The One Thing You Need to Create Wow Experiences

Recently, I had an interesting conversation with one of our editors at Thomas Nelson. He had just finished a new manuscript from one of our biggest authors. I asked, “So what did you think?”

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/morgani, Image #6193434

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/morgani

“Honestly?” he replied, slightly hesitant.

“Yes. I want the truth,” I assured him.

“Not great.”

My heart sank, knowing that we had invested a great deal of money in this book and were counting on significant sales from it.

“Okay … so what’s wrong with it?” I asked, not knowing if I really wanted the truth.

“I dunno,” he stuttered. “It just feels like the same ol’ same ol’. I didn’t really see anything new here that he hasn’t said before.”

“That’s a problem,” I said, stating the obvious. “This project is too important to settle for anything less than wow.”

Inevitably, I almost always get to this point in a project. It’s a kind of “fork in the road.” I have a choice—you have a choice—either we can press on toward wow. Or, or we can settle for something less than wow.

In my experience, there are at least five obstacles to creating wow experiences:

  1. Often, we simply run out of time. The deadline looms. We are scrambling to get the product out the door. Or, we have to wrap up the service, so we can get to the next client before he starts complaining. We simply don’t have the time to give the job our best effort. So, we let it go. Half-baked. Before it is really done.
  2. Sometimes, the problem is resources. We’d like to do a better job. We sincerely want to take it to the next level. But we just don’t have the money or the man-power. We rationalize by saying, I did the best I could do with the resources I had. And again, we let it go and turn our attention to the next project or client in the queue.
  3. Occasionally, we don’t have sufficient experience. We just don’t know how to do what we know needs to be done. Our vision exceeds our know-how. We know what the product or service could deliver, but we don’t have the knowledge, the skills, or the experience to get us there. So, we settle for something less than our vision demands.
  4. Too often, we acquiesce to the committee. Perhaps we are a little unsure of ourselves. Everyone else seems to like it, we say to ourselves. Maybe they’re right. There are a lot of smart people in this room. C’mon, just let it go! And, so we do. We dial back our own vision for what could be and succumb to the collective judgment of the group.
  5. But the biggest obstacle of all is fear. In fact, I would say that this is the primary obstacle. If we are honest, we must admit that the previous four items are only excuses. If we had enough courage, we would find the time, the resources or the experience. We would stand up to the committee. We wouldn’t settle for something less than wow.

But what are we really afraid of? Perhaps we fear losing our job, our client, or our influence. Maybe we don’t want to be thought of as unreasonable or demanding. We are afraid of what others might say behind our back. Instead, we want to be liked.

Regardless, if we are going to create wow experiences, we must become courageous. This is a personal, psychological bridge we need to cross. What we want to create—that wow experience—is on the other side of the ravine. There’s no other way to get there from here.

So how can we become more courageous? That will be the subject of tomorrow’s post.

Question: Which obstacle to wow do you struggle with the most?
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  • http://www.kviconsulting.com/ David

    Great post Michael. At some point I have tripped over all of these obstacles!

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      The reason I could write about them is that I have been guilty of all five—especially number five!

  • http://www.kviconsulting.com/ David

    Great post Michael. At some point I have tripped over all of these obstacles!

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      The reason I could write about them is that I have been guilty of all five—especially number five!

  • http://www.boldpath.org/ Leary Gates

    Great post Mike. I think you're absolutely right — it takes a lot of courage to rise above mediocrity and group think! Looking forward to tomorrow's post.

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      I guess now I'll have to go ahead and write it! ;)

  • http://www.boldpath.org/ Leary Gates

    Great post Mike. I think you're absolutely right — it takes a lot of courage to rise above mediocrity and group think! Looking forward to tomorrow's post.

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      I guess now I'll have to go ahead and write it! ;)

  • marina

    I run out of time, mainly because I'm not good (yet) at delegating non-essentials. I am pretty creative, but I am exponentially more creative in a collaborative setting. I lack a solid group of peers/co-creators to sharpen myself and others. Bottom line: I'm realizing that I go at things in the same old way and don't try to fix what's broken before jumping into a new project. I also allow people to dissuade me from pursuing what I know instinctively is the best way for me to live and operate in my strengths. All this being said, I am proactively trying to address all these paralyzingly weaknesses during this next season of life. I am immersing myself in the things I know that feed my creative spirit! You are absolutely right about point #5: I've had to find the courage to move forward even if I'm moving alone and to be decisive about delegating and to do the things that others think are crazy, a waste of time, or don't make logical, linear sense. This journey, fueled by courage, among other things, is exciting, scary, fun, at times lonely, and intensely satisfying. I enjoy and am extremely inspired by and thankful for your blogs and Twitter feed. Life-changing for me in so many ways!!

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      Thanks for your kind words.

      It sounds like you are taking control of your life and holding yourself accountable for the outcomes. This is a huge step in the right direction.

      I'm proud of you!

  • marina

    I run out of time, mainly because I’m not good (yet) at delegating non-essentials. I am pretty creative, but I am exponentially more creative in a collaborative setting. I lack a solid group of peers/co-creators to sharpen myself and others. Bottom line: I’m realizing that I go at things in the same old way and don’t try to fix what’s broken before jumping into a new project. I also allow people to dissuade me from pursuing what I know instinctively is the best way for me to live and operate in my strengths. All this being said, I am proactively trying to address all these paralyzingly weaknesses during this next season of life. I am immersing myself in the things I know that feed my creative spirit! You are absolutely right about point #5: I’ve had to find the courage to move forward even if I’m moving alone and to be decisive about delegating and to do the things that others think are crazy, a waste of time, or don’t make logical, linear sense. This journey, fueled by courage, among other things, is exciting, scary, fun, at times lonely, and intensely satisfying. I enjoy and am extremely inspired by and thankful for your blogs and Twitter feed. Life-changing for me in so many ways!!

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      Thanks for your kind words.

      It sounds like you are taking control of your life and holding yourself accountable for the outcomes. This is a huge step in the right direction.

      I'm proud of you!

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/patriciazell patriciazell

    I believe my biggest obstacle to wow is being an unknown. Even though I can produce that wow, unless I have an entry point to people, they will never see what I have to give them–new understandings and new answers to old questions. I'm working on being courageous by building my personal bridge by venturing into blogging and by hoping that God will open doors for what I have to share.

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      I personally believe that great work creates its own audience. Sometimes publishers and others get this backwards. They think they must have the audience first. Unfortunately, it doesn't work that way.

      Be persistent, and the right people will eventually find you.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/patriciazell patriciazell

    I believe my biggest obstacle to wow is being an unknown. Even though I can produce that wow, unless I have an entry point to people, they will never see what I have to give them–new understandings and new answers to old questions. I'm working on being courageous by building my personal bridge by venturing into blogging and by hoping that God will open doors for what I have to share.

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      I personally believe that great work creates its own audience. Sometimes publishers and others get this backwards. They think they must have the audience first. Unfortunately, it doesn't work that way.

      Be persistent, and the right people will eventually find you.

  • http://www.janegmeyer.com/ jane g meyer

    I completely agree with the diagnosis–that courage is ultimately what makes a wow product. At the publishing house where I work (almost past tense since things are being squeezed) I've found that the best products come from at least a little bit of struggle. Our best selling teen book was shot down at every turn–yet we knew that there was a hole in the market and that this book would fill it. Even before we started there were nay-sayers. Editorially we went overboard to get the words right–I fought and fought over a better-than-average cover. I was scared stiff, but relieved when that book was finally sent to the printers. And now, it's filling that void and folks are thrilled. I'm thrilled. It was worth every bump and blow and questioning thought.

    And of course there's the other side. The not ready side. I'm an author, too, so I know it hurts to have your project shut down. But having your project put on hold means it will eventually be all the better for it. And just think of all the great virtues we (on both sides of the publishing aisle) can cultivate in the meantime? Patience, diligence, self control and humility. A mighty package of powerful tools at our disposal!

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      You are hitting on something that is critical. When things come to people too easily, they don't have the character to cope with the stress that success brings. I have seen many talented people crash and burn for this very reason. I think slow and steady is under-rated.

    • http://tammywhitehurst.com/ Tammy Whitehurst

      As a first time author, you have no idea what your last paragraph said to me! Thanks so much for your encouragement and wisdom! Patience is good…endurance is good….Through these things we discover the grace of God! Yes, it hurts to be shot down but God is with us and He will ease the pain, use the pain, and give you a JOY FILLED JOURNEY when you turn it all over to Him! I must agree with a recent post….WOW also comes by NOT doing things out of obligation, rather doing them out of passion! Have a fabulous day!

  • http://www.janegmeyer.com jane g meyer

    I completely agree with the diagnosis–that courage is ultimately what makes a wow product. At the publishing house where I work (almost past tense since things are being squeezed) I've found that the best products come from at least a little bit of struggle. Our best selling teen book was shot down at every turn–yet we knew that there was a hole in the market and that this book would fill it. Even before we started there were nay-sayers. Editorially we went overboard to get the words right–I fought and fought over a better-than-average cover. I was scared stiff, but relieved when that book was finally sent to the printers. And now, it's filling that void and folks are thrilled. I'm thrilled. It was worth every bump and blow and questioning thought.

    And of course there's the other side. The not ready side. I'm an author, too, so I know it hurts to have your project shut down. But having your project put on hold means it will eventually be all the better for it. And just think of all the great virtues we (on both sides of the publishing aisle) can cultivate in the meantime? Patience, diligence, self control and humility. A mighty package of powerful tools at our disposal!

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      You are hitting on something that is critical. When things come to people too easily, they don't have the character to cope with the stress that success brings. I have seen many talented people crash and burn for this very reason. I think slow and steady is under-rated.

    • http://tammywhitehurst.com/ Tammy Whitehurst

      As a first time author, you have no idea what your last paragraph said to me! Thanks so much for your encouragement and wisdom! Patience is good…endurance is good….Through these things we discover the grace of God! Yes, it hurts to be shot down but God is with us and He will ease the pain, use the pain, and give you a JOY FILLED JOURNEY when you turn it all over to Him! I must agree with a recent post….WOW also comes by NOT doing things out of obligation, rather doing them out of passion! Have a fabulous day!

  • http://www.studiochurch.tv/?page_id=7 Barry Whitlow

    I am in beginning stages of creating a "church service event like no other" in order to reach some of the 70+% of people in our community who choose not to attend any church. We will "produce" this multimedia and the arts driven event and use volunteers locally and globally via the Internet to produce the event content. Our GREATEST CHALLENGE will be making every event a WOW event. Our current OBSTACLE is casting the vision for this outreach ministry with little budget in a way that creates a buzz and attracts quality volunteer talent. Thanks Michael for sharing your knowledge – look forward to tomorrow's post.

  • http://www.studiochurch.tv/?page_id=7 Barry Whitlow

    I am in beginning stages of creating a "church service event like no other" in order to reach some of the 70+% of people in our community who choose not to attend any church. We will "produce" this multimedia and the arts driven event and use volunteers locally and globally via the Internet to produce the event content. Our GREATEST CHALLENGE will be making every event a WOW event. Our current OBSTACLE is casting the vision for this outreach ministry with little budget in a way that creates a buzz and attracts quality volunteer talent. Thanks Michael for sharing your knowledge – look forward to tomorrow's post.

  • http://www.stirringthedeep.com/ Rachel

    Great post. Often what encourages me is when I feel God telling me to be bold and courageous (which is all the time : )) as He told Joshua in the face of the terrifying, impossible, and far fetched hopes Joshua 1:9. With God nothing is impossible. If He is for us, then who cares who is against us. With him we have nothing to fear but fear itself and that is just silly. Thanks for sharing your insights.

    Rachel
    <a href="http://www.stirringthedeep.com” target=”_blank”>www.stirringthedeep.com

  • http://www.stirringthedeep.com Rachel

    Great post. Often what encourages me is when I feel God telling me to be bold and courageous (which is all the time : )) as He told Joshua in the face of the terrifying, impossible, and far fetched hopes Joshua 1:9. With God nothing is impossible. If He is for us, then who cares who is against us. With him we have nothing to fear but fear itself and that is just silly. Thanks for sharing your insights.

    Rachel
    http://www.stirringthedeep.com

  • Jenifer Olson

    Hi Michael,

    Good post! For me, the most difficult obstacle to a "wow" has always been the committee approach, which unfortunately is often informally mandated in today's corporate environments. While input should always be solicited and can be invaluable to ultimate success, the need to satisfy everyone can also become stifling, leaving a homogenized end product lacking punch and pizazz.

    Thanks – looking forward to your next post!

    Jenifer, aka @jenajean

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      I'm afraid you are right. I doubt that the very best, most innovative thinkers are good committee members. It's really difficult for me to imagine Steve Jobs on a committee!

  • Jenifer Olson

    Hi Michael,

    Good post! For me, the most difficult obstacle to a "wow" has always been the committee approach, which unfortunately is often informally mandated in today's corporate environments. While input should always be solicited and can be invaluable to ultimate success, the need to satisfy everyone can also become stifling, leaving a homogenized end product lacking punch and pizazz.

    Thanks – looking forward to your next post!

    Jenifer, aka @jenajean

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      I'm afraid you are right. I doubt that the very best, most innovative thinkers are good committee members. It's really difficult for me to imagine Steve Jobs on a committee!

  • http://www.wisewomenwrite.com/ Diane Owens

    As always, your posts inspire me, Michael! I agree that as writers much of what holds us back are excuses. With Wayne Dyer's help, I've been trying to combat my biggest excuse of being overwhelmed by lack of time and resources while writing the book I'm working on. Near my computer I posted Wayne's wise words from Excuses Begone: "I think only about what I can do now. By thinking small, I accomplish great things." I look at this whenever I tell myself I'm not good enough or don't have the time, money, or resources to complete my project. Following a prolific author's wise words has helped me bust through my excuses and have the courage to move forward. We will never reach the wonder of "wow" without taking small steps.

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      The Wayne Dyer quote is fabulous! Thanks for sharing it.

  • http://www.wisewomenwrite.com/ Diane Owens

    As always, your posts inspire me, Michael! I agree that as writers much of what holds us back are excuses. With Wayne Dyer's help, I've been trying to combat my biggest excuse of being overwhelmed by lack of time and resources while writing the book I'm working on. Near my computer I posted Wayne's wise words from Excuses Begone: "I think only about what I can do now. By thinking small, I accomplish great things." I look at this whenever I tell myself I'm not good enough or don't have the time, money, or resources to complete my project. Following a prolific author's wise words has helped me bust through my excuses and have the courage to move forward. We will never reach the wonder of "wow" without taking small steps.

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      The Wayne Dyer quote is fabulous! Thanks for sharing it.

  • Naomi Del Rio

    Michael,

    Question on #1.

    Do authors 'crank' out their books on a deadline? I thought a book gets published whenever the author finishes getting inspired.

    Once picked up by a publisher, are they on some type of contract to produce a certain amount of books?

    Ok well, this is a long question (smile).

    Thanks.

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      It depends on the author. Typically, authors who publish with traditional publishing houses are given a deadline. Scores of things have to happen simultaneously to the author's writing, including cover design, catalog copy, selling to retail accounts, etc. This happens months in advance of publication.

      In terms of the number of books, that varies by publisher and by author. Some sign one book at a time; some sign multiple books.

    • http://www.marydemuth.com/ Mary E. DeMuth

      The reality of the business is that authors and editors and publishers operate on deadline, not simply on inspiration. Which is why an author must train/discipline herself to be inspired every day through dogged creation of word by word.

      Of course an author is on deadline when he has been contracted to do so. Some authors have a contract for one book. Some have for six or seven and everywhere in between.

      • Naomi

        Thank you for your answers, Michael and Mary. Very honest and straight.

  • Naomi Del Rio

    Michael,
    Question on #1.
    Do authors ‘crank’ out their books on a deadline? I thought a book gets published whenever the author finishes getting inspired.

    Once picked up by a publisher, are they on some type of contract to produce a certain amount of books?

    Ok well, this is a long question (smile).

    Thanks.

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      It depends on the author. Typically, authors who publish with traditional publishing houses are given a deadline. Scores of things have to happen simultaneously to the author's writing, including cover design, catalog copy, selling to retail accounts, etc. This happens months in advance of publication.

      In terms of the number of books, that varies by publisher and by author. Some sign one book at a time; some sign multiple books.

    • http://www.marydemuth.com Mary E. DeMuth

      The reality of the business is that authors and editors and publishers operate on deadline, not simply on inspiration. Which is why an author must train/discipline herself to be inspired every day through dogged creation of word by word.

      Of course an author is on deadline when he has been contracted to do so. Some authors have a contract for one book. Some have for six or seven and everywhere in between.

      • Naomi

        Thank you for your answers, Michael and Mary. Very honest and straight.

  • http://www.flurrycreations.com/theblog John

    Mike, Yes, Courage I believe is the root of our obstacles. People either live beyond their glory out of ego, or under their glory. The latter I think is a result of fear, wanting approval of others as well as not believing we have what it takes. I recently got a chance to rub shoulders with 17 men leading in remarkable ways around the country. Each of them was delivering a wow experience in some shape or form. In our time together, each man realized that he was not living up to the full potential or ''glory" that God had given him. To witness each man believing a little more, that he had the ability to do the extraordinary, was wonderful and inspirational to me. We each have that something great inside us. Paul stated this boldly and humbly in 2 Corinthians 10:13 "We however, will not boast beyond proper limits, but will confine our boasting to the field God has assigned to us"

    I am looking forward to the next post!

    Rachel. Yes! Good words too.

    @johnflurry

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      I like the term "glory." For me, it is all about becoming the person God created me to be. I need to be a good steward of that. When I am, God is glorified—and I am fulfilled.

  • http://www.realityunblurred.blogspot.com/ Scoti Domeij

    When I write from my core passions, I tend to write edgy and honestly about the elephant in the room. In the past, I've been made to feel like something is wrong with me or I'm not on the same spiritual (aka pet theological) page others are. Recently, I posted something so honest, it scared me to say it out loud. Thinking I'd be rejected, instead, readers related. I was surprised and relieved. I eliminated one big obstacle for me—working for Christian organizations—so I could have more freedom to write from my heart.

    I'm reviewing a book for another publisher I respect. The obvious nonthinking, poor organization, Christianese, inability to explain their theological reasoning, and elementary writing skills actually angered me. I even spent eight hours researching the theological foundation, thinking I needed more background to understand how they connected their theology to the book's value statements.

    I keep wondering, "Where was their editor in the process?” The authors' thought provoking core idea intrigued me, but someone failed to push the authors to think deeper and write better. I cannot imagine how the authors got the book deal other than their platform. And I keep wondering, "Who would want to read this excruciating book?" It's soooooo blah, blah, blah that I'm embarrassed to write an honest review, because I fear it would be perceived as scathing. The book reads like a first draft submitted to my writing critique group. I keep yearning to read one aha moment in this book. Even the cover is blah.

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/patriciazell patriciazell

      Right on, Scott! Sometimes the lack of reasoning in our Christian faith astounds me. One would think that the God who said, "Come, let us reason together…" would be logical in His dealings with the human race. Yet, to listen to many Christians, God appears to be a capricious despot who can do what He wants to do when He wants to do it. Oh, and by the way, He loves us but sometimes He allows bad things to happen to us for His own mysterious ways. We'll understand it all when we all get to Heaven.

      I believe that one of the biggest reasons for this lack of reasoning out what we believe is that many people find the Bible intimidating, so they rely on what other people say about it. Unfortunately, we have ended up with the confusion like that of the childhood game we call "Telephone." I know I am asking God to help us all break through the confusion and find the logic of who He is, of who we are, and of how good will triumph over evil through what Jesus accomplished on the cross and through the power of the Holy Spirit.

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      Mediocrity is like a rip tide. You hardly know you are caught in one until it is too late. It takes awareness, courage, and a lot of hard work to swim against the current. Most people aren't willing to make the investment. That should be good news to the rest of us, because it makes it easier to stand out. ;-)

  • http://www.realityunblurred.blogspot.com Scoti Domeij

    When I write from my core passions, I tend to write edgy and honestly about the elephant in the room. In the past, I've been made to feel like something is wrong with me or I'm not on the same spiritual (aka pet theological) page others are. Recently, I posted something so honest, it scared me to say it out loud. Thinking I'd be rejected, instead, readers related. I was surprised and relieved. I eliminated one big obstacle for me—working for Christian organizations—so I could have more freedom to write from my heart.

    I'm reviewing a book for another publisher I respect. The obvious nonthinking, poor organization, Christianese, inability to explain their theological reasoning, and elementary writing skills actually angered me. I even spent eight hours researching the theological foundation, thinking I needed more background to understand how they connected their theology to the book's value statements.

    I keep wondering, "Where was their editor in the process?” The authors' thought provoking core idea intrigued me, but someone failed to push the authors to think deeper and write better. I cannot imagine how the authors got the book deal other than their platform. And I keep wondering, "Who would want to read this excruciating book?" It's soooooo blah, blah, blah that I'm embarrassed to write an honest review, because I fear it would be perceived as scathing. The book reads like a first draft submitted to my writing critique group. I keep yearning to read one aha moment in this book. Even the cover is blah.

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/patriciazell patriciazell

      Right on, Scott! Sometimes the lack of reasoning in our Christian faith astounds me. One would think that the God who said, "Come, let us reason together…" would be logical in His dealings with the human race. Yet, to listen to many Christians, God appears to be a capricious despot who can do what He wants to do when He wants to do it. Oh, and by the way, He loves us but sometimes He allows bad things to happen to us for His own mysterious ways. We'll understand it all when we all get to Heaven.

      I believe that one of the biggest reasons for this lack of reasoning out what we believe is that many people find the Bible intimidating, so they rely on what other people say about it. Unfortunately, we have ended up with the confusion like that of the childhood game we call "Telephone." I know I am asking God to help us all break through the confusion and find the logic of who He is, of who we are, and of how good will triumph over evil through what Jesus accomplished on the cross and through the power of the Holy Spirit.

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      Mediocrity is like a rip tide. You hardly know you are caught in one until it is too late. It takes awareness, courage, and a lot of hard work to swim against the current. Most people aren't willing to make the investment. That should be good news to the rest of us, because it makes it easier to stand out. ;-)

  • http://www.flurrycreations.com/theblog John

    Mike, Yes, Courage I believe is the root of our obstacles. People either live beyond their glory out of ego, or under their glory. The latter I think is a result of fear, wanting approval of others as well as not believing we have what it takes. I recently got a chance to rub shoulders with 17 men leading in remarkable ways around the country. Each of them was delivering a wow experience in some shape or form. In our time together, each man realized that he was not living up to the full potential or ”glory” that God had given him. To witness each man believing a little more, that he had the ability to do the extraordinary, was wonderful and inspirational to me. We each have that something great inside us. Paul stated this boldly and humbly in 2 Corinthians 10:13 “We however, will not boast beyond proper limits, but will confine our boasting to the field God has assigned to us”
    I am looking forward to the next post!

    Rachel. Yes! Good words too.
    @johnflurry

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      I like the term "glory." For me, it is all about becoming the person God created me to be. I need to be a good steward of that. When I am, God is glorified—and I am fulfilled.

  • http://blog.drikedc.com/ Dr. Ike

    I think it's all five for me, though I feel a bit that I just don't know where to start. I feel like I have a message, I feel like I could help a lot of people with it. In the end, courage is what I'm digging deep for in taking the first step.

    Thanks for posting items like this, it really guides me in a lot of ways and reminds me I'm capable of a lot more than I used to think.

    @DrIkeDC

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      Good for you. You are absolutely capable of more than you think! Hang in there.

  • http://blog.drikedc.com Dr. Ike

    I think it's all five for me, though I feel a bit that I just don't know where to start. I feel like I have a message, I feel like I could help a lot of people with it. In the end, courage is what I'm digging deep for in taking the first step.

    Thanks for posting items like this, it really guides me in a lot of ways and reminds me I'm capable of a lot more than I used to think.

    @DrIkeDC

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      Good for you. You are absolutely capable of more than you think! Hang in there.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/JeffHolton Jeffrey Holton

    Thanks for this, Mike.

    My obstacle is time. If I had unlimited time, it'd be no problem to challenge myself to the next level. But now that I'm living paycheck-to-paycheck (or worse, no paycheck) and with a family to support, I feel like the risk of investment of time only to abandon a half-baked project later is not just a setback, but is destruction.

    I feel like I have one shot, but can't decide yet which bullet to load. It's frustrating–to put it mildly–to be full of interesting ideas but to be convinced that trying to implement any of them could be the last great thing that I attempt.

    I don't *think* my obstacle is fear of failure, per se. If I had infinite time, failing repeatedly would be alright so long as I also had something successful brewing simultaneously.

    Your lead-in to tomorrow's post is lovely. I am so looking forward to it. I need inspiration.

    Or courage. I suppose there's a difference, maybe. But either would do right now.

    As Tony Campolo would say, Sunday's a-comin'.

    @jeffholton

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      I'll say this in more depth tomorrow, but follow your intuition. It's the map to buried treasure.

    • http://www.intensedebate.com/people/patriciazell patriciazell

      Hi, Jeff!

      First, I know how it feels to live paycheck to paycheck and to have to support a family. I also know how frustrating it can be to have all kinds of ideas roaming around in one's head. I do have a suggestion though that might help you decide which bullet to load. Make brief–and I mean brief–outlines of what you would write about for your ideas. Once you have a batch, read through them and just keep the ones you feel passion for. Do this as many times as you need and gradually narrow your field of ideas down. Next, take a week or two and write journal entries for the remaining ideas. Then pick the one that draws you the most. The advantages of this approach include you are actually doing something to move forward, you should not have a lot of time involved, and your thoughts will be clarified. I'll be praying for you!

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/JeffHolton Jeffrey Holton

    Thanks for this, Mike.

    My obstacle is time. If I had unlimited time, it'd be no problem to challenge myself to the next level. But now that I'm living paycheck-to-paycheck (or worse, no paycheck) and with a family to support, I feel like the risk of investment of time only to abandon a half-baked project later is not just a setback, but is destruction.

    I feel like I have one shot, but can't decide yet which bullet to load. It's frustrating–to put it mildly–to be full of interesting ideas but to be convinced that trying to implement any of them could be the last great thing that I attempt.

    I don't *think* my obstacle is fear of failure, per se. If I had infinite time, failing repeatedly would be alright so long as I also had something successful brewing simultaneously.

    Your lead-in to tomorrow's post is lovely. I am so looking forward to it. I need inspiration.

    Or courage. I suppose there's a difference, maybe. But either would do right now.

    As Tony Campolo would say, Sunday's a-comin'.

    @jeffholton

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      I'll say this in more depth tomorrow, but follow your intuition. It's the map to buried treasure.

    • http://www.intensedebate.com/people/patriciazell patriciazell

      Hi, Jeff!

      First, I know how it feels to live paycheck to paycheck and to have to support a family. I also know how frustrating it can be to have all kinds of ideas roaming around in one's head. I do have a suggestion though that might help you decide which bullet to load. Make brief–and I mean brief–outlines of what you would write about for your ideas. Once you have a batch, read through them and just keep the ones you feel passion for. Do this as many times as you need and gradually narrow your field of ideas down. Next, take a week or two and write journal entries for the remaining ideas. Then pick the one that draws you the most. The advantages of this approach include you are actually doing something to move forward, you should not have a lot of time involved, and your thoughts will be clarified. I'll be praying for you!

  • http://rickmorganconsulting.com/ Rick Morgan

    Totally agree – courage to fail, courage to be different, courage to take a chance – without that – mundane, average and "safe" results are produced.

  • http://rickmorganconsulting.com/ Rick Morgan

    Totally agree – courage to fail, courage to be different, courage to take a chance – without that – mundane, average and "safe" results are produced.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/ginnymartyn ginnymartyn

    Ah, the courage factor is very Who Moved My Cheese-ish. The best question that leapt out of that book and put a strangle hold on me was, “What would I do if I weren’t afraid?” Personally, I would do a whole lot more; like post on this site and hope that others won’t think I’m wack-a-doodle for doing so. Thanks for the post.

    http://thoughtthinkers.wordpress.com

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      I didn't remember it coming from that book. My daughter, Megan, often asks, "What would I do if I were brave?" It's the same question with slightly different words. Regardless, it is a powerful question.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/ginnymartyn ginnymartyn

    Ah, the courage factor is very Who Moved My Cheese-ish. The best question that leapt out of that book and put a strangle hold on me was, “What would I do if I weren’t afraid?” Personally, I would do a whole lot more; like post on this site and hope that others won’t think I’m wack-a-doodle for doing so. Thanks for the post.

    http://thoughtthinkers.wordpress.com

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      I didn't remember it coming from that book. My daughter, Megan, often asks, "What would I do if I were brave?" It's the same question with slightly different words. Regardless, it is a powerful question.

  • http://www.higherlevelgroup.com/danieldecker.html Daniel Decker

    Wow. (You just created it). :) Seriously, great post. The 5 points do a great job of articulating what many of us struggle with.

    I think WOW comes by speaking truth, being bold with passion, and not compromising what you know is right. WOW also comes by knowing who it is you are trying to create WOW for (by voice, experience, message, etc). WOW for me might look different than WOW for someone else.

    I think WOW also comes by NOT doing things out of obligation, rather doing them out of passion. A book, for example, that is just being written to fulfill a deal but is not a passion or something compelling to the author will often show as mediocre in the end.

    The approval issue is huge too. So much easier to join the crowd rather than to stand out by standing up. Standing up is risky but I’ve always heard that were there is no risk, there is no gain. :)

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      Yes, when we can connect our work with our passion, we have the potential to create WOW experiences for everyone.

    • http://building-his-body.blogspot.com/ Anne Lang Bundy

      I thoroughly agree that passion drives WOW (see my comment below). The source (or Source) of the passion is key.

  • http://www.higherlevelgroup.com/danieldecker.html Daniel Decker

    Wow. (You just created it). :) Seriously, great post. The 5 points do a great job of articulating what many of us struggle with.

    I think WOW comes by speaking truth, being bold with passion, and not compromising what you know is right. WOW also comes by knowing who it is you are trying to create WOW for (by voice, experience, message, etc). WOW for me might look different than WOW for someone else.

    I think WOW also comes by NOT doing things out of obligation, rather doing them out of passion. A book, for example, that is just being written to fulfill a deal but is not a passion or something compelling to the author will often show as mediocre in the end.

    The approval issue is huge too. So much easier to join the crowd rather than to stand out by standing up. Standing up is risky but I’ve always heard that were there is no risk, there is no gain. :)

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      Yes, when we can connect our work with our passion, we have the potential to create WOW experiences for everyone.

    • http://building-his-body.blogspot.com/ Anne Lang Bundy

      I thoroughly agree that passion drives WOW (see my comment below). The source (or Source) of the passion is key.

  • http://www.proworks.com/blog Loyan

    I think faith gives us the courage to overcome obstacles to creating wow as you said. Faith that we are doing the right thing. Faith that there is a better way. Faith that it is all worth it.

    Thank you for sharing this post with us Michael.

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      In my view faith and courage are very related. It would be interesting to compare and contrast them. Hmmm. Now you have me thinking! Thanks.

      • http://www.proworks.com/blog Loyan

        "Hmmm. Now you have me thinking!"

        Awesome!

  • http://www.proworks.com/blog Loyan

    I think faith gives us the courage to overcome obstacles to creating wow as you said. Faith that we are doing the right thing. Faith that there is a better way. Faith that it is all worth it.

    Thank you for sharing this post with us Michael.

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      In my view faith and courage are very related. It would be interesting to compare and contrast them. Hmmm. Now you have me thinking! Thanks.

      • http://www.proworks.com/blog Loyan

        "Hmmm. Now you have me thinking!"

        Awesome!

  • http://www.suspensenovelist.blogspot.com/ Peg Brantley

    The committee thing. I've finally gotten to the point that if I have a little niggling whisper, I should pay attention, figure it out, then say something if it's going to make the writing better. After than, I can sit back because I've been honest and it's up to someone else to decide whether I'm off the wall, or they need to make some changes—even if courage is required.

    Inquiring minds want to know (and maybe you'll provide the answer tomorrow), were you brave in this instance, or practical?

  • http://www.suspensenovelist.blogspot.com Peg Brantley

    The committee thing. I've finally gotten to the point that if I have a little niggling whisper, I should pay attention, figure it out, then say something if it's going to make the writing better. After than, I can sit back because I've been honest and it's up to someone else to decide whether I'm off the wall, or they need to make some changes—even if courage is required.

    Inquiring minds want to know (and maybe you'll provide the answer tomorrow), were you brave in this instance, or practical?

  • http://www.marydemuth.com/ Mary E. DeMuth

    Just read this on Seth Godin's blog: http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2009/06/o… I think that's the crux. We settle.

    As one who reads a lot of pieces of potential books, I can attest that in that stage, there's often nothing new, very little fresh. That's why I bend over backwards for someone who has a fresh voice, something new and deep to say, something surprising (yet biblical).

    For those of you who aspire to be published, take Mr. Hyatt's encouragement to heart. Create something stunning, different, unique. And then be strong enough to go forward, not shrinking back.

  • http://www.marydemuth.com Mary E. DeMuth

    Just read this on Seth Godin's blog: http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2009/06/o… I think that's the crux. We settle.

    As one who reads a lot of pieces of potential books, I can attest that in that stage, there's often nothing new, very little fresh. That's why I bend over backwards for someone who has a fresh voice, something new and deep to say, something surprising (yet biblical).

    For those of you who aspire to be published, take Mr. Hyatt's encouragement to heart. Create something stunning, different, unique. And then be strong enough to go forward, not shrinking back.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/SabrinaAdams SabrinaAdams

    Great post Mike. As a Christian Publisher I have expereinced all of these things. But it is true what is lacking above all else is courage…the courage to pursue God's best. His perfect will. Even when it is going against the grain. Instead of accepting His second best or His permissive will. Thanks for sharing…

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/SabrinaAdams SabrinaAdams

    Great post Mike. As a Christian Publisher I have expereinced all of these things. But it is true what is lacking above all else is courage…the courage to pursue God's best. His perfect will. Even when it is going against the grain. Instead of accepting His second best or His permissive will. Thanks for sharing…

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/MichaelSGray MichaelSGray

    To be completely honest, fear is my biggest obstacle. Creating a WOW experience always means going out on a limb. If the intended WOW never comes to fruition, then you're left with a big-time flop — and visualizing that possible outcome can be paralyzing.

    What's important for me to remember is the thought that, if I never swing for the fences, I'll never get to enjoy the thrill of a home run.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/MichaelSGray MichaelSGray

    To be completely honest, fear is my biggest obstacle. Creating a WOW experience always means going out on a limb. If the intended WOW never comes to fruition, then you're left with a big-time flop — and visualizing that possible outcome can be paralyzing.

    What's important for me to remember is the thought that, if I never swing for the fences, I'll never get to enjoy the thrill of a home run.

  • http://www.intensedebate.com/people/DavidMurrow DavidMurrow

    Mike, you've missed the most important obstacle of all: many Christian books fail because the author has not heard something new from God. I agree with your editor: so many "Christian" books are full of the same-old-same-old stuff. I just roll my eyes and toss these books aside in frustration.

    My first book was a hit because it was groundbreaking in the marketplace. Its premise was so unique it had to have come from God. My second book was not nearly as successful because I was simply repackaging my first book for a female audience.

    I'm very excited about the book I've just submitted. Once again, it's something fresh from the Lord. I've read all the Christian books for men, and I've never seen anything like it. I hope my readers feel the same way.

    To summarize: there's no substitute for divine revelation.

  • http://www.intensedebate.com/people/DavidMurrow DavidMurrow

    Mike, you've missed the most important obstacle of all: many Christian books fail because the author has not heard something new from God. I agree with your editor: so many "Christian" books are full of the same-old-same-old stuff. I just roll my eyes and toss these books aside in frustration.

    My first book was a hit because it was groundbreaking in the marketplace. Its premise was so unique it had to have come from God. My second book was not nearly as successful because I was simply repackaging my first book for a female audience.

    I'm very excited about the book I've just submitted. Once again, it's something fresh from the Lord. I've read all the Christian books for men, and I've never seen anything like it. I hope my readers feel the same way.

    To summarize: there's no substitute for divine revelation.

  • Dee

    Michael, I have to disagree. Courage is not the main obstacle for most writers. It's a lack of open doors. You can have all the courage in the world, but if every door you knock on remains locked, what good is courage?

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      You can settle for closed doors. You can tell yourself that you just can't get them open. Or you can ask yourself, "What does this closed door make possible?" or even "What are people really saying to me?"

      You could use this to take your proposal to the next level. You could switch topics. Or you could self-publish. There are many ways to get the job done.

      My first book was rejected over 30 times, so I am speaking from experience. I don't wish to be unkind, but could it be that you are afraid of success?

    • http://www.suspensenovelist.blogspot.com/ Peg Brantley

      Dee, I think Michael's post was about publishers, not writers.

      • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

        Actually, it was about anything where you want to accomplish something that is wow. It applies to publishers, writers, event planners, customer service projects—just about anything.

  • Dee

    Michael, I have to disagree. Courage is not the main obstacle for most writers. It's a lack of open doors. You can have all the courage in the world, but if every door you knock on remains locked, what good is courage?

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      You can settle for closed doors. You can tell yourself that you just can't get them open. Or you can ask yourself, "What does this closed door make possible?" or even "What are people really saying to me?"

      You could use this to take your proposal to the next level. You could switch topics. Or you could self-publish. There are many ways to get the job done.

      My first book was rejected over 30 times, so I am speaking from experience. I don't wish to be unkind, but could it be that you are afraid of success?

    • http://www.suspensenovelist.blogspot.com/ Peg Brantley

      Dee, I think Michael's post was about publishers, not writers.

      • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

        Actually, it was about anything where you want to accomplish something that is wow. It applies to publishers, writers, event planners, customer service projects—just about anything.

  • John Young

    Mike for 20 years I've mostly enjoyed publicizing thru network radio your product and competitors. Frankly it's more than the economy or cultural attitude changes about books causing a down cycle in sales. The product has often failed to deliver expectations. Too many hardbacks should have been paperbacks. Too many paperbacks should have been magazine articles. I believe in our customers. We can't make them buy hype but we can't stop their enthusiasm whether it's The Shack or Richard Stearns terrific work. Not every author is to be a brand, nor even deserving of a multi title deal. We've made publishing more like show-biz with yearly title demands vs deep message points.

  • John Young

    Mike for 20 years I've mostly enjoyed publicizing thru network radio your product and competitors. Frankly it's more than the economy or cultural attitude changes about books causing a down cycle in sales. The product has often failed to deliver expectations. Too many hardbacks should have been paperbacks. Too many paperbacks should have been magazine articles. I believe in our customers. We can't make them buy hype but we can't stop their enthusiasm whether it's The Shack or Richard Stearns terrific work. Not every author is to be a brand, nor even deserving of a multi title deal. We've made publishing more like show-biz with yearly title demands vs deep message points.

  • http://www.yinkaolaito.com/ yinka olaito

    Michael thanks for this article, I think I will keep working on time, resources and fear.

  • http://www.yinkaolaito.com/ yinka olaito

    Michael thanks for this article, I think I will keep working on time, resources and fear.

  • DKT

    Do you think lack of courage is a bigger obstacle than the lack of truly great ideas? In my opinion, the purple cow is becoming increasingly more elusive. The courage to DO the crazy things, at least for our organization, has never been a challenge. Give us a truly unique idea, and we'll make it happen!

  • DKT

    Do you think lack of courage is a bigger obstacle than the lack of truly great ideas? In my opinion, the purple cow is becoming increasingly more elusive. The courage to DO the crazy things, at least for our organization, has never been a challenge. Give us a truly unique idea, and we'll make it happen!

  • http://building-his-body.blogspot.com/ Anne Lang Bundy

    As an author, the biggest obstacle comes down to how much of myself, my soul, I'll drive myself to expend.

    Walter Wellesley "Red" Smith says, "There's nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and open a vein." This is the kind of writing produces WOW, but it doesn't come cheap to the writer.

    Passion drives WOW, and I believe it comes from God.

  • http://building-his-body.blogspot.com/ Anne Lang Bundy

    As an author, the biggest obstacle comes down to how much of myself, my soul, I'll drive myself to expend.

    Walter Wellesley "Red" Smith says, "There's nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and open a vein." This is the kind of writing produces WOW, but it doesn't come cheap to the writer.

    Passion drives WOW, and I believe it comes from God.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/chownage Chownage

    Question for me is, what did you do with the book?

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      We have gone back to the author and with the message, "This is not ready for prime time."

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/chownage Chownage

    Question for me is, what did you do with the book?

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/michaelhyatt Michael Hyatt

      We have gone back to the author and with the message, "This is not ready for prime time."

  • http://www.intensedebate.com/people/makasha makasha

    This is relevant. I am at a crossroads where fear and the lack of resources prevent me from taking hold of my dream. It also provokes a spirit of procrastination which in turn causes my time to run out. Instead of doing what I love I play video games, watch tv or veg out.

    Because of this post, I've decided to implement the principles of a training module I created for administrative professionals – Manage Yourself, Not Your Time. I realize that in order for me to be taken seriously, I must apply my knowledge and beliefs to my life, my family, and my carreer.

    Thanks for the nudge.

  • http://www.intensedebate.com/people/makasha makasha

    This is relevant. I am at a crossroads where fear and the lack of resources prevent me from taking hold of my dream. It also provokes a spirit of procrastination which in turn causes my time to run out. Instead of doing what I love I play video games, watch tv or veg out.

    Because of this post, I've decided to implement the principles of a training module I created for administrative professionals – Manage Yourself, Not Your Time. I realize that in order for me to be taken seriously, I must apply my knowledge and beliefs to my life, my family, and my carreer.

    Thanks for the nudge.

  • http://www.ecoquestintl.com/jimhandi Jim Oberschmidt

    Yes, courage, it bears repeating, though time, resources, and the committee of they, are formidable opponents, one's "why" will inspire the fortitude if it is of sufficient mass and one will keep it in focus. To tomorrow, may it exceed all our expectations. Thank you Mike. jim

  • http://www.ecoquestintl.com/jimhandi Jim Oberschmidt

    Yes, courage, it bears repeating, though time, resources, and the committee of they, are formidable opponents, one's "why" will inspire the fortitude if it is of sufficient mass and one will keep it in focus. To tomorrow, may it exceed all our expectations. Thank you Mike. jim

  • http://www.scanmonkeys.com/ Brian J. Smith

    I think fear is a huge element in keeping us away from wow. As a young business owner, it is hard to have the experience that seasoned professionals have. We finally made a decision to step out and try an idea that had been floating around for a while. And it's working great.

    Our document scanning company is called Scan Monkeys and we had wanted to stop by potential clients' offices with some information about what we do. We were looking for a creative way to do get out our message. We finally mustered up enough courage to pass out bananas with our cards and some info. People love it and are setting up follow up appointments left and right.

  • http://www.scanmonkeys.com Brian J. Smith

    I think fear is a huge element in keeping us away from wow. As a young business owner, it is hard to have the experience that seasoned professionals have. We finally made a decision to step out and try an idea that had been floating around for a while. And it's working great.

    Our document scanning company is called Scan Monkeys and we had wanted to stop by potential clients' offices with some information about what we do. We were looking for a creative way to do get out our message. We finally mustered up enough courage to pass out bananas with our cards and some info. People love it and are setting up follow up appointments left and right.

  • http://leadercast.com/ alex

    My biggest thing is having the lack of time. The sad thing is, I know this, and I know that I can create more time for myself. Thanks for the post, and thanks for reminding me what areas of my life I need to improve to have more WOW experiences!

  • http://leadercast.com/ alex

    My biggest thing is having the lack of time. The sad thing is, I know this, and I know that I can create more time for myself. Thanks for the post, and thanks for reminding me what areas of my life I need to improve to have more WOW experiences!

  • http://www.nateagilmer.com/ Nathan Gilmer

    I relate to this post so much. I am a very social person and the thought of having people not like me or think I am crazy for pursing something passionately is very scary to me.
    Cant wait to read the next post.

  • http://www.nateagilmer.com Nathan Gilmer

    I relate to this post so much. I am a very social person and the thought of having people not like me or think I am crazy for pursing something passionately is very scary to me.
    Cant wait to read the next post.

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  • Femi Popoola

    Michael,you're right about fear.It's true that we can do a lot more if we are not afraid of anything.

  • Femi Popoola

    Michael,you're right about fear.It's true that we can do a lot more if we are not afraid of anything.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/rodlie rodlie

    so what ended up happening? i'm dying to find out with the author!

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/rodlie rodlie

    so what ended up happening? i'm dying to find out with the author!

  • Pauline

    As I read this the line from the Christian song popped into my head …'that lacks the courage to be free'… It takes courage to be different and boldness to step onto a new place, even if,as Christans, we know that we not in the situation alone.

  • Pauline

    As I read this the line from the Christian song popped into my head …'that lacks the courage to be free'… It takes courage to be different and boldness to step onto a new place, even if,as Christans, we know that we not in the situation alone.

  • http://www.MooreNovels.com/ A.C. Moore

    I don't know. I worked really hard to find and build on the Wow factor and I still can't get a agent / publisher to take me on. I went a head and self published. I'm selling and getting feedback and it is working. I don't know if its just not my time or is there something else. I recall one day going to a writing workshop and had the chance to listen to a panel of agents who were talking about what they like / don't like and I asked have any of you ever turned down an author and have that author find representation elsewhere and they are now doing well? One agent said yes and said she turned down Stephenie Meyer, author of the Twilight series. Is that a big mistake or what? Before I get too long and lose you, I'd like for you to check out my book's hook. but the best way is for you to see the 40 second trailer on youtube – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWqJdOXEU74. If that doesn't wow you, I am out of ammunition.

  • http://www.MooreNovels.com/ A.C. Moore

    I don't know. I worked really hard to find and build on the Wow factor and I still can't get a agent / publisher to take me on. I went a head and self published. I'm selling and getting feedback and it is working. I don't know if its just not my time or is there something else. I recall one day going to a writing workshop and had the chance to listen to a panel of agents who were talking about what they like / don't like and I asked have any of you ever turned down an author and have that author find representation elsewhere and they are now doing well? One agent said yes and said she turned down Stephenie Meyer, author of the Twilight series. Is that a big mistake or what? Before I get too long and lose you, I'd like for you to check out my book's hook. but the best way is for you to see the 40 second trailer on youtube – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWqJdOXEU74. If that doesn't wow you, I am out of ammunition.

  • Christina

    by any chance have you been reading Seth Godin? sounds similar. Great photo of you. I've never approached Thomas Nelson BECAUSE it's a same old same old…a tiny bit away from the remarkable, new Christian in the world. I haven't found a window to the soul of company that looks open to new, innovative and marketable Christian ideas. If there is one, and I've just missed it, my apologies. I would have sent my book long ago. Best and I am grateful to have found your blog. Excellent work, words and insights from you – I appreciate your blog immensely. Christina

  • http://twitter.com/ryshaffer @ryshaffer

    Great post. Think #5 is what inhibits people the most, because like you said we would find the time, resources etc., if we could overcome the fear. That's what it's all about though right ? Taking steps each day to beat that fear and produce something better than we have before. thanks

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  • http://twitter.com/2020VisionBook Joshua Hood

    The great danger is settling for less; being satisfied with ‘good enough’. Meet the deadline. Fill the gap. Survive the project. It takes extra work and effort; blood, sweat, and tears, to declare that “Good isn’t good enough!” and create the WOW.

    Joshua Hood
    2020visiononline.org

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