the use of social media is so effective. The only people listening are people who choose to follow you and become part of your tribe.
  2. Articulate your organization’s vision. As a leader, you can’t do this too much. Vision is to your organization what blood is to your body: it gives it life. The problem is that it is difficult to be constantly articulating the vision to everyone. Besides, it’s not just your own people that need to know it. Your constituents need to understand it as well. Social media, particularly blogging, provides a perfect delivery vehicle for this.
  3. Network with people who can help you. One of reasons you are probably in your position is that over the years you have acquired a network of invaluable contacts. This is one of the secrets of your success—you’ve been able to tap into this network when you need to accomplish more than you could do on your own. Social media take this to next level. I have dozens and dozens of people that I now know, work with, and count on that I first met via social media. My network is larger and richer than ever.
  4. Be alert to what your constituents are saying. Again, you can do this the expensive way by employing traditional market research. I still think there is a place for that. But there is nothing like understanding first-hand what your customers and constituents are saying. HootSuite, Google Alerts, and other tools give you that opportunity for free—in real-time. Like it or not, there is a conversation happening right now about you, your brand, and our company online. Social media provide an opportunity for you to participate in that conversation, learn from it, and even influence it.
  5. Mentor the next generation of leaders. This is why I originally started blogging. I found that I kept dispensing the same stories and advice over and over again. Blogging gives me the opportunity to curate my best ideas, archive them, and share them with those I am charged with leading. Twitter is similar. I use it to direct my followers to links and other resources I believe they will find helpful. Best of all, these tools have extended my leadership and my circle of influence.

So, how do you find time for social media in your already busy life? By beginning to see them as tools that help you achieve your objectives as a leader. If you grasp the potential and connect it with your vision, making time for social media will be much easier.

Question: How do you find time for social media? What does your typical social media day look like?
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  • http://twitter.com/jalc6927 @jalc6927

    I find time by using programs like hoot suite and Ping. I can manage all my tools from one website using them. My typical social media day starts by posting a new blog by 0530. I monitor other blogs up to about 0600. As the day progresses I answer blog comments and monitor my pages using hoot suite. I finish the day by preparing my blog before I go to sleep.
    My recent post Guest Blogger James Castellano: Shoot for Effectiveness with Your Employees and Efficiency Will Follow

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      That's very similar to my workflow. Thanks for sharing!

    • http://intensedebate.com/profiles/mattedmundson Matt Edmundson

      Love hoot suite – very very helpful (it's better on the mac than pc). What do you use to monitor blogs? I am getting more and more into google reader – but open to suggestions if there is something better (I love the share function on google reader as you can easily add this to your own blog and facebook page).
      My recent post Stagetex – the first 20 months of being in business

    • http://twitter.com/abrahamthomas Abraham

      Thank you so much for this tip. This really helped me. Abraham

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  • http://principlesoffailure.blogspot.com Siddhartha Herdegen

    It needs to be integrated but not the focus of your day. You could spend all day reading blogs and responding to incoming messages.

    My advice: set a few minutes aside each hour to check on SM, you'll stay engaged but you won't be constantly interrupted by a new comment or tweet.

    There are new sites that can help you quickly get up to speed on what you missed while you were away from Twitter.
    My recent post When Was the Last Time You Cleaned Up Your Email Contacts?

  • http://www.theleadershipcoach.com Paul Andrew

    Thanks Michael. Though I'm not a CEO of a large team, I own my own business, travel regularly and have three young children. So I find similar challenges in making the time (rather than "finding" the time) for social media. You've brought great clarity to the priorities that have kept me engaged in social media so actively, and articulated them so well. Cheers, Paul
    My recent post Airbrushes, Avatars and Authenticity

  • http://www.theleadershipcoach.com Paul Andrew

    Thanks Michael. Though I'm not a CEO of a large team, I own my own business, travel regularly and have three young children. So I find similar challenges in making the time (rather than "finding" the time) for social media. You've brought great clarity to the priorities that have kept me engaged in social media so actively, and articulated them so well. Cheers, Paul
    My recent post Airbrushes, Avatars and Authenticity

  • http://www.theleadershipcoach.com Paul Andrew

    Thanks Michael. Though I'm not a CEO of a large team, I own my own business, travel regularly and have three young children. So I find similar challenges in making the time (rather than "finding" the time) for social media. You've brought great clarity to the priorities that have kept me engaged in social media so actively, and articulated them so well. Cheers, Paul
    My recent post Airbrushes, Avatars and Authenticity

  • http://www.twitter.com/danieldecker Daniel Decker

    Very well said! Thank you for sharing and articulating this in this way. I've just passed this on to several leaders. :)
    My recent post DanielDecker: It's a great Friday when I hear we've confirmed several thousand pre-sales of a book, a month before it publishes! Yay!

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      Thanks, Daniel. I basically wrote it for that purpose, knowing that people are trying to convince themselves, their bosses, or their boards.

      • Brandon Smith

        Working in the utility industry… I've given presentations and had MANY phone calls about the importance of it, and I'm glad to say that I'm starting to make some progress. The only problem is that when they hear about Social Media from someone younger that knows a lot about SM (Me), they have a tendency take my ideas and then try to recreate the wheel….adding typical corporate complexity, wanting to get IT involved, waiting for a few months to draft a "social media policy", etc….

        Either way, SM is very important for anyone and can be of value to any company! You just need to open the mind and figure out how. :)
        My recent post Don’t Recreate the Wheel, Be the Dragon Slayer

        • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

          This is exactly why I don't have a social media policy at my company. We've never had a lick of trouble.

          So many execs would do far better just to jump in the water and start swimming!

  • http://www.christopherhopper.com Chrstopher Hopper

    While watching 24 on Monday night, my friend @gregglovins told me, “The only person that makes you look unproductive in a day is Jack Bauer.” (It spawned this morning's blog post, interestingly enough).

    But to answer your question, my iPhone has become my main means of communication. Simply put, it's so handy. People often tell me, "You're *always* on Twitter and FaceBook! I could never do that." And yet they're surprised to find out I spend no more than 45 minutes on it during the entire course of my day. I'm selective and deliberate with my time, and resist needless ADD surfing.

    I've never tried HootieSuite, so that's next on my agenda. Thanks Michael. ch:
    My recent post Jack Bauer or Bust

  • http://www.christopherhopper.com Chrstopher Hopper

    While watching 24 on Monday night, my friend @gregglovins told me, “The only person that makes you look unproductive in a day is Jack Bauer.” (It spawned this morning's blog post, interestingly enough).

    But to answer your question, my iPhone has become my main means of communication. Simply put, it's so handy. People often tell me, "You're *always* on Twitter and FaceBook! I could never do that." And yet they're surprised to find out I spend no more than 45 minutes on it during the entire course of my day. I'm selective and deliberate with my time, and resist needless ADD surfing.

    I've never tried HootieSuite, so that's next on my agenda. Thanks Michael. ch:
    My recent post Jack Bauer or Bust

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      I predict you will love HootSuite. It allows me to manage Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and even MySpace—all from one dashboard. I can send one post to all of them or select the specific ones.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/PaulSteinbrueck PaulSteinbrueck

    Hey Mike, that's funny. I asked you that question in the Q&A of the Backstage Leadership lunch at Catalyst in October.

    And you must be reading my mind. Last night I started writing a post tentatively titled "10 Ways Blogging Can Help You Achieve Your Dreams." When I got up to #37 I decided to go to bed.

    The point I want to make is that we all are limited to 24 hours in a day. If we say yes to blogging and social media, than we have to say no to some other things. That only makes sense if blogging and social media helps us accomplish our goals better than the things we have to say no to. I'm convinced that when done effectively and efficiently they do.

    My recent post Get a Free Copy of Addition by Adoption by @KevinHendricks

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      I had forgotten that! (I inevitably get the question in every social media seminar I do.)

      I agree with you. Thanks.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/success2you John Richardson

    Great post, Michael. I get up early every morning and check in with my favorite blogs. I try to get a thought or idea working for a blog post. Currently I'm working on a blog series about social media, so I'm looking for new ideas to make my posts more relevant. I usually leave a few comments and then put together a post. Some days creativity comes easily sometimes it doesn't. During the day, I check my phone for e-mail and tweets about every two hours. This way I'm not constantly interrupted. I do the same thing with work e-mail.

    Something I'm considering is an organized weekly setup with Hootsuite. The idea would be to spend about an hour on the weekend, putting together organized tweets in categories and then have them sent out at regular intervals during the week. For example, Monday might be a focus on presentations, with tweets about Powerpoint, speaking, and stage presence. Tuesday might be goal setting etc. The goal would be to put out 6 to 8 organized tweets a day interspersed with a few live tweets. I think that doing this in an organized fashion and letting my readers know about it in advance would give them a reason to tune in and follow along. Since Hootsuite also lets me tie in with Facebook and LinkedIn, using it as a tool to organize all the pieces into a cohesive calendar structure would be very helpful. I'll let you know how it goes.

    BTW… thanks for posts like this… you are a mentor to many people that follow along.
    My recent post Meeting My Mentors

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      Thanks., John. I so enjoyed meeting you face-to-face at Catalyst West. (I also appreciate the shout-out on your blog.)

      I like your idea about thematic tweeting. It's almost like a network channel programming concept. Interesting.

  • http://bigisthenewsmall.com Scott Williams

    Mike, I remember we talked about this over lunch when I was in Nashville.

    I get asked this question a lot as well and my response is simply this: It doesn't take a lot of time and social media should be a natural extension of your everyday life. Work, Family, Thoughts, Play, Interactions…
    My recent post 13 Powerful Tips To Be An Effective Communicator

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      Amen to that!

  • http://therunningcommentary.co.za Mike

    Mike, what a great post!. It certainly covered the topic well. It is a fine balance and you are right about your comment about “just adding one more thing”

    The moment I changed from this to a correct balance in terms of my day I seem to have achieved better productivity.

    My workflow: Early morning 5 minutes catch up on the “stream” – favorite some nice to reads for later. Then hit the office time. I allow myself 5 minutes tweet / RSS bites during the day. (Have an Iphone so this helps) and then an afternoon / late evening mash-up (check all of my interests – this I confess can take sometime if there is a lot of interesting stuff)

    Anyway once again thanks for a great post

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/jskogerboe jskogerboe

    Michael, thank you so much. This is outstanding. You have just condensed and articulated some of the key value points of Social Media… I appreiciate that deeply. In this new 2.0 tech environment, open platform engagement is becoming the expected norm. In ministry, we have both the responsibility and the opportunity to connect with people like never before. I have felt this coming… and I have sensed in my gut the importance of social media in today's ministry environment, but many in leadership at our church are still either a little skeptical or just not that interested. Thank you for helping me clarify my gut feelings into bullet points I can articulate. God bless!

  • http://www.therextras.com BarbaraBoucher PTPhD

    I'm learning a lot about social media from you, Michael. Thank you.

    I think it is important to be selective about who you follow, too. -Ties Number 1 to Number 3. Number 5 seems to be happening for me – younger therapists giving me positive messages about my blog.

    Sociall media is a tool – like a cell phone, pc, car. (Paraphrasing you) Use it wisely.
    My recent post Freedom

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      Yep. I agree. It's just a tool.

  • http://www.yuzzi.com Rick Yuzzi

    In the last year my company has jumped into the social media waters. I now blog and tweet on our behalf. It has definitely forced out other tasks, and made me find ways to be more efficient. I find I have to budget my time more closely, especially with Twitter, since that will eagerly eat as much time as you allow it to. I even started a personal blog this year, although finding time for that is even more of a challenge.
    My recent post God’s Sovereignty and Free Will – Part 2

  • http://www.yuzzi.com Rick Yuzzi

    Michael: I thought this would be of interest. I just happened to run across this story right after reading your post. "Should CEOs Tweet And Blog?"http://www.mediapost.com/publications/?fa=Article
    My recent post God’s Sovereignty and Free Will – Part 2

  • http://www.yuzzi.com Rick Yuzzi

    Michael: I thought this would be of interest. I just happened to run across this story right after reading your post. "Should CEOs Tweet And Blog?"http://www.mediapost.com/publications/?fa=Article
    My recent post God’s Sovereignty and Free Will – Part 2

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      Great. I queued this article up to read when I can grab a few minutes. Thanks.

  • http://intensedebate.com/profiles/mattedmundson Matt Edmundson

    I think this is becoming so important these days that, as a leader, social media should be part of what you do – it is changing how the world communicates. I am spending more and more time on this, each and every day (the iPhone apps are great for helping with all of this). I find the temptation though, is to automate when you become busy – but does this then defeat the whole point or connection? Do we connect (on say, Twitter) or do we play the numbers game?
    My recent post Stagetex – the first 20 months of being in business

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      I think you can automate somethings, but I do this this is something you mostly have to do yourself. I have an article in my archives on Ghost Blogging and Twittering, which addresses a similar issue. People know when you are keeping it real—or not.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/patriciazell patriciazell

    Everything that I am doing for my book/blog is through social media–I look at it as spending time rather than money to get my message out. My biggest challenge–I am the only person I know in my area who uses all the social media. So, I don't have anyone to show me how to better use my smartphone and apps to facilitate my communication. Trial and error eats up a lot of time. Oh well, from my lips to God's ears.
    My recent post #39 THE DOING OF LOVING: FREEDOM

  • http://www.movingperformance.com Ben Hines

    Hi Michael, this is really helpful – thank you. I have recently started my own business, Moving Performance, and I am exploring how Social Media can help us expand our territories in as efficient and effective way possible. We are providing something new in the marketplace. I love what you say about the people following you becoming your tribe – they become your advocates and when they start tweeting & blogging about you then the power of social media really starts to make the difference.

    In our church we have recently set up a business group for entrepreneurs and I am running a session on Social Media in the next few weeks. Would it be OK if I use what you have written as a base for the presentation I am planning for this? Of course you should get more followers after that!!!

    • http://intensedebate.com/profiles/mattedmundson Matt Edmundson

      Hi Ben – would love to hear more about the business group you have set p in your church and how that works (a massive area of interest for me – did something similar at my church in Liverpool, UK).
      My recent post Stagetex – the first 20 months of being in business

      • http://www.movingperformance.com Ben Hines

        Hi Matt, the group meets once a month early morning for coffee and croissants in a cool coffee place. Rather than being a traditional "networking breakfast" type of thing, we use the time to share what God is doing in our businesses, to encourage each other, to pray for each other, to share our visions and to hear from God for each other, and to journey with each other on our business walks. It is about 6 months old now and we are still finding our feet, but I am finding it very encouraging. We are also looking at running occasional "workshops" to discuss particular areas of business such as social media I mentioned above.

        We should link up anyway – I think my bro-in-law is a mate of yours from Liverpool (Mark Jaffrey)?

        • http://intensedebate.com/profiles/mattedmundson Matt Edmundson

          Sounds great Ben – yep, mate of Marks (he's a great guy). What's the best way to link up? We can do that through en-thuse.com site if you like? Or on Twitter at @mattedmundson
          My recent post When to call 999

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      Yes, you are welcome to do so.

      I also recommend Seth Godin's book, Tribes if you haven't read that. Thanks.

  • http://www.inceptresults.com Becky Weiand

    For me finding time can be hard, but I really enjoy Social Media so I make time. I look at the benefits of it, staying up-to-date with clients' needs, it puts our company name out there, and helps us find new clients! With benefits like those, it seems almost crazy that not to find time for it! Using Google Alerts and Hoot Suite has made things so much easier! First thing in the morning, I login, check out those sites, get my updates ready for the day, then through out the day I check them just a few more times and then one more time before bed!

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      That's pretty much my schedule. I will also tweet from meetings.

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  • http://www.susanmeissner.com Susan Meissner

    Thanks for your lab at Catalyst West. I, a quiet novelist who is also on staff at a church, was in the audience. I've been a Twitter holdout the last two years but I think you may have convinced me to set up the account after all. It doesn't have to be all about endless chatter, which is why I've resisted. I would imagine Twitter is what you make of it. Like just about everything else we do on this planet. . . So, thanks. . .

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  • http://www.article-elf.com/ forex robot

    Wow this is a great resource.. I’m enjoying it.. good article

  • http://www.4u2live.com Peter Eleazar

    It seems to me the real time is in the getting going. Once it gains momentum it should settle – partly because it gains its own life and partly because one can then afford to stop trying too hard. I am finding that to be a life lesson – something I taught my sons as they developed in sport. Evey time they tried too hard or played to an audience they went over the ball or hit amiss. I have since added another maxim – enjoy yourself.

    I am still unsure about Twitter – it seems like scattershot – I would love to hear more about thematic tritting, but a lesson I have had to apply is to go to where my audience meets (currently FB, which I also doubt).

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      I think you make a valid point. Things always take longer at the beginning.

      The best way to see if Twitter is right for you is to try it. We can debate it all day, but the cost of just trying it is nominal. Thanks.

  • http://www.shrinkingthecamel.com Bradley J. Moore

    Michael – It's funny, because I actually asked you that very question here on a comment a few months ago. And then I posted last week the same type of post, called "Social Notworking." My forty-something executive peers often view it not just as non-value-added, but as a complete waste of time. Thanks for addressing this, because you are the role model for many of us on this subject, and your points are compelling.

    One thought I have on this is that Blogging and Twitter requires a certain amount of creative writing skills. Unless an executive/CEO has this knack, or an interest in writing, I think he/she will find it difficult to spin off all this content.

    I guess they could always delegate to the communications department…
    My recent post Exercise, Plan, Pray

  • http://www.shrinkingthecamel.com Bradley J. Moore

    Michael – It's funny, because I actually asked you that very question here on a comment a few months ago. And then I posted last week the same type of post, called "Social Notworking." My forty-something executive peers often view it not just as non-value-added, but as a complete waste of time. Thanks for addressing this, because you are the role model for many of us on this subject, and your points are compelling.

    One thought I have on this is that Blogging and Twitter requires a certain amount of creative writing skills. Unless an executive/CEO has this knack, or an interest in writing, I think he/she will find it difficult to spin off all this content.

    I guess they could always delegate to the communications department…
    My recent post Exercise, Plan, Pray

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      For blogging, I think that is true. That’s why I now suggest that they consider a video blog or podcast. It doesn’t matter—whatever medium they are most comfortable with will work.

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  • Tiffany Cox

    Mr. Hyatt, you are so good at what you do. Thank you for sharing all you know and are learning to us, the average Joes of this world. Well, at least I'm an average Joe. You have greatly affected my life through this simple yet compelling blog. Thank you.
    My recent post Brielle's First Feeding

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  • http://r2ntlimewirefreedlz.wetpaint.com/ limewire

    shoot amazing stuff man.

  • http://www.mickmel.com/ Mickey

    I'd add two more things: Save Time and Buy Time

    Save Time: Keep your inbox cleaned out, use a proper to-do list, be productive from any computer (DropBox, Evernote, web-based mail). Time saved = more time for social media.

    Buy Time: If you have the funds, buy a faster computer (those seconds add up), hire a housekeeper, hire lawn care, etc. That extra time can go to social media, your job, your family — whatever you want.

  • http://www.pharmacytechnicianblog.com/ pharmacy technician

    My cousin recommended this blog and she was totally right keep up the fantastic work!

  • http://www.designedbyeh.com Eric Hall

    Michael – these are indeed good thoughts. I caught this link from my friend who is a Senior Pastor of a large church of about 1,500 people. He's asking me the exact question. He asked me to read the article and come to our next semi regular meeting prepared to talk together.

    I'm a solo entrepreneur doing web development for a living. So it comes sort of natural to spend time on social media.

    But, I also see it as a huge potential distraction as well.

    The key to using social media is learning to celebrate three key areas (at least for me):

    1. Personal life – where I do care about the great coffee you just had or that you just gave birth to the baby, etc.

    2. Business life – where I don't care about the above, but do care about my brand, latest developments, etc.

    3. Wasteful stuff – this is where I can waste time – reading posts that don't matter in either world, playing the friends number game, etc.

    Learning to avoid item 3 can often be very difficult to many people (including me).

    Thanks again!

  • http://j.mp/9bbM79 Santosh Shukla

    Thanks Mike.

    I am not a CEO but I aspire to be one. I value time and think that even though Social Media is essential we should be consciously spending our time on it.
    Social media if not used consciously and effectively can leave you with couple of hours short without any ROI.
    I have been thinking about it and have come up with some tips to get the best out of social media without wasting too much time.
    Please read and comment. http://blog.insideview.com/2010/05/02/investing-t

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  • http://intensedebate.com/profiles/gauravjha83 gauravjha83

    Mike, excellent five points. Our CEO Umberto Milleti (InsideView) makes it a point that he's equally involved in the company's SM efforts as any one else in the company. Companies across the globe are beginning to realize the potential of this untapped medium. Companies like Starbucks and Coca Cola have appointed new Chief Blogging Officers, or Chief Social Media Officers. All this goes to show that the involvement of the leadership in tapping in to this new communication channel is taking prevelance over all others.

    I can't add to your brilliantly compiled list, but only thank you for sharing your thoughts.

    On a somewhat related note, I mentioned some of my own personal ideas on how B2B salespeople are leveraging Social Media to connect better with their prospects:http://bit.ly/cLwKjZ

    I also wrote a post on how Social CRM is becoming the new buzzword around town:http://bit.ly/c8lvma

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  • Robert Varnam

    Really helpful thoughts, Michael. Another key benefit is that SM provides communicators the discipline of saying the same thing different ways – thus improving their message

  • http://twitter.com/Buehlerish Trevor Buehler

    Hey Michael. I know you use Hootsuite for most of your Twitter and Facebook posting. Have you ever tried Social Sprout or CoTweet? I have been called on to help the non-profit I work for to setup a proper social media presence, and I am stuck wondering what platform to suggest to allow me to have multiple members to have access to the accounts for posting and moderating. I haven’t seen you post anything comparing these kinds of services. Have you ever tried any other than Hootsuite? Thanks for all of your work in this area.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      I posted a comparison about 18 months ago. It is pretty outdated now. I probably need to update it. I have not tried CoTweet or Social Sprout. Frankly, HootSuite is great for my needs.

      • http://twitter.com/Buehlerish Trevor Buehler

        Great! I’m sorry. Do you have a link? Perhaps I’m blind as I’m not seeing it anywhere on the blog. Was it recently? Thanks for all you’re doing Michael. God bless.