My Current Presentation Tools

I usually make three to four major presentations a month. In January, for example, I made presentations at our Quarterly Business Review Meeting, our All Employee Meeting, and The Thomas Nelson Way session. In February, I will make four presentations.

My Keynote Presentation of “Social Media 101”

I often get asked what tools I use to create my presentations. Currently, I am using eight:

  1. OmniOutliner. This is where it all begins. I start with the content. Personally, I think the worst thing you can do is start with your presentation software. This is letting the tail wag the dog. You need to start with great content and then decide how to best illustrate it or enhance it. In this regard, I highly recommend two books: Beyond Bullet Points by Cliff Atkinson and Made to Stick by Chip and Dan Heath.
  2. Keynote. It’s not that I dislike Microsoft PowerPoint. My feelings are much stronger than that: I actually hate it. I started using Apple Keynote a few years ago and have never looked back. Occasionally, I am forced to use PowerPoint (yes, I have version 2008), but it’s never a pleasant experience. I find Keynote gives presentations a professional, finished look with the minimum amount of effort. The results are always great. I just used the most recent version, Keynote 09, in my last presentation. It worked flawlessly and is well-worth the upgrade.
  3. iStockPhoto. I have a theory about presentations: the presenter should be the show not the slides. In other words, the message I am delivering is the main thing. The slides are simply there to illustrate or enhance that message, not be the message. As a result, I use very, very few bullet slides. (This methodology is best laid out in three must-read books: Beyond Bullet Points by Cliff Atkinson, already referenced above, Presentation Zen by Garr Reynolds, and Slide:ology by Nancy Duarte.) Instead, I usually use charts, graphs, a single word, or a photo. I get nearly all of my photos from iStockPhoto. They are amazingly inexpensive and the library of images is ginormous—and growing. I also use them for all my blog photos.
  4. Handbrake. I also embed quite a bit of video in my presentations. If a picture is worth a thousand words, a video clip is worth ten thousand. I used to use a hardware switcher that switched between my presentation software and a DVD player. Not any more. I simply “rip” the video clip and embed it right in Keynote. It creates a seamless transition. I use Handbrake, a free software program, that will rip a DVD chapter and convert it to an MPEG-4 video.
  5. QuickTime Pro. Once I have ripped the chapter I want, I often need to edit just a clip from the chapter. There are lots of ways to do this including iMovie and Final Cut Studio or Express. But in my view, these are overkill. I can do the same thing in QuickTime Pro. I simply select the clip I want, “trim” off the beginning and end of the clip, and save it to my hard disk.
  6. Box Shot 3D. This program does one thing extremely well. It creates 3D covers of books that look very realistic, including reflections and shadows. You can control almost every aspect of the lighting. Since I work for a publishing company, most of my presentations have slides of book covers. I use this program to show them in 3D.
  7. Snapz Pro X. Occasionally, I need to include a screenshot in a presentation. Macs come with this capability built-in, but I wanted more control. There are several programs that provide enhanced screenshot capabilities, including Skitch and LittleSnapper. I have tried them all and keep coming back to Snapz Pro X. The interface needs an update, but I still find that it gives me the most control. (I used this program to take the screenshot I used in the blog photo above.)
  8. KeySpan Remote. There are several programs that will turn your iPhone into a Keynote remote controller, including Apple’s own Keynote Remote. However, an iPhone is just too big for me. I want to use a remote that is inconspicuous and fits in the palm of my hand. Enter KeySpan Remote. I have had this remote for a couple of years and have not found anything else that is smaller or easier to use.

I intentionally didn’t talk about projectors. I don’t even think about this any more. I use whatever the venue has, and they are usually sufficient. (I can’t even remember the last time this was a problem.) I set my Mac to dual display mode, so that I can see Presenter Notes on my laptop and display the slides to the audience.

Finally, if you are really serious about making great presentations, get a Mac. I switched four years ago and have never looked back. In my humble opinion, the presentation options are just much better. I personally prefer the 15″ MacBook Pro.

Question: What am I missing? If you are a speaker, what tools do you use? You can leave a comment by clicking here.

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  • http://coffeeandcelluloid.com Joey

    Way cool list. I’ve never heard of Box Shot 3D, but I gave it a try and it’s pretty awesome.

  • http://building-his-body.blogspot.com/ Anne Lang Bundy

    Mike, you mention only video tools (and this is an impressive summary). Perhaps it’s politically incorrect to mention killing trees, but I’m curious about how you use handouts—or do you utterly shun them?

  • http://www.livingvapor.com/blog Mike C

    What a great list. I have been a trainer for 2 different wireless companies over the last 5 years and I can’t tell you how many times I wish I could have used a mac. A lot of training programs are stuck in the windows world and it shows…with the massive amount of bullet points up on the screen. No Passion, No Profit is what I always say. Even when it comes to teaching people about feature trees and how a cell phone network works.

  • http://michelemiller.blogs.com Michele Miller

    Great post, Michael! You made me laugh out loud with your “feelings” about PowerPoint. I use all the tools you mentioned, but hadn’t heard of Box 3D – will definitely check it out. I used the Keyspan remote for years and loved it – now love the Logitech even more – has a built in timer, etc. But I still keep the Keyspan as a trusty backup.

    You might want to check out TubeSock, if you’re into using videos. Great piece of software ($15) that allows you to download videos off of YouTube.

    Thanks for sharing!

    • Jason

      For downloading YouTube videos, I'd recommend the website keepvid.com. The service is free and will allow you to download videos in both .flv and .mp4 formats.

  • http://coffeeandcelluloid.com/ Joey

    Way cool list. I've never heard of Box Shot 3D, but I gave it a try and it's pretty awesome.

  • Bruce W

    A useful list and informative post. How about a ‘how to’ video . Show me, how you build,craft, one of those February presentations!

  • http://flowerdust.net/ Anne Jackson

    I use the Apple Remote (the tiny white one) with Keynote. It is SO tiny and doesn’t require a USB – you can even pair it with your mac so you don’t accidentally start controlling someone else’s computer or vice versa.

    • http://twitter.com/lesposen lesposen

      These Apple remotes wont’t work on the latest Macbooks which no longer come with IR built in. :-(

  • http://flowerdust.net Anne Jackson

    I use the Apple Remote (the tiny white one) with Keynote. It is SO tiny and doesn’t require a USB – you can even pair it with your mac so you don’t accidentally start controlling someone else’s computer or vice versa.

  • http://building-his-body.blogspot.com/ Anne Lang Bundy

    Mike, you mention only video tools (and this is an impressive summary). Perhaps it's politically incorrect to mention killing trees, but I'm curious about how you use handouts—or do you utterly shun them?

  • http://www.speakingaboutpresenting.com Olivia Mitchell

    Hi Michael
    istockphoto is great for quickly finding good quality photos. But the photos of people in istockphoto are starting to look a little cliched (they’re not real people with real emotions). But now there are search engines that make searching flickr quicker and with more accurate results. Try http://www.compfight.com. You’ll get more quirky interesting photos.

  • http://profile.typepad.com/andyrowell94 Andy Rowell

    Phenomenal. Thanks. This is gold.

  • http://www.livingvapor.com/blog Mike C

    What a great list. I have been a trainer for 2 different wireless companies over the last 5 years and I can't tell you how many times I wish I could have used a mac. A lot of training programs are stuck in the windows world and it shows…with the massive amount of bullet points up on the screen. No Passion, No Profit is what I always say. Even when it comes to teaching people about feature trees and how a cell phone network works.

  • http://michelemiller.blogs.com/ Michele Miller

    Great post, Michael! You made me laugh out loud with your "feelings" about PowerPoint. I use all the tools you mentioned, but hadn't heard of Box 3D – will definitely check it out. I used the Keyspan remote for years and loved it – now love the Logitech even more – has a built in timer, etc. But I still keep the Keyspan as a trusty backup.

    You might want to check out TubeSock, if you're into using videos. Great piece of software ($15) that allows you to download videos off of YouTube.

    Thanks for sharing!

    • Jason

      For downloading YouTube videos, I'd recommend the website keepvid.com. The service is free and will allow you to download videos in both .flv and .mp4 formats.

  • Bruce W

    A useful list and informative post. How about a 'how to' video . Show me, how you build,craft, one of those February presentations!

  • http://profile.typepad.com/mhyatt Michael Hyatt

    @All, I just fixed the link to Box Shot 3D.

    @Anne, I don’t usually use handouts. I don’t like people reading ahead. I want them to be “in the moment.” If I use them at all, it is usually as a “leave behind.”

    Also, the way I do my presentations, my slides don’t make a lot of sense without my oral presentation.

    @Michele, I probably should have mentioned TubeSock. I use it whenever I need a YouTube video. However, I use those infrequently, because I am suck a stickler for high-resolution video. Usually, if I find a video on YouTube that I like, I try to contact the creator and get a higher-resolution version.

    Thanks to everyone else for your tips!

  • http://www.speakingaboutpresenting.com/ Olivia Mitchell

    Hi Michael
    istockphoto is great for quickly finding good quality photos. But the photos of people in istockphoto are starting to look a little cliched (they're not real people with real emotions). But now there are search engines that make searching flickr quicker and with more accurate results. Try http://www.compfight.com. You'll get more quirky interesting photos.

  • http://profile.typepad.com/andyrowell94 Andy Rowell

    Phenomenal. Thanks. This is gold.

  • http://profile.typepad.com/mhyatt Michael Hyatt

    @All, I just fixed the link to Box Shot 3D.

    @Anne, I don’t usually use handouts. I don’t like people reading ahead. I want them to be “in the moment.” If I use them at all, it is usually as a “leave behind.”

    Also, the way I do my presentations, my slides don’t make a lot of sense without my oral presentation.

    @Michele, I probably should have mentioned TubeSock. I use it whenever I need a YouTube video. However, I use those infrequently, because I am suck a stickler for high-resolution video. Usually, if I find a video on YouTube that I like, I try to contact the creator and get a higher-resolution version.

    Thanks to everyone else for your tips!

  • http://kevinrossen.com Kevin Rossen

    Great post, Michael! I know most of it applies more toward business presentations, but I’m a minister and I feel like it’s applicable to teaching/preaching situations as well. For my context, I always use Logos Bible Software (AKA Libronix) Gold Edition to do my Bible study and to copy and past Scriptures into my slides/handouts. It’s a lifesaver!

    Side note, it kind of ironic that Microsoft Press released Beyond Bullet Points even though their product, PowerPoint, is generally hated by most presenters. The company needs to step it up soon.

  • http://kevinrossen.com/ Kevin Rossen

    Great post, Michael! I know most of it applies more toward business presentations, but I'm a minister and I feel like it's applicable to teaching/preaching situations as well. For my context, I always use Logos Bible Software (AKA Libronix) Gold Edition to do my Bible study and to copy and past Scriptures into my slides/handouts. It's a lifesaver!

    Side note, it kind of ironic that Microsoft Press released Beyond Bullet Points even though their product, PowerPoint, is generally hated by most presenters. The company needs to step it up soon.

  • http://www.aaronasay.com Aaron Asay

    Michael,

    Great post! Thanks again for sharing some real life insight from such an accomplished Man!

    Gald to hear your combination of Handbrake and QT Pro… For years my video friends have thought I was crazy for all the things I used QT for… But it just makes sense! I use it most for 2 things, recording live audio, and recording live video… Instead of shooting a short segment on a video camera, Importing it, then editing, I just use QT to do the whole thing… Has saved me days out of my life!

  • http://AndyAndrews.com Andy Andrews

    Great post, Mike.

    You are in the top 3 speakers I have ever seen in the CEO/President/Corporate Honcho realm. You and the CEO of Bayer Pharmaceuticals are Neck N Neck! Believe me, I have seen a lot of them because they always seem to speak right after me or before me.

    Your comment about “the speaker should be the show…not the slides” is right on target. I am amazed at how many speakers allow the audience to ignore them because there is so much going on with the screen.

    Thanks for continuing to teach. I learn a lot from your posts and this one was no exception!

    Andy

  • http://www.aaronasay.com/ Aaron Asay

    Michael,

    Great post! Thanks again for sharing some real life insight from such an accomplished Man!

    Gald to hear your combination of Handbrake and QT Pro… For years my video friends have thought I was crazy for all the things I used QT for… But it just makes sense! I use it most for 2 things, recording live audio, and recording live video… Instead of shooting a short segment on a video camera, Importing it, then editing, I just use QT to do the whole thing… Has saved me days out of my life!

  • http://jjustj.livejournal.com Jeffrey Holton

    Excellent list! Some I knew and some I didn’t.

    I’m a Mac convert from about seven years ago, and I use these presentation recommendations even as I perform Instructor-Led Training design work. It’s a strange place to apply minimalism, but it’s so necessary.

    For those stuck in a PC-centric environment, you might want to take a look at SnagIt for screen captures. It’s very feature-rich. But don’t let it keep you addicted to the PCs.

  • http://AndyAndrews.com/ Andy Andrews

    Great post, Mike.

    You are in the top 3 speakers I have ever seen in the CEO/President/Corporate Honcho realm. You and the CEO of Bayer Pharmaceuticals are Neck N Neck! Believe me, I have seen a lot of them because they always seem to speak right after me or before me.

    Your comment about "the speaker should be the show…not the slides" is right on target. I am amazed at how many speakers allow the audience to ignore them because there is so much going on with the screen.

    Thanks for continuing to teach. I learn a lot from your posts and this one was no exception!

    Andy

  • http://www.courageoussingleparenting.blogspot.com Scoti Springfield Domeij

    Right now I’m stuck with PowerPoint and drooling over the equipment and software you recommended.

    I dread it when speakers for my writers’ group say, “I have a PowerPoint,” because Murphy’s Law always seems to win: If anything can go wrong, it will.

    So, I researched tips from some of the recommendations you mentioned and wrote a blog “Creating a PowerPoint: The ABC’s” [http://thewritingroad.blogspot.com/2008/03/creating-powerpoint-abcs.html] to help speakers who lead workshops.

    My last two tips are:

    Yadda-Yadda: PowerPoint is not a teleprompter. Don’t read the PowerPoint slide word for word. Spend 45 seconds to 5 minutes per slide to reinforce your points. Plan your talk to correspond with—not repeat—the information on the slides.

    Zombie Proofing: The mind only tolerates what the derrière can bear.

  • http://jjustj.livejournal.com/ Jeffrey Holton

    Excellent list! Some I knew and some I didn't.

    I'm a Mac convert from about seven years ago, and I use these presentation recommendations even as I perform Instructor-Led Training design work. It's a strange place to apply minimalism, but it's so necessary.

    For those stuck in a PC-centric environment, you might want to take a look at SnagIt for screen captures. It's very feature-rich. But don't let it keep you addicted to the PCs.

  • http://www.courageoussingleparenting.blogspot.com/ Scoti Springfield Do

    Right now I'm stuck with PowerPoint and drooling over the equipment and software you recommended.

    I dread it when speakers for my writers' group say, "I have a PowerPoint," because Murphy's Law always seems to win: If anything can go wrong, it will.

    So, I researched tips from some of the recommendations you mentioned and wrote a blog "Creating a PowerPoint: The ABC's" [http://thewritingroad.blogspot.com/2008/03/creating-powerpoint-abcs.html] to help speakers who lead workshops.

    My last two tips are:

    Yadda-Yadda: PowerPoint is not a teleprompter. Don’t read the PowerPoint slide word for word. Spend 45 seconds to 5 minutes per slide to reinforce your points. Plan your talk to correspond with—not repeat—the information on the slides.

    Zombie Proofing: The mind only tolerates what the derrière can bear.

  • http://www.twistimage.com/blog Mitch Joel – Twist Image

    Great post.

    I also do a ton of presenting (and I am on PC). I have found a couple of tools indispensable.

    1. Logitech Presenter – it is, without question, the best presenter I have used (and I have used them all). It has an amazing range and a great feel, but there’s nothing better than the digital timer it has which also gives you a silent vibrate when you have 5 minutes left and one when your pre-defined time is up. Clients love it when you stick to their schedule.

    2. Reshade – a cool little photo application that magically makes low-res photos look amazingly crisp on slides.

    3. Count Down Timer – when I do seminars, this handy on-screen timer lets people in the audience know how long the break will be and when we are starting back.

    4. M-Audio Microtrack – I use this to audio record my presentations. Listening back to them is one of the best ways to identify areas that need improvement, and it also enables me to capture moments that are more “off the cuff.”

    Once we’re discussing presentations, I’d also recommend picking up two books: Garr Reynolds’ Presentation Zen and Nick Morgan’s Give Your Speech, Change The World.

    Enjoy!

  • http://www.twistimage.com/blog Mitch Joel – Twist I

    Great post.

    I also do a ton of presenting (and I am on PC). I have found a couple of tools indispensable.

    1. Logitech Presenter – it is, without question, the best presenter I have used (and I have used them all). It has an amazing range and a great feel, but there's nothing better than the digital timer it has which also gives you a silent vibrate when you have 5 minutes left and one when your pre-defined time is up. Clients love it when you stick to their schedule.

    2. Reshade – a cool little photo application that magically makes low-res photos look amazingly crisp on slides.

    3. Count Down Timer – when I do seminars, this handy on-screen timer lets people in the audience know how long the break will be and when we are starting back.

    4. M-Audio Microtrack – I use this to audio record my presentations. Listening back to them is one of the best ways to identify areas that need improvement, and it also enables me to capture moments that are more "off the cuff."

    Once we're discussing presentations, I'd also recommend picking up two books: Garr Reynolds' Presentation Zen and Nick Morgan's Give Your Speech, Change The World.

    Enjoy!

  • http://thinkinginprogress.com Jason Salamun

    Great list Michael.

    I’m one of those in favor of going analog before I go digital. Using paper and pen before I go to software really helps with processing and flow (for me).

    You can also use Safari to download YouTube videos for your presentations. Tools > Activity > find large file size > save it

    PowerPoint 08 is a big improvement from past years but I agree with the ease of use of Keynote.

    • Andy

      Does using safari to download YouTube videos still work? I couldn't find the menu you mentioned, but TubeSock doesn't work anymore, mostly because YouTube has started protecting things. Any updates would be aprreciated

      • Jason

        For downloading YouTube videos, I'd recommend the website keepvid.com. The service is free and will allow you to download videos in both .flv and .mp4 formats.

  • http://thinkinginprogress.com/ Jason Salamun

    Great list Michael.

    I'm one of those in favor of going analog before I go digital. Using paper and pen before I go to software really helps with processing and flow (for me).

    You can also use Safari to download YouTube videos for your presentations. Tools > Activity > find large file size > save it

    PowerPoint 08 is a big improvement from past years but I agree with the ease of use of Keynote.

    • Andy

      Does using safari to download YouTube videos still work? I couldn't find the menu you mentioned, but TubeSock doesn't work anymore, mostly because YouTube has started protecting things. Any updates would be aprreciated

      • Jason

        For downloading YouTube videos, I'd recommend the website keepvid.com. The service is free and will allow you to download videos in both .flv and .mp4 formats.

  • http://www.nozbe.com Michael

    Great post Michael,

    Keynote was one of the reasons I switched to a Mac.

    It’s not only that Keynote is easier to use, it’s the fact that the presentations done in Keynote look stunning out of the box. You don’t have to be a designer to create beautiful presentations in Keynote.

    Powerpoint is a different story with the default settings set to create slides with small-font bullet points and white background.

    About the remote – Mike – what’s wrong with the Apple remote? I find your remote with USB stick a little overhaul compared to the slick Apple remote that works with every Mac?

    I’m still not convinced to upgrade to iWork ’09 – is it really worth it?

    BTW, I’m using Macbook Air 1st gen SSD. It is underpowered but it’s light, portable and beautiful… and it works well enough for my needs.

  • http://www.asgoodadayasany.wordpress.com Marilyn

    GREAT post!

    I am delighted to see OmniOutliner at the top. I’m a huge fan. It helps keep me on top of all my projects and it’s the ‘loading dock’ for my content. If my presentation lacks substance there, there’s no point moving on to all the bells-and-whistles.

  • http://www.john-gallagher.blogspot.com John Gallagher

    Mike, Great post and thanks for sharing all of this valuable information.

  • http://www.nozbe.com/ Michael

    Great post Michael,

    Keynote was one of the reasons I switched to a Mac.

    It's not only that Keynote is easier to use, it's the fact that the presentations done in Keynote look stunning out of the box. You don't have to be a designer to create beautiful presentations in Keynote.

    Powerpoint is a different story with the default settings set to create slides with small-font bullet points and white background.

    About the remote – Mike – what's wrong with the Apple remote? I find your remote with USB stick a little overhaul compared to the slick Apple remote that works with every Mac?

    I'm still not convinced to upgrade to iWork '09 – is it really worth it?

    BTW, I'm using Macbook Air 1st gen SSD. It is underpowered but it's light, portable and beautiful… and it works well enough for my needs.

  • http://www.asgoodadayasany.wordpress.com/ Marilyn

    GREAT post!

    I am delighted to see OmniOutliner at the top. I'm a huge fan. It helps keep me on top of all my projects and it's the 'loading dock' for my content. If my presentation lacks substance there, there's no point moving on to all the bells-and-whistles.

  • http://www.john-gallagher.blogspot.com/ John Gallagher

    Mike, Great post and thanks for sharing all of this valuable information.

  • http://www.breakingmurphyslaw.com/ Lee Potts

    Great post. I especially want to second your book recommendations.

    One minor item: Please be sure to knock on wood when you tempt fate like this:

    “I intentionally didn’t talk about projectors. I don’t even think about this any more. I use whatever the venue has, and they are usually sufficient. (I can’t even remember the last time this was a problem.)”

  • http://www.breakingmurphyslaw.com/ Lee Potts

    Great post. I especially want to second your book recommendations.

    One minor item: Please be sure to knock on wood when you tempt fate like this:

    "I intentionally didn’t talk about projectors. I don’t even think about this any more. I use whatever the venue has, and they are usually sufficient. (I can't even remember the last time this was a problem.)"

  • http://www.fokkekooistra.nl/blog/ Fokke Kooistra

    Excellent post!

    One addition from my perspective:in stead of using OmniOutliner (I have almost all Omnigroup apps) I like to use Mindmanager for this first step in making a presentation.

    Kind regards,

    Fokke

  • http://www.fokkekooistra.nl/blog/ Fokke Kooistra

    Excellent post!

    One addition from my perspective:in stead of using OmniOutliner (I have almost all Omnigroup apps) I like to use Mindmanager for this first step in making a presentation.

    Kind regards,

    Fokke

  • http://www.bestpublicspeakingtraining.com/ Public Speaking Training Expert, David Portney

    This is a delightful, informative, and quite useful posting, thanks! I appreciate the tech tips as I do love tech where it will enhance my presentations.

    In my many years of doing corporate trainings, I’ve experimented with zero technology used, and trainings that were practically all tech, and blends in-between. My personal experience is that what works best for the group (emphasis: the group, not me) is a blend of me talking, putting their nose into printed matter, and videos for them to watch.

    This seems to break up the training routine for them and provide an assortment of experience and since some people receive info better by watching listening or doing, the combination of reading, lecture and video covers all those bases quite well.

    Best,
    David Portney

  • http://www.bestpublicspeakingtraining.com/ Public Speaking Trai

    This is a delightful, informative, and quite useful posting, thanks! I appreciate the tech tips as I do love tech where it will enhance my presentations.

    In my many years of doing corporate trainings, I've experimented with zero technology used, and trainings that were practically all tech, and blends in-between. My personal experience is that what works best for the group (emphasis: the group, not me) is a blend of me talking, putting their nose into printed matter, and videos for them to watch.

    This seems to break up the training routine for them and provide an assortment of experience and since some people receive info better by watching listening or doing, the combination of reading, lecture and video covers all those bases quite well.

    Best,
    David Portney

  • http://www.sliderocket.com/blog Tracy Frey

    Hi Michael,

    Sorry for the late comment – I just stumbled across your great post. Have you tried SlideRocket (http://www.sliderocket.com) yet? We are often called "Keynote for PC," as we provide a Keynote-like experience, but with 0 compatibility issues, as we are a web app. We also have a built in marketplace for searching for and purchasing stock photos, graphics, cartoons, etc., and a full integration with Flickr. SlideRocket also supports full HD video, and the playback is awesome – even in a web meeting. We'd certainly love for you to give it a try and let us know what you think!

    Your post has given us some great ideas for future marketplace partners…

    Please let me know if you have any questions, and I hope to see you in SlideRocket soon!
    Take care,
    Tracy

    Senior Director of Community and Product Marketing
    http://www.sliderocket.com

  • http://www.sliderocket.com/blog Tracy Frey

    Hi Michael,

    Sorry for the late comment – I just stumbled across your great post. Have you tried SlideRocket ( <a href="http://www.sliderocket.com)” target=”_blank”>www.sliderocket.com) yet? We are often called "Keynote for PC," as we provide a Keynote-like experience, but with 0 compatibility issues, as we are a web app. We also have a built in marketplace for searching for and purchasing stock photos, graphics, cartoons, etc., and a full integration with Flickr. SlideRocket also supports full HD video, and the playback is awesome – even in a web meeting. We'd certainly love for you to give it a try and let us know what you think!

    Your post has given us some great ideas for future marketplace partners…

    Please let me know if you have any questions, and I hope to see you in SlideRocket soon!
    Take care,
    Tracy

    Senior Director of Community and Product Marketing
    <a href="http://www.sliderocket.com” target=”_blank”>www.sliderocket.com

  • Brent Fraizer

    Great post Michael and great site! I tried out handbrake and it works very well.

    Question. Do you have any copyright issues with using movie clips from commercial dvd's? I have a couple of clips we would like to use but not sure if this is something I need to be concerned with.

    Thanks,
    Brent

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      It depends. If it is just a clip. It falls under "fair use."

  • Brent Fraizer

    Great post Michael and great site! I tried out handbrake and it works very well.

    Question. Do you have any copyright issues with using movie clips from commercial dvd's? I have a couple of clips we would like to use but not sure if this is something I need to be concerned with.

    Thanks,
    Brent

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      It depends. If it is just a clip. It falls under "fair use."

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  • http://www.melissasalomon.com/ Melissa

    Have you ever tried <a href="http://www.prezi.com” target=”_blank”>www.prezi.com
    We put together our first presentation for a latin american directors meeting in panama of Lutheran Hour Ministries……thanks for sharing what you use…..just started working on a macbook.

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      Yes, I have tried Prezi. I was impressed. However, I didn't see using that for everyday use. Thanks.

      • http://twitter.com/pauldz @pauldz

        I can see that if you have to present three or four times a week that Prezi would be too much work. It demands that you have a little 'graphic designer' in you. I've used it on several occasions and enjoyed it too.

      • http://derekbruff.com Derek Bruff

        Prezi is my go-to tool, in part because I can use it for brainstorming a presentation so easily. I’d rather use a mind map for brainstorming than an outline, most days.

        The other great thing about Prezi is that you can zoom out and show your audience the big picture. This works best if (a) you’ve used images along the way that still work at “thumbnail” size and (b) you’ve laid out your content in some kind of sensible way. Helping people see how details and examples fit together is challenging, and Prezi helps with that.

        It takes more time to use than PowerPoint or Keynote–not because of the technology, but because of the extra conceptual work it requires to use well. It sounds like you’re doing most of that conceptual work through outlines and image selection anyway!

        • http://michaelhyatt.com/ Michael Hyatt

          Thanks. I’ll have to give it a try one of these days.

  • http://www.melissasalomon.com Melissa

    Have you ever tried http://www.prezi.com
    We put together our first presentation for a latin american directors meeting in panama of Lutheran Hour Ministries……thanks for sharing what you use…..just started working on a macbook.

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      Yes, I have tried Prezi. I was impressed. However, I didn't see using that for everyday use. Thanks.

      • http://twitter.com/pauldz @pauldz

        I can see that if you have to present three or four times a week that Prezi would be too much work. It demands that you have a little 'graphic designer' in you. I've used it on several occasions and enjoyed it too.

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  • http://www.billwhitt.com/blog Bill Whitt

    I think of most importance (other than content, which is always king) is a good sense of aesthetics and design. Whatever presentation program I use, I rely heavily on Photoshop to actually design the slides. I love modern, clean, minimalist designs, and that's what I try to create.

    I'm a fellow MacBook Pro 15" user, but I also have Windows machines. And like I said before, I believe it's less about the tool and more about how you use it.

  • http://www.billwhitt.com/blog Bill Whitt

    I think of most importance (other than content, which is always king) is a good sense of aesthetics and design. Whatever presentation program I use, I rely heavily on Photoshop to actually design the slides. I love modern, clean, minimalist designs, and that's what I try to create.

    I'm a fellow MacBook Pro 15" user, but I also have Windows machines. And like I said before, I believe it's less about the tool and more about how you use it.

  • http://www.studentministry101.com/ David Mehrle

    Michael,

    I love what you wrote and you are right on target. Ihave found evernote incredibly useful when gathering information for a presentation and collecting notes so that I can start an outline or to fill in my outline.

    Would be interested in your preferences on writing software?

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      It depends on what I am writing. For all purpose writing, I use iWork Pages. For outlining, I used OmniOutliner. For blogging, I use ecto. For writing books, I use Scrivener.

  • http://www.studentministry101.com David Mehrle

    Michael,

    I love what you wrote and you are right on target. Ihave found evernote incredibly useful when gathering information for a presentation and collecting notes so that I can start an outline or to fill in my outline.

    Would be interested in your preferences on writing software?

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      It depends on what I am writing. For all purpose writing, I use iWork Pages. For outlining, I used OmniOutliner. For blogging, I use ecto. For writing books, I use Scrivener.

  • Ross Strader

    Michael,
    Thank you for sharing your workflow and tools. It is very helpful.
    I was wondering if you have created any useful templates in OmniOutliner that you wouldn't mind sharing?

  • Ross Strader

    Michael,
    Thank you for sharing your workflow and tools. It is very helpful.
    I was wondering if you have created any useful templates in OmniOutliner that you wouldn't mind sharing?

  • http://twitter.com/Partyaficionado @Partyaficionado

    Nice Post! Can't wait to start using some of these presentation tools.

  • http://twitter.com/Partyaficionado @Partyaficionado

    Nice Post! Can't wait to start using some of these presentation tools.

  • http://www.coolsprings.com Cool Springs

    Michael do you use any screen video capture siftware? Im struggling to find one.

    Thanks,

    Todd

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      I use Snapz Pro for Mac. Jing is another one I have used for quick screen capture and annotation. SnagIt for PC and now for Mac (Beta) is awesome. However, I am not sure the Mac version yet has video. Thanks.

      • http://www.granthammond.com/about/ Grant Hammond

        Any experience with Camtasia?
        My recent post Rare Foreclosure in Belle Meade

        • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

          Not really. I used to use a product they produced for the PC years ago and loved it. However, I haven’t tried this.

  • http://www.coolsprings.com/ Cool Springs

    Michael do you use any screen video capture siftware? Im struggling to find one.

    Thanks,

    Todd

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      I use Snapz Pro for Mac. Jing is another one I have used for quick screen capture and annotation. SnagIt for PC and now for Mac (Beta) is awesome. However, I am not sure the Mac version yet has video. Thanks.

      • http://www.granthammond.com/about/ Grant Hammond

        Any experience with Camtasia?
        My recent post Rare Foreclosure in Belle Meade

        • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

          Not really. I used to use a product they produced for the PC years ago and loved it. However, I haven’t tried this.

  • http://successbeginstoday.org/wordpress/category/powerpoint/ John Richardson

    Michael, great recommendations. I agree that the presenter should take center stage and should keep their attention focused on the audience. This is relatively easy if you have your laptop in presenter mode and have it in a location that you can see it while focusing on the audience. Unfortunately this is often not the case.
    I always print out a sheet of screen shots (usually 9 per page) and put it on the table or lectern before me. This way I know what is coming and I can stay focused on the audience. This technique requires a good remote control that you can trust, but I have had good luck with the radio frequency units.
    As you mentioned, the whole secret to this style of presentation is to use pictures or graphs and very limited text, but it is so effective. Compare this to the usual bullet points with the presenter reading them and it's not even a contest.
    My greatest speech secret is to practice my presentation at a Toastmasters meeting before giving it to the intended audience and get written feedback from everyone. This has been so helpful and has saved me from unintended embarrassment many times.
    While I really like Keynote and using a MacBook, it's nice to have a backup copy in an older version of Powerpoint saved on a memory stick just in case you have to use the site computer. My greatest fear (and it has happened numerous times) is that my laptop will not sync with the location's projector and I have to use their computer with an old version of MS Powerpoint. Old Powerpoint is not great but it beats nothing at all…
    My recent post Do You Have a Heartfelt Goal?

  • http://successbeginstoday.org/wordpress/category/powerpoint/ John Richardson

    Michael, great recommendations. I agree that the presenter should take center stage and should keep their attention focused on the audience. This is relatively easy if you have your laptop in presenter mode and have it in a location that you can see it while focusing on the audience. Unfortunately this is often not the case.
    I always print out a sheet of screen shots (usually 9 per page) and put it on the table or lectern before me. This way I know what is coming and I can stay focused on the audience. This technique requires a good remote control that you can trust, but I have had good luck with the radio frequency units.
    As you mentioned, the whole secret to this style of presentation is to use pictures or graphs and very limited text, but it is so effective. Compare this to the usual bullet points with the presenter reading them and it's not even a contest.
    My greatest speech secret is to practice my presentation at a Toastmasters meeting before giving it to the intended audience and get written feedback from everyone. This has been so helpful and has saved me from unintended embarrassment many times.
    While I really like Keynote and using a MacBook, it's nice to have a backup copy in an older version of Powerpoint saved on a memory stick just in case you have to use the site computer. My greatest fear (and it has happened numerous times) is that my laptop will not sync with the location's projector and I have to use their computer with an old version of MS Powerpoint. Old Powerpoint is not great but it beats nothing at all…
    My recent post Do You Have a Heartfelt Goal?

  • http://www.Visualcv.com/alfon Daniel

    Michael,

    Thanks for this great list. I started using http://www.sprixi.com as an image search engine with built-in credit options. It may not cover all iStockPhoto covers, but as a free alternative – what do you think of it?

  • http://www.Visualcv.com/alfon Daniel

    Michael,

    Thanks for this great list. I started using http://www.sprixi.com as an image search engine with built-in credit options. It may not cover all iStockPhoto covers, but as a free alternative – what do you think of it?

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/Geoffreywebb Geoff Webb

    This is great, Michael. You're right on. We teach this stuff and you wouldn't believe how many people fight us on basics like "you're the presentation, not your slides."

    The only addition I have is on projectors. If you present a lot, it pays to have a projector that has enough lumens that it can be seen in in a well lit room so people won't feel the need to turn the lights down. It will also ensure your colors remain consistent.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/Geoffreywebb Geoff Webb

    This is great, Michael. You're right on. We teach this stuff and you wouldn't believe how many people fight us on basics like "you're the presentation, not your slides."

    The only addition I have is on projectors. If you present a lot, it pays to have a projector that has enough lumens that it can be seen in in a well lit room so people won't feel the need to turn the lights down. It will also ensure your colors remain consistent.

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  • Jasmine Grimm

    I like your ideas a lot, Michael. I'm going to add them to my brainstorming bin for when I have to give future presentations. Thus far, when I give a speech, I've written it in advance and then I give to to an artist named Brent Hughes. He sketches out the story as he sees it, puts it in flash and then puts it in a Nxtbook. Then, when I'm speaking, the pages turn to illustrate what I'm talking about. You can see an example here: http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/NXTbook/jzspBook_

  • Anonymous

    Love the list Michael. I’ve made it a point to reconnect with Chip & Dan Heath’s Made To Stick once a year. I don;t do presentation like you do, but I find the book and their content extremely helpful. I need to interact with Keynote – based on your comments, I will probably swear off PowerPoint!

  • http://pastorblog.hickorywithepc.org Ed Eubanks, Jr.

    Mike, thanks for the list. Mine is nearly identical.

    Because I do a lot of teaching (not just presentation), I also use charts, diagrams, and graphics of the non-photographic type. When I need to build a simple diagram or chart like this, I’ll usually build it in OmniGraffle (also from the Omni Group of OmniOutliner infamy). I find I can build a very clean, colorful, and readable diagram that I can easily export to a graphic format usable in Keynote— and the Alpha tools in Keynote let me clean it up to marry seamlessly with my slides. (As a bonus, I’ll usually print off the diagram, chart, etc. and provide them to my class/audience after my presentation— but not as handouts DURING it.)

    I love iStockPhoto too— but I usually start at Stock Xchange (http://sxc.hu) because many of the images there are royalty-free and cost-free.

    Finally, I’ve tried the Keyspan remote and it is great. I prefer the Logitech Cordless Presenter (2.4 Ghz). I’m not sure they still make this one, but it can still be had new online (from Amazon and other sites). It’s compact and fits in my hand, but it doesn’t get “lost” in my big paw like some — including the Apple Remote! I also like the built-in countdown timer, which warns you with a gentle, silent vibration when you’re getting close to being out of time. It also has a built-in laser pointer for the occasional need. I’ve had mine for years, and it hasn’t even shown a hint of wearing out; batteries last for ages, too.

  • Larry

    I am youth pastor and I use Keynote Remote on my IPad that sits on a stand. LOVE IT. The kids thinks its cool and I can see my notes from it.

  • http://twitter.com/PIBarrington P.I. Barrington

    Great list Michael and while I use your tools a lot, these seem a bit intimidating! I’m still back in the pleistocene era of computing and software, lol!

  • Jeff

    I love these type of “how I do it” posts. Buy, your missing a backup plan. I always save my keynote presentation as a PDF to a flash drive. Worst case I can flip though a pdf document. Since I am an engineer, I often have the only Mac in the room.

  • Jeff

    Oh, and I too use a good bit of video so I find a pair of very portable Chill Pill speakers invaluable.

    • http://TillerFamily.org/ John Tiller

      Up to how big of a room will the Chill Pill’s work well, Jeff?

  • http://www.cheriblogs.info Cheri Gregory

    I walk and gesture when I speak, so I travel with my own Carvin headset microphone.

    • http://TillerFamily.org/ John Tiller

      Great idea Cheri!  That way you don’t have to mess with the house headsets used by others.  Many times I do a sound check with an onsite mic that goes fine.  Then 5 mins into my presentation, the cord starts flailing or the hook comes off my ear because it wasn’t set right.  Having my own headset would solve that.  

      Do you ever experience connectivity issues between your set and the house sound system?

      • http://www.cheriblogs.info Cheri Gregory

        John –

        “Having my own headset would solve that. ”

        Exactly! One less thing to “cross your fingers” won’t go wrong.

        “Do you ever experience connectivity issues between your set and the house sound system?”

        I’ve not had any trouble thus far. I carry a passel of adapters and cords…one of them always ends up being what the sound engineer needs! 

        And I keep my own roll of medical tape to stick the mic to my cheek, hidden by my hair.

        I also carry a full package of batteries and personally put a new one in my power pack prior to each speaking session. (We use the “barely-used” ones at home until they die.)

        Oh — and an extra package of pop guards (the little foam tips for the end of the mic) since I enunciate a little too well when I get going. :-)

        • http://TillerFamily.org/ John Tiller

          I love it! That’s good preparation!

          • http://www.cheriblogs.info Cheri Gregory

            If I’m being paid to speak, I figure I’m being paid to be as fully prepared as possible, including being ready for contingencies.

            I get accused of being OCD, but never by the event planner or sound technicians. And they’re the ones whose opinions actually matter to me!  :-)

  • http://twitter.com/lesposen lesposen

    Hi Michael, very nice list. So glad you included Box3D – a little secret app which blows people, away including the Keynote team at Apple to whom I demoed it a few years ago.

    Now, a couple of additions from someone who teaches others how to use Keynote to its best (as at Mavworld this year):

    1. Voila – a great screenshot app which allows lots of finessing of the image. Cheap and truly magical

    2. Screenflow 3 – while Voila can do screen movies, Screenflow is the best for the Mac. You can combine Keynote output as Quicktime movies with audio and other movies and great export options.

    3. Art Text 2 or Typestyler – when you really need some classy special font effects, stylised images and things Keynote just can’t do.

    4. Doceri – I use my iPad as a second monitor, wirelessly, so I don’t have to look over my shoulder at the projected screen, using Doceri. You can show the presenter or mirrored display on the iPad, control it, and even annotate over slides. You need an app for the iPad and a desktop app too. Around $60

    5. Kensington Wireless remote – two models, I lost my cheaper model, so just ordered the beefed up version from Amazon for around $60 delivered. The USB part plugs into the remote so you don’t lose it when not in use (a real boon) and on this newer model also has 2GB memory so you’re not using up two valuable USB slots on the Macbook Pro!

    6. Novamind Pro – like Omnioutliner, a way to plan your presentation before going to Keynote, beautifully links to movies and other files. And it’s from an Aussie developer.

    7. Elmedia player – for downloading flash movies and other embedded files when your browser plugins fail; then AnyMediaConverter to convert Flash to mp4.

    8. Epson Projector – Because my presentations really count, I shlep this with me for those just in case times. Has HDMI input so I have a Thunderbolt -> HDMI adapter. About 3lbs. and comes in my handheld backpack.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Wow. Thanks for sharing these awesome resources!

  • http://www.facebook.com/arieldlevin Ariel Levin

    Hi Michael 
    I wasn’t aware of Box Shot 3D. 
    Snapz Pro X so thanks for mentioning them.
    I’m using an animated presentations tool called PowToon – soon to be released in beta. You can Goggle PowToon or type PowToon in YouTube to see what they look like – pretty awesome and keeps my audience smiling.
    Keep running!
    Ariel 

  • Jeremy

    Mike what do you do, if anything, for supporting audio to go along with your video? Do you use some sort of mini-portable PA? Most companies don’t have audio availability.

    thanks,
    Jeremy

    • http://michaelhyatt.com/ Michael Hyatt

      Almost all of the events I speak at have house audio available. I just plug into that.

  • jrwhitehurst

    Am I the only one who uses Flannelgraph boards still? 

    • jrwhitehurst

      JK.  Solid info Michael!

  • Tim W.

    This is great!!! Have you considered Prezi? It’s a great presentation software, easy to use, saved as a .pdf, and can look quite impressive! What are your thoughts on that?

    • http://michaelhyatt.com/ Michael Hyatt

      I like Prezi a lot. I have played with the demo, but never used it for a real, live presentation. I’d like to do that. Thanks.

  • http://twitter.com/andyjanning Andy Janning

    Great list! In addition to using many of the great tools you listed, I’m doing all of my presentations exclusively from my iPad. It’s even easier to connect it to any projector than my trusty MacBook Pro and works like a charm with Keynote Remote in iPhone. Even though the iPad version of Keynote doesn’t have all of the fonts and transitions included in the desktop version, that is hardly an issue; like you, I’m much more focused on telling the story via pictures and video than I am about font choices and going overboard on animations. 

  • http://michaelhyatt.com/ Michael Hyatt

    Cool. Thanks for sharing that.

  • http://twitter.com/HelenLeeAuthor Helen Lee

    I recently purchased KeySpan Remote, but it didn’t work for me and my MacBook Air, supposedly because I have the Lion OS. Have you had this problem? I haven’t had time to pursue this issue further to see if that is the real reason for the problem! But I am definitely a Keynote fan, 100% with you on that!

    • http://michaelhyatt.com/ Michael Hyatt

      No problems here. I use the KeySpan exclusively and almost every week. It works flawlessly on my MacBook Air with Mountain Lion OSX installed.

  • http://michaelhyatt.com/ Michael Hyatt

    Thanks for visiting, Shandra. Yes, good things do come from Canada. I always enjoy visiting.

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  • Chuck

    Thank you Mike. Can you tell me what the best remote is for a Macbook Air (2011)? Or does the one you recommend above work with that also.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com/ Michael Hyatt

      Yes, it is the one I use with my MacBook Air. It is awesome!

  • John

    Michael, thank you for sharing your tips and tools. As a deacon, do you deliver sermons? If so, what tools are helpful? OmniOutliner?

    • http://michaelhyatt.com/ Michael Hyatt

      I rarely preach, but I speak about 50 times a year. Yes, I use OmniOutliner Professional. That’s where every speech starts.

  • http://www.janthompson.com/ Jan Thompson

    Love Keynote. It helps me remember my taking points. Also, I can change the design/layout anytime, up to the minutes before a presentation. I like the way I can decide what to include in the handouts. 

    I migrated from PC to Mac several years ago, and never looked back, except for one thing. I read that agents/editors are still using MS Word. MS Word is bonkers on a Mac. Do you think agents/editors will start working in Pages? :-)

    TQ for the info on iStockPhoto. Been looking for a good source. Thanks!!

  • http://twitter.com/TMarieWalters Teresa M. Walters

    Love, love, love the book Beyond Bullet Points…it (and my MacBook Pro 17″) changed how I use slides to enhance my presentations.  

  • http://bigcircumstance.com/ David Faulkner

    Interesting to come back to this post after a while, with you posting it to Facebook again. One question occurs to me: how do you deal with the DVD editing now that Macs don’t have optical drives, or do you use an older MacBook? Have you had to add a SuperDrive, for example, or have you found another way round the problem?

    • http://michaelhyatt.com/ Michael Hyatt

      Yes, I have a SuperDrive that attaches via USB. Thanks.

  • toddvasquez

    I’ve used RowMote on the iPad in classroom settings to remotely control the computer.

    Also, VNC Controller works well for remote access to your presentation computer.

    I find the iPad gives more freedom to walk around the classroom and more screen real estate to work with. It is very nice for less formal presentations. The VNC app from your iPad mini is also great for remotely accessing your laptop while you’re relaxing on your couch or sitting outside.

    • Jim Martin

      Todd, thank you for mentioning RowMote.  After reading your post, I went to the website and was impressed by this tool.  It sounds like this might be very helpful.

  • Matthew Candler

    An amazing tool that I like for creating amazing slides for Keynote (or PowerPoint) is Slidevana at http://www.slidevana.com . The pre-made, fully customizable, slides for charts, graphs, comparisons, text, photos, etc. are simple, classy, end elegant. 

    • Jim Martin

      Matthew, I just followed your link to the Slidevana website.  This looks very interesting with a lot of potential.  Thank you for sharing this.

      • Matthew Candler

        Jim, you are very welcome!

  • Haanif

    Power point 2013 is very good actually.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com/ Michael Hyatt

      Yes, I agree. It really has improved.

  • http://www.sajigroup.com/ Saji Ijiyemi

    You are a gem! Thank you for helping all of us.

  • Jacqueline Buchanan

    I use a flipchart, some kinaesthetic materials and visual props, and, mostly I use myself to entertain as I teach and no tech is needed. But then I’m only a British teacher and not a materialistic, precious, American ‘guru’ who loves to boast about what he has and where he goes on vacation. I’ve listened to around 10 of your monotonous and uninspiring adverts, sorry podcasts and this where you and I part company. Goodbye Michael.

  • http://www.Cultivate.ws/ Twon Mai

    I noticed that you have a MacBook Air on stage when you speak. How do you keep it on stage without wires? Do you use Apple TV? Or is there something I’m missing? I usually have to keep my Macbook with my sound guy and speak from memory. I tried to look everywhere on your website but I can’t find anything.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com/ Michael Hyatt

      I put the MacBook Air on a cocktail table. I run power, audio, and video out of it. I do this everywhere I speak, and it’s rarely a problem. I run Keynote from it in Presenter view, so it displays my notes and my slides at the same time. Hope that helps.

      • http://www.Cultivate.ws/ Twon Mai

        Thanks so much for getting back to me! Wow! I didn’t expect a response this fast. I’ll definitely let my friends know about how much you care about your audience. Your book, “Platform” had a big impact on me by the way. Thank you!

        In a big room where the projector and/or screen is far away from the stage, do you have to use long cables? Or is this a better question for a tech guy?

        • http://michaelhyatt.com/ Michael Hyatt

          You’re welcome! Happy to help.

          Yes, they have to use long cables, but these are pretty common in hotels and conference centers. The event sponsor just needs to know in advance, so they can plan accordingly.

          • http://www.Cultivate.ws/ Twon Mai

            Sometimes I put on my own events. For example: I hosted an event in a downtown abandoned building. My artist friend turned it into an art studio. It was a rugged place but we made it work. I think I’ll go ahead and bite the bullet and buy some long cables in case I do more events like that.

            I haven’t had a chance to speak at a hotel or conference center but maybe one day! I am trying to make my own opportunities right now.

            I am building a ministry called, Cultivate. (www.Cultivate.ws) It’s fairly new. Your book, “Platform” pushed me in the right direction. I learned about the book when I saw you at Catalyst in Atlanta last year. It was great!

            Thank you so much!

  • gwally

    Have you ever tried Prezi? I’ve seen some very cool presentations with that – takes the whole slide thing to the next level. Would love to hear your thoughts!

  • Chuck Sigler

    As usual, I find your posts and your re-posts helpful. As a part time instructor at Grove City College, I see where your suggestions can help with the “presentation” slides I use for my lectures.

  • Shah Hameed

    Thanks for sharing the secrets of the trade! that’s being very generous.

  • Turner

    Mr. Hyatt, in the closing comments you suggest an Apple (Mac) MacBook Pro; can you personally or an assistant please clarify this resource one step further? Is the display retina or non retina; and is it a traditional hard drive or solid state? Thank you,

    • http://michaelhyatt.com/ Michael Hyatt

      It is retina and it has a 1 TB solid state drive. Thanks.

  • http://www.financialcoachingct.com Jeremy Fulton

    Great article; however Apple must have changed the link to the screen shot how-to. Found this instead: http://www.take-a-screenshot.org