The 4 Components of a Compelling Elevator Pitch

Before you launch your product, service, or cause, you need “an elevator pitch.” This is a short summary of your product offering, including your target market and your value proposition.

Portrait of a Businesswoman in an Elevator - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/PlushStudios, Image #17385865

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/PlushStudios

The name comes from the idea that you should be able to deliver a succinct, compelling description of what you offer in the time it takes to ride an elevator up a few floors—approximately 30 seconds to two minutes.

The idea originated with entrepreneurs who needed to pitch their business proposals quickly to potential investors in order to secure funding. This enabled those same investors to quickly eliminate ideas that were ill-conceived or simply didn’t fit their investment profile.

Entrepreneurs often spend hours honing and practicing their elevator pitches. The stakes are huge. If they are successful and connect with a potential investor, they win the opportunity to present a more detailed business plan. If they don’t, they are sent packing.

The elevator pitch has become so effective that it is used in other fields as well. This includes publishing, movie-making, job interviewing, and even dating. It is a great way for both parties to cut to the chase and determine if there is a connection.

Why do you need an elevator pitch? I can think of at least three reasons:

  1. It forces you to achieve clarity yourself. I can’t tell you how many authors I have spoken with over the years who could not summarize what their book was about. They should have achieved clarity on this before they began writing. This is one of the main reasons publishers say “no.” It is also why you should strive for a clear elevator pitch before you do anything else. (This is the first thing I teach you to do in Writing a Winning Book Proposal.
  2. It helps you understand your prospect’s perspective. If you are going to connect with your target prospects, you must see your offering from their perspective. Moreover, you must understand their problems, their concerns, their hopes, and their dreams. Only then, can you put together an offering that they will find compelling.
  3. It provides a tool for enrolling strategic partners. In order to be successful in launching anything significant, you need help. You can’t do it all yourself. Whether it is a publisher, a record company, a booking agent, a publicist, a retailer, or a corporate sponsor, you need to be able to explain quickly what you are about. Only then can your potential partner decide whether or not he or she can help you.

Okay, so you’re convinced. But how do you craft a good elevator pitch?

First, understand that the pitch will be different depending on whether you are offering an information product (e.g., non-fiction book, speech, consulting service, etc.) or an entertainment product (e.g, novel, screenplay, comedy act, etc.). Note that when I use the term “product,” I am referring to your creative output regardless of the form. It could be an actual product, a service, or even a cause.

An elevator pitch for an information product should consist of four components:

  • Component 1: Your product name and category.
  • Component 2: The problem you are attempting to solve.
  • Component 3: Your proposed solution.
  • Component 4: The key benefit of your solution.

Here’s an example from my current project:

I am writing a new [Component 1] business book called Platform. [Component 2] It is designed for anyone who is trying to get attention for their product, service, or cause. [Component 3] I teach my readers how to build a tribe of loyal followers, using social media and other new technologies. [Component 4] I explain that it has never been easier, less expensive, or more possible than right now.”

An elevator pitch for an entertainment product should also consist of four components:

  • Component 1: Your product name and category.
  • Component 2: The main character’s ambition.
  • Component 3: The conflict he or she encounters.
  • Component 4: The real significance of the story.

Here’s an example from a mythical project about the modern composer, Eric Whitacre:

I am shooting an [Component 1] inspirational documentary called Cloudburst. [Component 2] It is about a young, extremely gifted musician who dreams of becoming a symphony conductor. [Component 3] The only problem is he can’t read music. As a result, no one in the music business will give him a chance. [Component 4] Yet he ultimately succeeds because of his honesty, optimism, and hard work.”

Obviously, pitches can vary widely, depending on your offering. Regardless, you want to create an elevator pitch that is clear and compelling. This is a prerequisite to attracting the partners and prospects you need to succeed.

Once you get your elevator pitch fine-tune, don’t deliver it like a mechanical parrot. Instead, do what Michael Port suggest in his excellent book, Book Yourself Solid, Chapter 4: use it as the foundation of a meaningful sales conversation.

Question: What is your elevator pitch? I’d love to get some great examples for my book! You can leave a comment by clicking here.
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  • http://www.leahadams.org Leah Adams

    Ok, I’ve actually done this but did not realize it had a name. So, here goes.

    I’ve written a Bible study entitled “From the Trash Pile to the Treasure Chest: Creating a Godly Legacy.” (http://www.leahadams.org/legacy/)  The purpose of the study is to encourage people to consider what kind of legacy they are leaving for those who come behind them. With every action and word, we are all leaving a legacy…the point is that most people are not intentional in creating that legacy. This six week study helps the student think through three key aspects of their legacy: their faith in Jesus Christ, their character (issues like lying, gossip, and being trustworthy) and their holiness.

    • Sherri

      Leah, I really like the title of this study. I also like that you talk about being intentional (or not) in considering the legacy we leave behind. I’m going to your link to see if this is a real bible study. If not, it should be!  :)  I am such a beginner with this stuff but as a reader it definitely got my attention and made me want to read more! 

    • Sherri

      OK. Just bought your book :)  Can’t wait to read it. 

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Thanks, Leah. Good job. The only thing you might want to emphasize a little more is the problem you are trying to solve. Why should I be concerned about my legacy? Thanks.

    • Michelle

      Leah, This is a great idea. What a legacy you will be leaving because of this! Michelle

  • http://perichoreticlife.blogspot.com/ Michael

    I appreciate seeing both examples of the elevator pitch. Having been in non-profit work and business, I am more familiar with the first one. Hoping to be a writer, I will think about the other.

  • Joey Espinosa

    How about something like this:

    I write a blog called  Mission: Allendale. Allendale, SC is the most impoverished area in our state. We moved here in early 2011 to be a part of the community and to be a part of what God is doing, for the ultimate goal of long-term change. I write this blog to inform the readers of what we are observing and experiencing, and to present opportunities of how people can be involved for good.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Great job. I think you need one ore sentence, right after your second sentence. Tell me (the audience) how the fact of Allendale being the most impoverished area impacts me.

      • http://twitter.com/EspinosaJoey Joey Espinosa

        Thanks, Michael. I really appreciate your feedback. How about something like this? Does it fit better after the second sentence or the end? Or maybe something completely different?

        “Decades of hardships and lack of visionary leadership has helped create a culture of generational poverty, and of consumption and entitlement, which drains resources from the state as a whole.”

        • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

          Perfect! (Just one grammar nit: “have” instead of “has”)

          • http://twitter.com/EspinosaJoey Joey Espinosa

            Thanks again!

  • Joey Espinosa

    I probably should have included my link in the post:

    missionallendale.wordpress.com

  • http://modernservantleader.com/ Ben Lichtenwalner

    Michael, this is an excellent post. Too many people fail to develop their elevator pitch and this is such a critical step in our ability to get the right team behind us, (as you wrote about here).

    My MBA concentrated on Corporate Entrepreneurship. As a result, I’ve written, rehearsed and even delivered a number of elevator pitches. Your four components seem perfect for creatives. In addition though, I learned the following additions can be helpful:

    5. Tailoring: What makes your product / service uniquely beneficial to the individual or organization you are pitching? Most people have plenty of opportunities in which to invest their limited resources. As a result, a great idea alone may not suffice. This is reflected in your point #2, understanding your prospect’s perspective, but I felt was important enough for it’s own component. Therefore, I suggest targeting key people you want to pitch to and / or expect to run into in an “elevator” and tailor your pitch for them.

    6. Call to Action: Sales people are taught to be direct. Make the request. AT the end of a presentation, make it clear what you seek. This requires tact though. If you don’t think you’ve made the sale, leave the door open with a subtle, “I’ll call you next week and see if you might be interested”. Positive their hooked? Then get straight to the point: “before I take this to another producer, I wanted to know if you’re interested?”.

    7.  Genuine Passion: Many pitches have all the right content but fall flat because the person lacks passion. You could have the best idea in the world, but if you lack the energy and drive to deliver it, the prospect may invest in another author, creative or entrepreneur. There is a delicate balance to this though. You do not want to overdo it nor do you want to seem phony. So practice your pitch many times.

    That last point is also critical: rehearse your pitch many times. I suggest the following, in roughly the same order:
    1. First, in front of mirror.
    2. Second, in front of a video recorder.
    3. Third, with a friend or trusted business partner / mentor.

    With all that said, here is one of my current elevator pitches, focused on a book about Modern Servant Leadership to a publisher with several books on this topic already:

    I’m working on a book you may be interested in. [Component 1] It’s titled Modern Servant Leadership and [Component 2] it seeks to spread servant leadership awareness, adoption and action with an emphasis on technology and contemporary leadership challenges. [Component 3] Many books on this topic are still rooted in the past but this book will shed new light and inspiration on the matter.[Component 4] In fact, I provide a framework and examples that encompass emerging technologies and societal trends to simplify and support servant leadership adoption. [Component 5] I wanted to ensure you were aware of this project before I introduce it to other, prospective publishers. I am aware of your many, excellent publications on servant leadership and [Component 6] would be honored to work with you.

    Of course, I’d be passionate in my delivery, which can be seen a bit in component 3. In that section, I express some concern over the current trend of publications.

    Elevator pitches can be very exciting moments. Not only in the actual delivery, but also in the preparation and pratice. I hope your readers see this and are encouraged by your post to have some fun preparing these pitches. After all, the elevator pitch is really a creative work itself!

    Apologies for the very long comment. As you can see, I’m a bit passionate on the topic!

    • http://successbeginstoday.org/wordpress John Richardson

      Great points, Ben. I had a chance to make a couple of pitches through the National Speaker’s Association a couple of years back to a professional panel of business executives. One pitch was to be 30 seconds or less and the other had to be 8 seconds or less. I refined my pitch over and over and thought is was well refined. After delivering it and getting thumbs down from most of the panel, I was shocked. How could I have done so bad. 

      I then watched 15 other people give their pitches. Most of them received the same treatment. I could tell a lot of people were surprised and frustrated. But then one gal gave her pitch and she got all thumbs up.Her secret was simple. She had a simple well thought out pitch with a call to action. It was a concrete proposal, direct and to the point. She didn’t use big words or business speak, but she had something important to say that resonated with the panel. And most of all she had genuine passion and a great smile. Her pitch just worked.

      My suggestion would be to present your ideas to a group of people that know nothing about you and get their reactions. That panel experience was one of the best things I ever did. It really opened my eyes to subtle changes that can take a pitch from thumbs down to thumbs up.

      • http://modernservantleader.com/ Ben Lichtenwalner

        Thanks John. That is a great story. I also like that you highlighted the critical importance of simplicity. This is something I probably should still work on in my own pitches…

        • http://successbeginstoday.org/wordpress John Richardson

          Thirty seconds is the average pitch length (think 30 second commercial) which limits your pitch to 4 or 5 sentences. As an interesting exercise, try to take your main idea down to 8 seconds (think jingle or tagline). If you can make 8 seconds work, you know you’ve got your key point figured out!

      • http://tcavey.blogspot.com/ TCAvey

        Wow!  That would be eye opening!  I wish I had a group like that to run my ideas/pitches with.  

      • http://www.tnealtarver.wordpress.com TNeal

        When you do it wrong but are confused, don’t get feedback, etc., then frustration sets in. On the other hand, seeing a good example–as you shared with the one woman–clears up a lot of the murk. Thanks, John, for a memorable story that produces understanding in the reader/hearer.–Tom

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Great comment, Ben. This is a post in itself! Thanks for taking the time to add these components. Great job on the elevator pitch, too!

      • http://modernservantleader.com/ Ben Lichtenwalner

        Thanks Michael. Yes, brevity, conciseness and simplicity are all attributes I continue to work on in my creativity. On a side note, I just realized that was my 100th comment on your blog. Looking forward to seeing you at Catalyst.

        • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

          Congratulations on 100 comments. Wow! I appreciate it!

    • http://tcavey.blogspot.com/ TCAvey

      Thanks for the added info.  

    • http://www.tnealtarver.wordpress.com TNeal

      You offer a post within the post but your points are relevant and your example helpful. Thanks for offering all of us more to chew on.–Tom

    • http://brevis.me Robert Ewoldt

      Ben, this is great stuff… I especially agree with #7.  There’s no substitute for enthusiasm/passion.  Somewhere I think I read that enthusiasm sells more product than anything else… I think it was in a book called “The Ultimate Sales Machine.”

  • Alan Kay

    Great advice. I like that the pitch will vary depending the prospect you are speaking with and from their perspective. As Steven Covey says, begin with the end in mind. I try to first find out what interests them by asking, ‘What are you most pleased about in your work?’    

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      You bring up a good point, Alan. Michael Port, his is excellent book, Book Yourself Solid, says that an elevator pitch should be delivered as a conversation. It is much more natural and effective.

  • http://successbeginstoday.org/wordpress John Richardson

    This is one of your best posts yet, Michael. This is so important, not only for marketing, but also for clarity of purpose. I took your framework and came up with the following…

    I am writing a personal development book entitled Strong Goals. It is designed to help people soar to new heights, doing things they never imagined possible. Through the guidance of our Pareto Time Management System, I show my audience how to make substantial and sustainable changes in their lives in just 12 weeks. I make clear that by using our simple techniques, their lifelong dreams can come true.

    This simple exercise was really helpful for finding the right words and phrases to explain to others what the book will be about. Hopefully this will bring interest to the project.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Excellent job, John. That is a very compelling pitch. Great work!

    • http://www.bethweststudio.wordpress.com Beth West

      I would read that book.

    • http://brevis.me Robert Ewoldt

      I would definitely read this book, John.  Great pitch.

    • http://www.needleforthechristianbubble.com Joe Lalonde

      Sounds like a great book John!

  • http://www.christianfaithatwork.com Chris Patton

    Perfect timing for me!  I have had this on my to-do list for my new blog for two weeks now, but have not been able to get it done.  I have tried several times to start, but finally figured out I did not really know what it should include.  I was stuck!  

    I was actually planning to attack it again this morning…now I can!  Thanks for the simple outline.  I will have it done today.  Of course, now I have written down my goal and must achieve it!

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Your welcome, Chris. Let us know now it turns out.

      • http://www.christianfaithatwork.com Chris Patton

        Michael, I am back!  Let me know your thoughts…
        I have started a new blog called Christian Faith At Work.  I am writing it to business owners and leaders who are trying to figure out how to integrate their Christian faith into their businesses.  By including the resources I have accumulated over the past eight years of learning to use my business as a vehicle for ministry, as well as real-life examples from my experiences, I will teach the readers how to run their business from an eternal perspective.  They will not only learn from the resources I have gathered, but they can also interact with someone who has been doing it for eight years, learning from my mistakes and victories.  

        • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

          Chris, excellent. The only tweak I would suggest is the second reference to eight years. I don’t think you need it twice.

          • http://www.christianfaithatwork.com Chris Patton

            Good point.  Even after multiple proofreading efforts, I missed it!  

            Didn’t you just do a post on that?

          • http://www.christianfaithatwork.com Chris Patton

            I have started a new blog called Christian Faith At Work.  I am writing it to business owners and leaders who are trying to figure out how to integrate their Christian faith into their businesses.  By including the resources I have accumulated over the past eight years of learning to use my business as a vehicle for ministry, as well as real-life examples from my experiences, I will teach the readers how to run their business from an eternal perspective.  They will not only learn from the resources I have gathered, but they can also interact with someone who is actually doing it, learning from my mistakes and victories.

          • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

            Perfect!

  • Sherri

    Here we go…

    “I have written an inspirational romantic suspense novel called Saved by a Stranger. It tells the story of a young woman struggling to deal with a decade-old tragedy she would just as soon keep in the past. To complicate things, she is also being hunted by someone from the very past she seeks to escape. In the end, she finds her faith in God and people restored by the handsome stranger that appears out of nowhere just in time to save her life and her soul.”

    This is for real. I really did write this book. What do you think?

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      I like it! Excellent job. I was hoping to get some fiction examples.

      • Sherri

        It’s a bit like Dee Henderson or Irene Hannon, although maybe not quite so intense. Is it okay to reference just the author, or would you include specific titles? 

        Thanks for the encouragement. I’m glad you like it. 

        • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

          Sorry, I probably wasn’t clear: I was hoping to get some examples of elevator pitches for my book. You provided one! You don’t need to reference other authors in your pitch.

          Thanks.

  • Robert Mwangi

    I’m preparing to participate in a tech competition where guys build(Code) viable solutions in 48 hours and pitch it for a chance to get funding to build the business. Heard of Garage48? Google it, it’s quite interesting. I think your post would really help me out.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      I have not heard of that particular organization, but I know of similar ones. I hope this does help!

  • http://findinggodsfingerprints.wordpress.com/ Erica McNeal

    My elevator pitch: “I have written a book called Good Grief! By the time I was 32 years old, I was already a 3 time cancer survivor, and had experienced the loss of 5 children, 2 of which I held in my arms. Unmet expectations and conflicts arise, when the person hurting doesn’t know what they need and their loved ones don’t know how to help. Good Grief! fills in this gap by providing tangible solutions of what not to say, what to say and what to do!

    • http://successbeginstoday.org/wordpress John Richardson

      I really like the title of your book, Erica. What an uplifting way to frame a very heavy subject. If I was a publisher and heard your pitch, I’m sure I would give it consideration. We have all experienced grief in our lives, but your story shows a way through it, by someone who has experienced grief like few of us could imagine. Let us know when it is published.

      • http://findinggodsfingerprints.wordpress.com/ Erica McNeal

        Thank John. I self-published Good Grief! as an eBook. You can find more info here: http://findinggodsfingerprints.wordpress.com/buy-good-grief/good-grief/ – and I am in the process of extending the original version and making a Military and Leader’s Edition as well that I will put into print with West Bow! =)

        • http://successbeginstoday.org/wordpress John Richardson

          That sounds like a great way to go. How has e-junkie worked out for you? I’m working on a couple of e-book projects and looking for a good payment solution.

          • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

            John, let me jump in here. I use e-junkie but don’t love it. The interface is really clunky, and the affiliate module is very difficult for affiliates to use. I am in the process of giving Cart66 a whirl with integration to iDevAffiliate. I am running it on my beta site now. It is too early to recommend, but the initial integration looks very slick and promising..

          • http://successbeginstoday.org/wordpress John Richardson

            Thanks Mike, I’ll check that out. I think your e-books would work well as affiliate products on my site. My current affiliate links get lots of hits but no sales. And Amazon is completely out of California. Definitely looking for a different solution.

          • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

            Thanks, John. The key is whether or not the ads, then the landing page, convert traffic into sales. I am planning to rework my ads this week.

          • http://findinggodsfingerprints.wordpress.com/ Erica McNeal

            Been offline all day… Ironically I learned about e-junkie through Mike’s blog back in June (since you were using it Mike). For me, being a total newbie and not “needing” a whole lot out of e-junkie for now, it has worked just fine. I needed something basic to handle the payment processing and downloadability (I might have just made up a word). Haven’t had any problems and the customer service has been great about answering questions right away. My eBook is a fairly big file with the graphics I used, so it’s been great for me to send out review links and see who has and hasn’t downloaded. Sometimes with an email, you never know if someone actually has downloaded the file.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      great job, Erica. You have an awesome story. Your pitch made me want to read it.

      • http://findinggodsfingerprints.wordpress.com/ Erica McNeal

        Thanks Mike! Gail has the eBook already, and based on the response I received after releasing Good Grief!, I decided to self-publish with West Bow. I am actually doing 2 versions: 1) an extended original and keeping the book biblical based, and 2) A Military and Leader’s Edition.

        • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

          Great! I like the two-version approach.

    • http://tcavey.blogspot.com/ TCAvey

      Amazing testimony.  I pray your book gets published, there are many who need to hear it!  

      • http://findinggodsfingerprints.wordpress.com/ Erica McNeal

        Thank you so much! =)

    • http://www.tnealtarver.wordpress.com TNeal

      Erica,

      First, your pitch snags my attention with the cancer reference and balloons general interest into compelling curiosity with the rest of your story. Your title suggests the book will be both helpful and hopeful.

      Second, I appreciate the practical conversation you’ve generated about Ebooks and self-publishing.

      Thank you for the information,
      Tom

      • http://findinggodsfingerprints.wordpress.com/ Erica McNeal

        Thank you Tom! That is absolutely my goal. Many “grief” books deal with the person grieving – mine takes a twist however, as my desire is to provide hope and healing for those loving the person grieving!

    • http://brevis.me Robert Ewoldt

      Erica, your pitch definitely caught my attention.  It’s hard to know what to do when someone around you is suffering–what to say to them, how to love them, etc.

      • http://findinggodsfingerprints.wordpress.com/ Erica McNeal

        Thank you Robert! I appreciate the feedback!

    • http://www.needleforthechristianbubble.com Joe Lalonde

      Erica, thank you for sharing your story! It sounds like you’ve been through a lot in life and have come out strong. Your book sounds interesting and I’ll look into purchasing it.

      • http://findinggodsfingerprints.wordpress.com/ Erica McNeal

        Thank you Joe! I appreciate it!

  • http://alexspeaks.com Alex Humphrey

    Wow, a fantastic point! I haven’t thought through my elevator pitches yet. When someone asks me about my product, it always seems to take me awhile to get it all out there, but I could answer them simply with something like this.

    Thanks, Michael! That helps a lot!!!

  • http://www.patchourplanet.org Patchourplanet

    Great post, thank you.  I’ve been working for 1 year on the “elevator pitch”.  It came together for me when it made sense and felt real, less like a sales pitch and more like a passion.  I love your insight, thanks for sharing your experience/wisdom.  We are better for it.

  • http://byphyllis.com Phyllis Dolislager

    My pitch:

    This
    small book chronicles twelve months/one year in our lives. It covers three
    moves, two job changes, and a death in the family . . . plus one big hurricane:
    Wilma. After move number two, we struggled to remember our address and our
    phone number. When we tried to update an account like frequent flyer points,
    they’d ask for our previous address, and we had no idea if it was Boynton Beach, Palm Beach
    or West Palm Beach.
    And for awhile our mail was being forwarded from all three cities. Our last
    moved put us in a log cabin home in the Smoky Mountains. No hurricanes—just black
    bears. Moved Out of Our Comfort Zone tells our story.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Phyllis, i think you need to figure out and state why this is relevant to your audience. What’s in it for them? Hint: It sounds like your book is about helping your readers deal with change in a positive way.

      • http://byphyllis.com Phyllis Dolislager

        Thanks. You’re right. I’ll fix it.

  • Sondra Gray

    Thank you, Michael, for the opportunity to post my elevator pitch.  I would really like your input!

    I am writing a new book about camping, primarily about
    camping with pets.  The title is Don’t Leave the Food Out at Night.  It’s for anyone who enjoys camping, and
    anyone who has pets.  My project involves
    interviewing campers with interesting camping stories.  They can be funny, scary or exciting.  It is intended to promote and introduce
    people to camping lifestyle.  

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Sondra, this is a good start. However, I think you need to articulate the problem you are trying to solve. Why is camping with a pet a challenge? How do you solve it? You explained your process (interviewing campers), but as a reader, I am after the result or end-product.

      • Sondra Gray

        Thank you for your help, Michael.  Perhaps I should make it more clear that I am not trying to solve the problems and challenges of camping with pets.  I am promoting camping lifestyle and telling interesting camping stories.  It is intended to be entertaining, not informative.  You have helped me realize I should point that out!

        • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

          Got it. Thanks!

  • http://www.josephjpote.com Joe Pote01

    I have recently published a book titled So You are a Believer…Who has been through Divorce… (http://www.amazon.com/You-Believer-been-through-Divorce/dp/1463767161/)
    discussing God’s heart toward His children who have experienced divorce. 

    The Christian church has developed a system of biblically
    unsubstantiated myths that encourage legalistic attitudes toward believers who
    have experienced divorce.  For “divorced”
    Christians, belief in these myths acts as a barrier, distancing their
    relationships with both God and fellow believers.

    I use a myth-buster approach to address seven of these misconceptions,
    discussing both the basis for the myth and what the Bible actually says, reviewing
    each verse in context of the complete passage.

    Readers of this book will experience the liberating joy of
    lifted guilt and renewed intimacy with the Father as each myth is exposed in
    the light of God’s truth.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      This is great. The only challenge I would give you is to tighten it up. Eliminate every word you can without changing the meaning. You are almost there!

      • http://www.josephjpote.com Joe Pote01

        Thank you for the challenge, Michael!  Here’s the newer, shorter version:

        I recently published a book titled So You are a Believer…Who has been through Divorce… (http://www.amazon.com/You-Believer-been-through-Divorce/dp/1463767161/)
        discussing God’s heart toward Christians who have experienced divorce. 

        The church has developed a system of biblically
        unsubstantiated myths encouraging legalistic attitudes toward “divorced” believers,
        for whom these myths act as barriers, distancing relationships with both God
        and fellow believers.

        I address seven of these misconceptions, discussing both the
        basis for the myth and what the Bible actually says in context of the complete scripture.

        Readers will experience the liberating joy of
        lifted guilt and renewed intimacy with God as each myth is exposed in the light
        of God’s truth.

        • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

          Much better. Great!

  • Agsteward

    I print my elevator speech on the back of my Calling Card, which has my picture on it.

    “You
    know how generous people often give CDs, annuities, 
    appreciated stock and Realestate
    to their grandchildren,
    Churches and favorite Charities?
    I serve those people. I 
    help them give more wisely. I make sure
    they get all the
    tax benefits and income – AND, how
    to “Super-Size” their
    legacy!” (often include…”you likely know people like this.”)
    [word count 48, 53 seconds]

    David Rockett

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      The only thing I would add here is a more specific articulation of the problem. What is the problem you and your service solve?

  • Loveae1967

    My pitch:
    My completed book, Elizabeth’s Key, is a historical romance set in 1893[compenent 1] in the north woods of Wisconsin. Elizabeth Stengle marries in order to access trust fund money that will allow her to move her mother from smog-filled Chicago to the clear skies of Wisconsin to improve her health before its too late [component 2]. But when her house burns, taking the life of her new husband, she’s left alone to make a go of the horse breeding business he started–her only hope to save her mother[component 3]. Homeless and penniless, she is taken in by elderly neighbors until she can manage on her own. But when their nephew, Jonathan arrives on the farm to help run the farm, he finds Elizabeth occupying the quarters that were to be his! Elizabeth craves the legacy of faith and love she sees in her benefactors[component 4], while Jonathan has taken it for granted. Jonathan’s blindness to the treasures he already possesses might just be the stumbling stone that keeps Elizabeth from finding a faith of her own–and from trusting the love she and Jonathan share for one another.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Excellent!

      • Loveae1967

        Thanks!  This is great practice, especially today when I can’t be at ACFW in St. Louis!
        My next challenge, if I understood you correctly, is to write the pitch for my current uncompleted WIP. You are suggesting that by doing that it will help me clarify my focus even before my WIP is completed, right!

        • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

          Yes, exactly. Start with the end in mind.

  • Agsteward

    sorry, forgot to click the box getting future comments!

  • http://joypatton.com Joy

    I’m writing a book called “From Ice Queen to Princess”  It’s a creative approach to the book of Galatians  that focuses on the process of how we transform and what we choose to believe about the gospel.  Women are often told we are God’s Princesses, but we are living like Ice Queens and Orphans and have no idea how to live like a Princess.   The Ice Queen, Orphan and Princess ways of thinking are found in the book of Galatians in Saul (pre-conversion Paul), Peter and Paul.  It’s a frank and authentic discussion of how a modern Ice Queen transforms to a Princess way of life when she believes the true gospel.  
    http://www.facebook.com/pages/From-Ice-Queen-to-Princess/210506845661400

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      That’s pretty good. I like the metaphors!

  • Holly D. Russell

    “I am writing a non-fiction book titled Reaching for Tassels:  A Woman’s Quest to Reflect God’s Beauty.  This book is about healing our brokenness and woundedness, and then learning that despite those things we can still reflect God’s Beauty.  This book is based upon my own experience of believing I was heinous, becoming desperate enough to reach out for the tassels of Jesus, to learning that I am called to reflect Beauty.”  

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      This sounds like a really good book, Holly. Thanks for sharing.

  • Anonymous

    I am
    launching a collaboration platform to maximize creative interactivity among
    Christians called Creative in Christ.  Christ-followers are designed to interact and
    to create together, but many obstacles exist which bring friction to our
    efforts.  Creative in Christ will facilitate collaboration using modular legal
    agreements and licenses which are user generated and that are acted upon using
    real-time apps and existing social networks. 
    Connected profiles, projects, tools, and resources will unite people
    with one another at every possible level. 
    A global ecosystem of collaboration and community will emerge spanning
    the spectrum of nearly every activity imaginable, potentially enabling every Christian
    tribe, of any size, to create together.  Creative in Christ will reveal the latent
    creativity economy in the Church and offer progressive tools to serve and to maximize
    its unbounded expression.      

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Thanks, Ryahan. Just a couple of thoughts. Can you elaborate on the obstacles? The more specific you can be the more compelling your pitch will be. Also, I would tighten up the last part to focus on one benefit. You can do deeper after you have their attention, but it feels like you are trying to achieve too much in this pitch. Thanks.

  • http://twitter.com/johnlambert John Lambert

    Ok, here’s my shot at it:
    I’m pioneering a base in Thailand called The HUB. It opens the way for new workers while also empowering the local people. We train everyone how to stay outward focused and use reproducible strategies, like simple church and context sensitive outreach. Where less than 1% know the Savior, we have an incredible opportunity to make a significant impact, but we can’t do it alone.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      The one thing you are missing, John, is Component 2. What’s the problem you are trying to solve? It may be clear to you, but you have to make it clear to your audience.

  • Officialbsj

    Thanks for another great tool…

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1054477681 Katy Lee

    On an interactive game site, Where Melody can fly, someone is aiming to take her down. In my inspirational Romantic Suspense, Melody is a glamourous, virtual-world traveler who has risen above her small-town, misfit life status, until the night her father is injured in a hit and run, and she must return to that home. Officer Jeremy Stiles, the man who eight years ago caused Mel to flee her town,  is the man in charge of the accident. He soon realizes this was not an accident and Melody is the target, being hunted by a predator from an online fantasy world he knows nothing about. What he does know about is a God who can show Melody she is the true creation and she doesn’t have to change who she is to matter. If she puts her trust in the true Creator, he will lift her like wings on Eagles and she truly will be flying.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      If Melody is the main character, what is her ambition? What does she want?

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1054477681 Katy Lee

        Great, thank you, Mr. Hyatt. Melody want to belong and to matter and has changed herself to do so, but when all that is threatened, her ambition will be to hold onto what she belives makes her worthy.

  • Mark J Kirk

    Thanks for this opportunity Michael! You’re a mensch ;-) My book topic? It’s this:

       We’ve heard a lot about family doctors who are throwing in the towel/closing down their medical practices. This book evaluates the causes of that problem and proposes an elegant solution – recapture the element of personal communication between the doctor and the patient.     The book gives all the details of The Wellness 100(tm) – an information gathering-relationship building system for medical practices to help them reconnect with their patients on a personal basis. It’s a complete toolkit in a book.
       The result of using the Wellness 100(tm) is that a family practitioner can care for fewer patients by caring for more of their healthcare needs. That leads to higher revenues. It is a real win-win because fewer patients will get more attention-better healthcare. 
       The Wellness 100(tm) is simple to administer, makes each and every patient meeting more interesting and pleasant for both the doctor and the patient. 
     – Mark J Kirk

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Excellent. You did a great job articulating the problem. So many people go right past that and get to the solution too quickly.

  • http://christinefaour.wordpress.com Christine Faour

    Ok  here’s my
    elevator pitch:

    I’ve written a book called Eat Where You Are: A Memoir in
    Recipes. It is a chronicle of the various phases and places I have lived in
    Canada and the food my family ate. Based on the premise that ‘everyone has a
    story’, each recipe has a story preceding it. For example, I grew up in
    Newfoundland, so there is a chapter called, My Newfoundland Roots. In this
    chapter are recipes for some great Newfoundland dishes and the stories that go
    along with them. There are also sections on My Lebanese Heritage, Cuisine du
    Quebec, Family Favourites, and more. My book is for anyone who likes trying
    some regional cooking and also to find out the story behind the recipes.
    Christine Faour

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Christine, start with the reader. Why would they want to read this? What problem or need do they have that this book would solve?

  • Art

    I help donors to create legacies for their family, friends, and the charities that they love and support. Art Stine, Gift Planning Director for The Salvation Army

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      This is good, Art. Short and sweet. The only thing I see missing is the second component. What problem does this solve?

  • http://twitter.com/GregLGilbert Greg Gilbert

    I developed and deliver a management training class called “Accountable Leadership And Results Management Training.” It stresses managing results instead of people and accountability.
    You know how people are promoted into leadership roles that were high performers themselves but are now thrown into a very different role of producing results through others?
    Well, I’ve taken over 200 years of personal and mentors management and Human Resources experience on successes and failures and have condensed this into the most informative, comprehensive seven hours they will spend in their career.
    I will remove all excuses for not fielding the best team possible at all times and provide the tools to improve results of all team members including the attendees. My attendees will leave with a game plan for success in business and life. At the forefront of their mind will be WHY their company exists which is to be profitable and sustainable.  
     

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Susi-Robinson-Rutz/1159582302 Susi Robinson Rutz

    Hi Michael, I just scribbled down my pitch based on your template:

    I am writing a new Christian ministry book called, “We, the Body.” It is designed for anyone interested in the wildly popular missional movement of the emerging church. I teach my readers that the body of Christ must be adequately prepared and supported for missional work to be successful. I explain that the body of Christ must minister to itself while it ministers to others.

    Btw, I find your blog personally inspirational and professionally instructive. Thank you for your work. You are assisting many people in many ways. 

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Susi, thanks for your kind words. This is good, but I think you need to add component 2. What problem are you trying to solve?

      • http://www.RenewingLight.com Susi Robinson Rutz

        Gotcha! I see that now and I’ll work on it. What a great help you have been today. I am encouraged. I am directed. Thank you and bless you. 

        • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

          Thanks for having such a great attitude. It is a mark of those I see who succeed!

  • Robert Ricciardelli

    Camano Island Coffee is coffee for life. We are all called to contribute to the good in the world and yet in a challenged economy and with limited resources, how are we to do this? Then there are the questions of where to give, who to trust, and what is the overall impact? What if you knew you could buy the best coffee in the world and at the same time contribute to the growth of sustainable villages. This coffee is triple certified, organic, shade grown (no caffeine jitters), and most importantly fairly traded so that the growers have enough to live on and grow their communities. Camano Island Coffee supports 43 villages that own their own lands and are not slaves anymore to land owners. Their children no longer are forced to work and can now attend schools. You drink coffee anyway and now you can be socially responsible while enjoying the very best coffee in the world. Change your purchasing habits and you take part in transforming lives with every cup of coffee you drink. You can contact me at agaperoad@gmail.com

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Good job. I like it. The only thing I would suggest is tightening it up a bit. Eliminate every word you can without distorting the meaning.

      • Robert Ricciardelli

        Michael, how about this? 

        Camano Island Coffee is coffee for life. We present concepts for maximizing stewardship for missions while providing sustainable  impact. We give people the opportunity to drink the best coffee in the world and at the same time support coffee growing villages go from poverty to prosperity. This coffee is triple certified, organic, shade grown (no caffeine jitters), and most importantly fairly traded so that the growers have enough to live on and grow their communities. We want to educate and encourage better choices for coffee drinkers so that can enjoy great coffee while providing sustainable impact to over 43 villages around the world.

        • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

          Very good. I like it!

  • http://twitter.com/dyuhas62 Diane Yuhas

    Wow!  In the few minutes it took for me to jot down the components of my elevator pitch, I was able to succinctly communicate the key purpose of my “product,” a Bible Study Fellowship for women.  It made me realize that more than knowledge and growth, more than pressure or prodding, the women I lead need refreshing.  This, in turn, helps me to design a fellowship where the main thing remains the main thing.  Thanks!  

    • Kwblock

      Ok, I’ll jump into the fray.
      Here’s my take on an elevator pitch:
      I have just written a book for young women, would-be moms or mothers of school- age children called You Don’t Have to Go It Alone; passing on wisdom about motherhood to the next generation. (proponent 1)
      In our current culture of overworked, too busy and stressed-out parents (especially mothers) many would-be moms haven’t received the mothering they need to create their own healthy families. Without strong families, everyone in our society suffers, either as a group or as individuals who hurt because their most fundamental relationships don’t work. (proponent 2)
      In this story of a young, pregnant, unwed and currently homeless woman seeking a stable home and the wisdom of a mother, I address topics such as divorce and marriage, what is true submission, how to be a godly example to your child, the power of our words and how to train your child to mind you with time-tested and Biblical principles born out of years of experience.

      • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

        Is this fiction or non-fiction? I assumed non-fiction until I got to the last paragraph.

  • http://twitter.com/CherylFinch Cheryl Finch

    Great post.  I would appreciate feedback on this elevator pitch that I have written for my new business venture.  Thanks. “Promoting personal growth and productivity in the workplace through comprehensive training, essential business support, and organizational development.”

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      That’s a good start, but what is the problem you are trying to solve? How does your business uniquely solve this problem?

      • http://twitter.com/CherylFinch Cheryl Finch

        This is a revised pitch based upon your feedback.  “In today’s highly dynamic work environments, each leader must insure that the
        organization has what it needs, when it needs it, in order to achieve key goals.  SC promotes personal growth and productivity
        in dynamic work environments using timely, comprehensive training and
        organizational development that combine to empower, affirm, and focus essential
        staff. Our staff is committed to your goals. 
        Your mission is our passion.

        • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

          Cheryl, forgive me for being candid, but that is just too general. I don’t have general problems; I have specific problems. After reading this, I don’t know if you could help me or not. What specific problems do you solve? Supply chain? strategic planning? staffing? training? inventory management? If you want to go deep, you have to get narrow.

  • http://tcavey.blogspot.com/ TCAvey

    Thank you Michael for the guidance,  here is my pitch… 

    I have written
    a Christian Fiction titled, A Long Run Home. 
    It is about a Christian teenager named Mia living in a world different
    than our own.  It’s a world controlled by
    the One World Organization lead by extreme Muslims, a world where Christians
    face persecution and death.  Mia is separated
    from her family and embarks on a
    journey that expands her horizons, tests her faith and captures the heart of
    one lonely Muslim physician.  A
    friendship develops that brings them an adventure that changes both their lives
    forever.  I am seeking representation to
    have this book published.  An opportunity
    to send the full manuscript or proposal is greatly appreciated.  Thank you. 
     

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      What is the main character’s ambition? What does Mia want? What conflicts stand in the way of her realizing her ambition? These are essential questions to answer in a novel—and in your pitch.

      • http://tcavey.blogspot.com/ TCAvey

        Thank you for the input. I had a longer pitch that I think better answers these questions, I was just trying to whittle it down so it was shorter. Thanks for helping me to know what kind of information to add.

  • http://www.lindajojenkins.com Linda Jo Jenkins

    Thank-you Michael, so much for writing this blog and giving
    each of us a chance to practice our elevator pitches—along with giving each of
    us feedback! I have taken time off ministry work and regular work to write a
    non-fiction book and it is now near the finish line. However, I did not do it
    the traditional way, the way the world says we are to do it. I found out in the
    last six months for a non-fiction book you need to submit a book proposal,
    outline and sell it before you write it. When I found that out, I was already three-quarters
    the way through the book. It panicked me for a short time however; I decided
    that it is best just to finish it. I also have a very small platform (not
    realizing I needed that until then) so I have been looking into ways to
    increase my platform. I have a novel idea that I have recently started working
    on along side the non-fiction book that will actually help to increase that
    platform—I believe anyway. Here are my two pitches.

     

    I am working on a non-fiction book called “It’s All About…
    Love.” The goal is for it to be a book series of “It’s All About…” The purpose
    of this book is helping the reader to understand that the only thing that can
    fulfill that missing void in their life is to have a relationship with God
    their Creator. We all want love and we are all looking for love, and this book
    help the reader to identify that true love only comes from God. The book breaks
    down into six parts. “The Beginning of Love, Love Never Gives Up, Walking with
    Love, Instructions from Love, Living in Freedom with Love and Lessons from
    Love.” The book explains Christianity to new believers and old believers
    alike—explaining why it is we believe what we believe. It also helps bring the reader
    into control over his or her own correct relationship with God and not relying
    on others to lead them. By doing so, they will be living without a feeling of
    anything missing in their lives. The book then helps the reader to come to an understanding
    and recognize that they too have a purpose for their own lives from God. That
    God has a job reserved just for them wherever He has strategically placed them
    here on earth. It helps the reader recognize that when they get into a correct
    relationship with God they then should become involved in the work God is doing.
    Working with others in achieving the goal God has placed on him or her; we will
    see a growing in the Church. The missions of the Churches globally will be strategically
    moving in the direction that God wants for each church, by God strategically placing
    His followers in the positions; He wants each of us to do. The other book ideas
    for the series I have are “It’s All About… Relationships,” “It’s All About…Devotion,”
    “It’s All About…Experiences” and “It’s All About…Encounters.”

     

    I am also working on a novel called “The Tourists.” It
    starts out about how a man finds his wife dead in the backyard one morning. As
    he is preparing for the funeral he comes to realize his wife is not who he
    thought. He has many questions and starts’ searching for the answers and it is
    not at all, what he expects or what the reader will expect. By the end of the story,
    each of us will encounter an understanding of this world we know and of ourselves.
    It will help us to see our own responsibilities in making this world and better
    place to live.

  • @MichellePost

    This is a great post, thanks Mr. Hyatt. It will help me move to a new path.

    I am writing a new business book called The T.A.P Model™ (Technology – Application – Plan). It is designed for anyone who is trying to learn about social
    media and how to use the various technologies of social media.It
    will teach the reader how to understand any piece of social media by its
    components. I explain how to break down social media by its components,
    so the end user will know exactly which components are the best for his/her
    business, and then how to design, implement, and measure a successful social
    media strategy.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Michelle, this is good. I would, however, state the problem explicitly (e.g., “businesses owners know they should be taking advantage of social media, but they are often overwhelmed by the sheer number of options.”)

      • Michelle

        Mr. Hyatt thank you so much, this is an incredible opportunity you are blessing so many of us with. I will definitely incorporate your advise. Michelle

  • Heather Marsten

    I’m writing a memoir called “Tell Me What He Did.”  It is a journey of healing from incest that occurred with my mother’s full knowledge.  I spent forty years battling depression, seeking help from therapists, the new age, and the occult.  Nothing brought lasting healing until I met a pastor who helped me forgive my abusers and let go of the pain of the past.  I hope sharing my story will encourage others needing healing from abuse.

    Thanks for listening about my story.  Heather

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Heather, retell this from the readers viewpoint. What problem do they have that your story can help solve?

  • JannFreed

    This is something I struggle with so I appreciate your helpful advice.  I am struggling with starting a business, writing a book, and developing a brand.  Any feedback is welcome.  Here is a stab at my elevator pitch for the book and another one for the business:

    I am writing a new book titled:  Self-Leadership:  A Survival Skill in Work and Life (working title).  It is designed for anyone who wants to live and work in meaningful ways.  I teach my readers how to live life on purpose and to encourage them to plan the next phase of their life and work sooner rather than later.  Since the economy is rapidly changing, it is critical to take charge of our own destinies in both our lives and our work.

    As the CEO of Jann E. Freed, LLC, I help progressive organizations create meaningful work environments.  The world has changed.  As the economy recovers, employee retention, engagement, and satisfaction will become challenges.  My firm has a focus of self-leadership:  manage oneself, lead oneself, and manage careers.  Since life is a part of work, the focus is on deciding how to move into our next life’s work that will be meaningful.   We provide a framework and tools for designing a Life/Work plan that becomes a survival skill regardless of age, but particularly valuable at mid-life transition. 

    Feeback anyone? 

    Thanks.  Jann
    http://www.JannFreed.com    (in the process of revising website, but need to be clear on the elevator speech asn branding first)

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Jann, this is headed in the right direction, but you are assuming I know the problem rather than explicitly stating it. What problem exists that your book and your business are designed to solve? Thanks.

      • JannFreed

        Thanks for the reply.  The world is changing and organizations and people are floundering trying to find meaning.  Most baby boomers are going to want a new model of retirement so they need to figure out what to do–a new life plan.  Organizations are floundering trying to find a new business models.  And organizations will struggle with retention, satisfaction, and innovation if employees don’t find meaning in work. 

        What about this?  Thanks 

        • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

          Much, much better. Thanks!

  • http://twitter.com/jamespinnick7 James Pinnick

    Michael,

    I love your advice. I have tried to par mine down to 25 seconds. Some people don’t even have a full 30 second attention span!

    James Pinnick
    Author
    The Last Seven Pages
    http://www.jamespinnick.com

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=67703074 Rose Marie James

    I am a classically trained concert pianist.  In order to perform, I am currently facing a financial barrier to entry.  So to overcome this hurdle, I’m teaching piano through my local community ed chapters in growing after-school piano programs.  This opportunity leverages my strengths to provide the necessary income to launch my career as a concert pianist.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Who is your audience? Prospective piano students? If so, this needs to be about them and their problems. Thanks.

  • http://friendedbyChrist.com Tim

    Wow, I’m really Johnny-come-lately on this one! I have a blog that has evolved quite a bit in purpose in its short existence. I have a small readership, although my mom likes what I write. =) So part of doing this exercise is shameless self-promotion for anyone to critique my blog and give me feedback. Here is my first draft elevator pitch:

    I write short, devotional-type posts with the intent of helping families engage in spiritual conversations. I want to propel conversation,  [comp. 2] because I don’t believe we really grasp what we believe until we’ve attempted to articulate it. [comp. 4] If we want to pass on our faith to the next generation, [comp. 3] we must do so in the context of relationships in which we can have these types of conversations. And [comp. 1] at http://FriendedByChrist.com we want to kick-start your conversation! 

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Excellent elevator pitch. It has all the elements. Thanks.

      • http://friendedbyChrist.com Tim

        Thanks so much for the feedback! The way you blog and interact with your commenters has helped me tremendously in understanding the potential of blogging.

        • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

          Great. I am so glad.

  • http://www.tnealtarver.wordpress.com TNeal

    How far does the love of Jesus Christ reach? I explore the answer in novel form, a supernatural thriller entitled “Dark Eyes, Deep Eyes.”  After an accident, the protagonist wanders through the horrors of hell with the  desire to escape his eternal misery. His every attempt ends in utter failure and only leads to greater despair. Can the Lord’s saving grace reach him even in hell?

    And can the author remain theologically sound while writing an entertaining plot?

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      That is certainly captivating!

      • http://www.tnealtarver.wordpress.com TNeal

        Thanks, Mike, both for your encouragement toward me and the counsel you’ve offered to all of us. I have learned a lot about you in your responses to others. Great example of intentional leadership.

        • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

          Thanks, Tom. I appreciate that.

  • Wendi Garrison

    We have been working on an Elevator Pitch for longer than I care to admit. Thanks for the tips!

  • Tammy Berkman

    I am writing a book called “I’ve Got the
    Whole Bible in My Heart” – the Bible Study That Sticks.  It is
    designed for an entire generation of Christians who have been to church all
    their lives, but fall away from their faith after high school.  By the
    time they reach the teen years, they have a sketchy collection of Bible knowledge,
    in random order, that is not enough to sustain or defend their faith.  
     “I’ve Got the Whole Bible” is designed to supply a kid with the
    whole storyline of the Bible, in the correct order of events, in a fun, fast
    paced format. With a “5 minute-5 step prep”, I teach parents,
    teachers, youth leaders, camp directors, and missionaries a short, easy way to
    teach the whole storyline of the Bible in the correct order of events. In less
    than a month (if taught daily), a week (if taught in VBS or camp), or a weekend
    (if taught at a retreat), kids (or adults) who have never learned the whole
    storyline of the Bible come away with a working knowledge of the Bible, a big
    picture of God, a Biblical world view, and enough of God’s word to sustain
    their faith. 
    Tammy Berkman 
    TeachthewholeBible.com

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      I think you hit the mark. It could be tightened up a little, but you have all the major components. Good work!

  • McNair Wilson

    For years now, I’ve coached authors (1-on-1) on elevator pitch for book projects—mostly with Jerry B. Jenkins’ Christian Writers Guild events. I also coach authors on public speaking for published books: “The Author As Speaker.” I always tell authors to write out an opening & closing, memorize, then use them conversationally with friends (changing a word here & there): make them natural. On elevator pitches: Have at least two versions: (1.) 30 sec. version that actually gets the (agent, editor, publisher) interested, and (2.) 60-90sec. version with more book content. Frequent mistakes: saying book title and your own name badly (too fast, not clear) and telling too much story, too many characters … “You lost me on the fifth character.” Big key: rehearse out loud!

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Great tips, McNair. Thanks.

    • http://www.tnealtarver.wordpress.com TNeal

      Excellent, concise information. CWG does a great job of preparing folks like me to become more professional as a writer. Thanks for sharing your experience and wisdom on this platform. This is why I find the comments as helpful as the original content.

  • http://twitter.com/GregLGilbert Greg Gilbert

    Michael,

    I’ve tried to shorten it but it’s difficult to do justice to the points. What are your thoughts on placing the elevator speech on the first page of your web site? It will either spark interest or they will leave.

    I developed and deliver a management training course called Accountable Leadership And Results Management Training, ALARMT for short. We discovered that when high performers are promoted, they are expected to produce results through others with little or no training. Some are provided only online training that give no opportunity for interaction. We also discovered through our surveys that managers go years without refresher training. We provide that training in a one day comprehensive course to new and experienced front line managers and supervisors. We provide this training with real life examples of successes and failures that remove the drama from handling personnel issues. What makes us different is we come to our customer which minimizes their travel expense and time away from the job. This also provides an interactive training experience not allowed by online training. There are two types of training, equipping and developing. Most companies equip their team but few focus on developing the person. ALARMT provides both. 

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      If you are going to use it on your site, I would start with the problem, then transition into the solution. I still think you can make it shorter. Remember: the elevator pitch does not have to tell the whole story and should leave the hearer wanting more.

  • http://brevis.me Robert Ewoldt

    You’ve got to practice your elevator pitch.  It can’t seem contrived.  It has to be natural.

  • http://www.TestMyMessage.com Brian Schmitt

    Elevator Pitch for new business called Test My Message.

    Testing Copy Reduces Your Risk

    Don’t disappoint your
    readers with untested copy. Craft and perfect a crisp, actionable and compelling
    message before you communicate with your readers. Our copywriting experts
    review and comment on your copy before you publish.  TestMyMessage.com http://www.testmymessage.com.  – simple – affordable- essential when you
    most need clarity.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Love this concept. You totally got my attention!

  • http://sandielzinga.wordpress.com/ Sandi Elzinga

    Great post, Michael!
    Here’s my elevator pitch:

    Have you felt your mind collapse in the middle of a sentence? Been weary to the marrow of your bones? Had six weeks of morning sickness and you’re not pregnant? That’s crazy grief.
    My non-fiction manuscript, Grief Can Make You Crazy: Finding Rest in the Eye of the Storm, focuses in depth, on these and other  lesser-known manifestations of loss. It is written to point grieving readers to the true rest found in God alone, and to reassure them their “off the wall” feelings are normal under the circumstances.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Very good, Sandi. Good description of the problem.

      • http://sandielzinga.wordpress.com/ Sandi Elzinga

        Thanks, Michael! 

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Lori-Tracy-Boruff/1630483795 Lori Tracy Boruff

    I’m a little late getting in on the action but would love some feedback from anyone…

    “My book is called Finding Hope in the Ruins, A Survival Guide During Personal 9/11’s.  When our world crashes around us, how do we find HOPE buried under layers of living? How do we go from survive to thrive? My search and recovery guide for hearts in crisis offers tools needed to dig through emotional pain to find hope again. Hope is essential for living. Hope makes things happen. There is always HOPE in the ruins-but how do we get to it before we give up or when we are weary? When readers apply the proven principals of how- to process emotional pain they will enjoy a life-time of living pain free and help others do the same.”

    thoughts anyone?

  • http://www.facebook.com/evan.davis7 Evan Davis

    Great Post! Been trying to refine my elevator pitch. It goes something like this:

    I am producing a feature documentary film called It’s a Girl! In India, China and many other parts of the world today, girls
    are killed, aborted and abandoned simply because they are girls. The
    United Nations estimates as many as 200 million girls are missing in the world today because of this so-called “gendercide”. The film tells the stories of abandoned and trafficked girls, of women
    who suffer extreme dowry-related violence, of brave mothers fighting to
    save their daughters’ lives, and of other mothers who would kill for a
    son. We have global experts and grassroots activists put the stories in context
    and advocate different paths towards change. Our goal is to educate and mobilize a movement of people who will fight to end what is quickly becoming the greatest human rights issue of our time.

    BTW, you can check out our new trailer at http://itsagirlmovie.com (shameless plug :)

    • http://brevis.me Robert Ewoldt

      Evan, that was a good pitch. It made me go to your website and watch the trailer, at least :) The trailer was fascinating, and I signed up for your email updates. I look forward to the release!

      • http://www.facebook.com/evan.davis7 Evan Davis

        Thanks Robert! Very encouraging.

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  • Anonymous

    I’ll take a whack at it, please…

    I’m developing a content management system for local weather information.  Since there is no competitive advantage to automated weather data, local television stations, which depend on weather segments to drive viewers, need to provide better, digital weather strategies.  The Weather Drops system allows local meteorologists to provide personality driven information that directly affects local users on a time scale from 5 minutes to no more than 3 hours.  The current offerings provide “Partly cloudy, 72.”  A Weather Drop might read, “Watch out for tumbleweeds between now and lunchtime.  The wind will be gusting over 40 miles per hour.”  Local stations will be able to lure users back from national competitors and increase the number of user interactions by updating the data more frequently through the day, creating a better environment for advertisers.Thanks.

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  • Linda Jo Jenkins

    Thanks so much for this wonderful enlighting post! I have learned from reading all the pitches and the reactions. I will be refining my own elevator pitch!

  • http://radardetectorcatalog.com/ Alexander Thornade

    Interesting post!! I really like this site, and hope you
    will write more, thanks for your information.

  • http://twitter.com/GregLGilbert Greg Gilbert

    Thanks for the counsel Michael. I’ve trimmed it down to 78 words: I developed and deliver a management training course called Accountable Leadership And Results Management Training, ALARMT for short. Many managers are put in positions of producing results through others and are never provided the tools or refresher training to improve profitability and sustainability. Many still attempt to manage people instead of results. We provide those tools and refresher training in a one day, on-site, interactive session that eliminates manager travel expense and minimizes time away from the job.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Excellent. I like it. Short and sweet.

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  • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

    Thanks Mike! Your series of posts relevant for creatives is a great source of advice for any aspiring writers. Thanks for the splendid job you are doing continuously.

  • http://www.jeffrandleman.com Jeff Randleman

    Thanks for yet another creative asset!  As with several other posts recently, this one has been Evernoted for reference.

  • Anonymous

    I’m beginning today to coach a young author on a new book idea so this will make a very timely recommendation for him to resource. 

  • Tamara Vann

    Great advice! A winning elevator pitch will get business in the door. To keep it, however, you’ve got to back that pitch with quality and service. This video offers insights on why that’s important in all types of businesses: http://www.upyourservice.com/video-theater/service-culture-is-not-only-for-retail-and-hospitality-companies

  • http://www.needleforthechristianbubble.com Joe Lalonde

    I’ve yet to develop an elevator pitch. Thanks to this post, I’m now considering crafting a pitch.

  • Diana

    I have written the first of a series of three novels about the journey of  the ancient prophet Elijah, from his early life of searching for purpose to his final appearance in the afterlife.  In the first book, we follow Elijah as he first journeys to Samaria becomes connected to a crime, exposing the believers to possible imprisonment and death.  We see him grow from a headstrong, immature, seeker after God to one who is able to stand confidently before the king, but always wrestling with doubt. Is he really ready to take this step?  Is he really the person the others think he is?  Is he good enough to be of use to God?  Along the way he becomes friends with Obadiah, a double-agent for Israel and Judah who is employed as the king’s building director, a group of believers in hiding, Talib, an Arab, Azizah, a prostitute, Josiah, the leader of the prophets’ school, and Amanda, the first woman he has feelings for.   He learns various skills such as how to read the Bible thoughtfully, to listen to God’s voice, and how to pray and take action.    The purpose of the novels is to give the modern reader an accurate image of God, tools to connect with God on a personal level, and  a picture of what life lived with God might look like. 

  • Nedra Russell

    Here’s my pitch: “Adam’s Eve is an interracial romance novel. It’s about Eve St. John, a perfectionist who meets and falls in love with Adam Michaels, whose complete picture is breathtaking, yet less than ideal. Something in Adam’s past suddenly makes her shaky and cautious. Seeking God’s will, she travels to Kenya on a mission’s trip. While there, she meets another who tugs at her heart. Things take on a life of their own and Eve learns a difficult lesson – nobody’s perfect!”

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  • http://www.facebook.com/greg.brent Greg Brent

    Wow.  Great article and lots of very helpful comments from everyone.  Would love to get some reviews on the pitch below.  Any comments would be greatly appreciated.

    I own a marketing and event planning business called Music Powered Strategies. 
    Our purpose is to help artists plan, market, and connect to fans in the new world of music.
    We create innovative strategies that will help them provide
    visibility to their audience then utilize social media, and other digital media
    tools, to connect and develop relationships with their fan base. We are focused on empowering musicians, connecting fans, and making a difference in the world.

    Thanks,Greg

  • http://www.facebook.com/greg.brent Greg Brent

    Wow.  Great article and lots of very helpful comments from everyone.  Would love to get some reviews on the pitch below.  Any comments would be greatly appreciated.

    I own a marketing and event planning business called Music Powered Strategies.  
    Our purpose is to help artists plan, market, and connect to fans in the new world of music. 
    We create innovative strategies that will help them provide visibility to their audience then utilize social media, and other digital media tools, to connect and develop relationships with their fan base. We are focused on empowering musicians, connecting fans, and making a difference in the world.
    Thanks,
    Greg

  • http://www.StewardshipAdvisory.com Jeff

    This is my Elevator Pitch (forgive the highlighting as it’s to help me remember critical things.  Would appreciate your counsel!  Jeff Rogers

    What do you do for work?
    “You know, I have the best job in the world”!
     I help people:
    Ø Gain Clarity about their God-Given Life Purpose and Passions
    Ø Develop Increased Confidence and a sense of True Financial Freedom
    Ø I help them become Intentional about Creating a Family Legacy of Lasting Significance
    Ø Next, I Empower them to Impact Eternity through the Wise Stewardship of their Time, Talents & Treasures as well as their Leadership, Relationships & Influence
    Ø I then show them how to do all of that and get the Government to Pay for it through significant Tax Savings
    Ø And we do all of this through the Lens of Biblical Stewardship.
     
    Bottom line is I help people to develop a Strategic Plan for the rest of their lives with the goal of them hearing a “Well Done!” from our Heavenly Father.
    Jeff

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  • Anonymous

    “I am writing a leadership book titled ‘Creating Your Personal Life Plan.’ So many people have incredible ideas, passionate desires, and well-meaning intentions, but fall flat from achieving their goals and dreams because they get lost or distracted along the way. My book will teach the reader to not only figure out WHAT their dreams are specifically, but also to help them figure out HOW to chart a step-by-step course to seeing those dreams realized. In today’s world, where so much “noise” clamors for your attention, the key principles outlined in my book will work with you to keep your focus on the very destiny to which you were created.”

  • Gary

    The rocking acoustic duo, Garcia and Scott draws from a deep well of
    American music traditions. Think of them this way: dig a hole in the coal-black
    earth. Toss in a bucket-full of the Allman Brothers Band and Jimmy Reed, a
    shovel-full of  the Everly Brothers, fertilize with a
    trowel-full of Linda Rondstadt, Ella Fitzgerald and the energy of Tina Turner
    and sprinkle on some Latin-infused H-2-O. What bursts forth is a brilliant,
    bountiful bush filled with the fruit of fresh and flavorful acoustic music.
    Their energetic sound is uniquely…Garcia and Scott.  Find out more at:  www.garciaandscott.com

  • Debbie Frye

    Our book, Our Father Who Aren’t In Heaven:  A True Story of a Career Criminal.  Thirteen years after our father’s death, my sister and I were contacted by an adoptee looking for her birthparents.  From the limited information she provided and our initial research, we believed she was our sister and she was conceived in prison.  In the process of trying to help the adoptee we uncovered our father’s life of crime before he met our mother.
    http://www.OurFatherWhoArentInHeaven.com

  • http://www.orangedads.com Jesse Smith

    Thinking about modifying this for an upcoming announcement to our congregation…something along the lines of: 

    “This year’s Thanksgiving project is a remodeling of our space to provide for a central, easy to find Children’s Ministry Area. Our current areas are scattered, dated, and approaching capacity. By remodeling the four rooms in the southeast corner of the building and the current little lambs room we will have a central area, that appeals to our families and their children, is easy to use for our teachers, and provides room for those classes to grow in size. As we continue to reach out to families in our community, it is important that we are prepared to welcome them when they visit our building.”

    Then adding a call to action.

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  • eric silverman

    Thank you for pointing out the obvious.  However, having never looked it how to create the pitch your 4 bullets are perfect.

  • Adam Hoeksema

    Great elevator pitch tips.  I thought I would add an example elevator pitch as well:

    Do you purchase many of the same products at the grocery store each week or each month? [This leads the investor to say yes since we all do this at some level?]

    Don’t you hate the crowds at the grocery store, the lines to checkout, and unhappy workers? [Again you can lead them to say yes]

    What is those groceries you buy on a regular schedule just showed up at your doorstep? Each week you will receive an email with a list of the products that you typically purchase on that week of the month.  You simply uncheck any items that you don’t need that week and we find the store with the best deals and have the products delivered to your doorstep.

    We currently provide this service in 2 of the top 20 largest US cities and have grown to over 7,000 customers since launching 14 months ago.  Revenues are increasing 20% month to month. [Shows legitimacy, growth, and traction]

    We have raised 3.2 million in our Series A Round, and we currently need 15 million to expand our service to new markets. 

    Might I have your business card so I can follow up with a phone call?

    There are 6 more elevator pitch templates and real samples in my Elevator Pitch Toolkit on Amazon.

    http://www.amazon.com/Elevator-Pitch-Toolkit-Templates-ebook/dp/B006RL5C1S/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1325947908&sr=8-1 

  • http://www.thebusinessfox.com/blog Nancy

    The best point I read here is that crafting an elevator pitch gives you clarity yourself about your position, distinction, and unique value in the marketplace. Most of the others were good, but I didn’t see much here that was different from all I’ve read about elevator speeches.

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  • elevatorescalator

    Nice Post Michael.
    Elevator India

  • Schneider Elevator

    This four component is very power full to create elevator pitch ?

    and this is helpful for Elevator Companies

  • http://www.waynekroeplin.com Wayne Kroeplin

    Not sure if this comment area is still open but here is my attempt:

    I created a technology and innovation education curriculum for students who have the gift (super-power) of innovation and craftmanship. There are approximately 40,000 home school and private school students who have the gift (super power) but the parents and teachers of these students don’t have access to related training and curriculum materials and resources like most public schools.

    The courses I create fill this need and help homeschool parents identify, encourage and train students with this super-power. These courses will help parents and teachers to have the confidence, skills and resources necessary to teach these types of students.

  • http://www.aritcohomelifts.com/ Elizabeth Vaughan

    Wow! That would be eye opening! Make your life easy with home lifts and Platform Lift. Aritco offers the home lifts with great comfort, satisfaction and beauty it will increases the value of your home.