How to Do More of What You Love and Less of What You Don’t

Do you have a long-term delegation strategy? This is the secret to moving more into “the zone” and getting out of those activities you don’t enjoy or don’t do well.

How to Do More of What You Love and Less of What You Don’t

Photo Courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/Yuri_Arcurs

Recently, I recorded two podcasts on the subject of delegation. The first dealt with the principles of delegation. The second suggested how you might delegate even if you don’t have a staff.

Leadership and the Law of Replication

My dad was injured in the Korean War, a few years before I was born. As a result of that injury, he walks with a limp. As a young boy, I unconsciously emulated him. I just thought that was the way grown men walked.

Leadership and the Law of Replication

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When I was about three or four, I remember my Mom saying to me, “Michael, you don’t need to walk with a limp. Dad walks that way because he was hurt in the war.” Regardless, I still walked with a limp for another year or so, simply because I wanted to be like my dad.

5 Ways to Energize Your Team

As a leader, you have an effect on people. When you leave the room, people either feel taller or smaller. This is an almost super-hero power, but, unfortunately, leaders are often unconscious of it.

5 Ways to Energize Your Team

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/Yuri_Arcurs

A few years ago, I met with an author I had always admired. It wasn’t our first meeting; I had met with him a few times previously. I had always enjoyed being with him and left our encounters with a renewed commitment to serve him well.

5 Characteristics of Weak Leaders (and How Not to Be One)

Sometimes you learn from positive role models. Often you learn from negative ones. This is one of the reasons I love to read history—you inevitably get both.

5 Characteristics of Weak Leaders

After watching Steven Spielberg’s movie Lincoln, I decided to review Team of Rivals by Doris Kearns Goodwin. I had read this book a few years ago. It is a page-turning account of Abraham Lincoln’s presidency and his political genius.

#037: 8 Leadership Lessons from Martin Luther King, Jr. [Podcast]

On the third Monday of each January in the U.S., we celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. As you know, he was the chief spokesman for nonviolent activism in the civil rights movement of the 1960s.

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Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/jcarillet

Dr. King was an eloquent preacher and gave a famous speech, “I Have a Dream,” that defined the aspirations of that movement, not only for his generation but for generations to come.

I think it is particularly appropriate, in view of the upcoming holiday, to devote a podcast episode to the this speech. I urge you to take time to watch this speech and experience what Martin Luther King, Jr. Day is all about.

While the speech is a masterpiece of rhetoric—one of the top ten best speeches ever given, in my opinion—I believe it also provides eight key insights into what it takes to be a truly great leader.

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Courage Is Not the Absence of Fear

I don’t like conflict. In fact, sometimes I think I am conflictaphobic. (I just made that word up.) I will do almost anything to avoid it.

Why Courage Is Not the Absence of Fear

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As a result, especially early in my career, I would keep my real opinions to myself. I didn’t want to get in trouble. I thought that if I just complied with the system and kept my mouth shut, I would get ahead.

#035: The Importance of the Leader’s Heart [Podcast]

We live in a very externally-focused culture. However, there is an internal issue which is largely ignored: the condition of your heart.

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/Johan63

The corporate world is increasingly aware of the fact that you can’t improve productivity without increasing engagement. In other words, people have to show up at work with more than their education, experience, and skills. They have to come with their heart.

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4 Ways to Keep Inspiration Alive

We’ve all experienced it: the large bureaucracy where the employees seem to be just punching the clock.

Beautiful young boy blowing dandelion seeds - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/ZoneCreative, Image #10467139

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/ZoneCreative

A while back I had to get my drivers license renewed. This meant a trip to the Department of Safety’s Driver Service Center. While the process was quicker and more efficient than I expected, the people working the counter seemed lifeless.

8 Leadership Lessons from a Symphony Conductor

A while back, Gail and I went to the Nashville Symphony with our daughter, Mary, and her husband, Chris. Mary had bought tickets for Gail’s birthday. It was a magnificent evening.

The Hands of a Symphony Conductor - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/StudioThreeDots, Image #18995017

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/StudioThreeDots

The orchestra was conducted by the renowned Hugh Wolff. He and the orchestra performed Beethoven’s Concerto No. 4 in G major for Piano and Orchestra. Horacio Guitiérrez played the piano. After the intermission, the orchestra performed Rachmaninoff’s Symphonic Dances, Op. 45.

How to Get Your Boss to Say “Yes,” Part 3

The ability to sell an idea or project to your boss is critical to your success. If you can’t get your boss’s approval when you need it, you are not going to go very far in your career. In this three-part series I share six steps for doing it more effectively. In this post, I cover the last two steps. (You can find Part 1 here and Part 2 here.)

In my last post, I wrote about how to prepare to make a presentation to your boss. To get him to say, “yes,” I encouraged you to prepare a brief, written proposal. I even provided a template.

Woman Giving Her Approval on a Proposal - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/nuno, Image #2437760

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/nuno

Once you’ve done that, it’s time to anticipate objections and formulate talking points for each one. Don’t risk getting a “no” because you haven’t carefully thought through the questions and your responses.

How to Get Your Boss to Say “Yes,” Part 2

The ability to sell an idea or project to your boss is critical to your success. If you can’t get your boss’s approval when you need it, you are not going to go very far in your career. In this three-part series I share six steps for doing it more effectively. In this post, I cover the second two steps. (You can find Part 1 here and Part 3 here.)

In my last post, I wrote about the importance of seeing your boss as the customer. To get him to say, “yes,” you have to first understand his needs. Moreover, you have to frame your proposal in terms of how it will help him accomplish his goals.

Man with a Laptop Against a Blackboard - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/mattjeacock, Image #19460301

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/mattjeacock

Then, you have to commit to success. You must be determined to get to “yes,” because your reputation depends on it—first with your boss and second with the people you lead. Once you have taken these first two steps, you are ready for step three.