How to Get Your Boss to Say “Yes,” Part 3

The ability to sell an idea or project to your boss is critical to your success. If you can’t get your boss’s approval when you need it, you are not going to go very far in your career. In this three-part series I share six steps for doing it more effectively. In this post, I cover the last two steps. (You can find Part 1 here and Part 2 here.)

In my last post, I wrote about how to prepare to make a presentation to your boss. To get him to say, “yes,” I encouraged you to prepare a brief, written proposal. I even provided a template.

Woman Giving Her Approval on a Proposal - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/nuno, Image #2437760

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/nuno

Once you’ve done that, it’s time to anticipate objections and formulate talking points for each one. Don’t risk getting a “no” because you haven’t carefully thought through the questions and your responses.

How to Get Your Boss to Say “Yes,” Part 2

The ability to sell an idea or project to your boss is critical to your success. If you can’t get your boss’s approval when you need it, you are not going to go very far in your career. In this three-part series I share six steps for doing it more effectively. In this post, I cover the second two steps. (You can find Part 1 here and Part 3 here.)

In my last post, I wrote about the importance of seeing your boss as the customer. To get him to say, “yes,” you have to first understand his needs. Moreover, you have to frame your proposal in terms of how it will help him accomplish his goals.

Man with a Laptop Against a Blackboard - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/mattjeacock, Image #19460301

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/mattjeacock

Then, you have to commit to success. You must be determined to get to “yes,” because your reputation depends on it—first with your boss and second with the people you lead. Once you have taken these first two steps, you are ready for step three.

How to Get Your Boss to Say “Yes,” Part 1

The ability to sell an idea or project to your boss is critical to your success. If you can’t get your boss’s approval when you need it, you are not going to go very far in your career. In this three-part series I share six steps for doing it more effectively. In this post, I cover the first two steps. (You can find Part 2 here and Part 3 here.)

When I was in corporate management, I spent a great deal of time listening to proposals. Those doing the pitching usually needed my approval to proceed with their project. Frankly, I was amazed at how poorly most people do in these kinds of situations.

An "Approved" Rubber Stamp - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/DNY59, Image #6618875

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/DNY59

In fairness, most of us never received any formal training in this important skill. As a result, we flounder about, not knowing why it seems so difficult to get to “yes.”

How to Manage a Micromanager

About five years into my career, I found myself working for a micromanager. He drove me crazy. He wanted to know everything I did and when I did it.

He required me to furnish daily status reports. I had to document every call, every conversation, and every action I took on every project. It was oppressive.

When You Feel Overwhelmed by Your Workload

I often write and speak on workload management. But even I occasionally get overwhelmed by the sheer volume of requests and assignments. I’m in such a state right now.

Man Buried in Paperwork - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/VallarieE, Image #9744255

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/VallarieE

In the last week I’ve attended board meetings for three different companies. Two were out of town. In addition, I have spoken publicly five times and am right in the middle of reviewing the copy-edited manuscript for my new book.

Three Lessons I Learned from Getting Fired

It’s easy to look at successful people and envy their situation. What you often don’t see is the pain they went through to get there. That certainly applies to me.

I didn’t eventually become a CEO because I made fewer mistakes than you. In fact, it’s probably just the opposite. I made more. In fact, I’ve been fired from three jobs in my career.

An Employee Being Shown the Door - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/nullplus, Image #10081269

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/nullplus

Each of these was a very painful experience. But these experiences also taught me important lessons that I probably could not have learned any other way.

7 Steps to Take Before You Quit Your Job

Face it. You will eventually quit your job. It may be this year. It may be next. It may be ten years from now. But it’s inevitable. It’s only a matter of time. The only real question is how to do it in a way that doesn’t burn your bridges. You never know. You may want to come back. At the very least, you may need a reference.

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/kledge, Image #5071987

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/kledge

Unfortunately, many people don’t always end their tenure at a company as well as they begin. The key, in my opinion, is to begin with the end in mind. As leaders, we should be intentional about everything we do—even quitting.

Book Notes: An Interview with Seth Godin

Recently, I had the opportunity to read an “advance readers copy” (ARC) of Seth Godin’s new book, Linchpin: Are You Indispensable? Admittedly, I am a fan. I have read most of Seth’s books. However, this is my favorite so far. In fact, I would go so far as to say this is the most important book I have read in the last year. In a minute, I will tell you how to get a free copy.

10 Things You’d Love to Say at Work … But Can’t

Thank God there is a filter in place between my brain and my mouth. If I said everything I thought, I would be in constant trouble.

women with her hand over her mouth

Yesterday, while cleaning out my closet, I stumbled across an article I had saved. It is called “Things You’d Love to Say at Work But Can’t.” It had thirty-eight items. Here are the first ten:

What Is It About Your Leadership?

Blame is the oldest game in town. It was invented by Adam who, after eating of the forbidden fruit, told God, “The woman whom You gave to be with me, she gave me of the tree, and I ate” (Genesis 3:12). In other words, it’s Eve’s fault. (And, by extension, God’s fault.)

picture of a woman looking in the mirror

Not much has changed since Adam’s day. Ask almost anyone why something bad happened and they will point to someone or something else. In my experience, it is exceedingly rare for people to stand up and take responsibility.