What Have You Been Putting Off?

I cleaned out my bedroom closet this morning. I’m not sure what got me started. But once I got going, I couldn’t stop. I literally got rid of half my stuff.

a clothes rack full of shirts neatly in a row

I can’t tell you how good I felt after clearing out all this clutter. With the recession, less is the new more.I completed the whole task in about an hour, using three criteria:

  1. Does it fit? I had clothes from a time when I was heavier—and thinner. I tossed both.
  2. Is it in style? I don’t buy clothes that are too trendy, but I still had stuff that I would be embarrassed to wear now. I swear, I had some clothes dating back to the Reagan administration.
  3. Is it in good repair? Some of my favorite sweaters were downright natty. A couple of my suits were worn or stretched out.

This was a good reminder that those tasks we keep putting off, don’t really take that long to accomplish. Getting started is the hard part.

Question: What have you been putting off that you just need to do? Extra credit: What should I do with all the clothes I need to toss: charity? consignment? eBay?
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  • http://www.withoutwax.tv Pete Wilson

    Great points. I literally just finished cleaning out my closet this morning. I’ve got four bags to take to Goodwill.

    The question I kept asking is “Do I?” verse “Can I?”.

    There were several things that I could wear but the reality is I don’t therefore it’s time to throw them out.

  • http://www.colleencoble.com Colleen Coble

    I do this periodically and take it all to Goodwill. eBay takes too much effort!

    I’ve been putting off getting new bedroom furniture, mostly because it will entail dragging Dave kicking and screaming to the store. But really, I should contribute to the economy, don’t you think??

  • http://rcwriter.wordpress.com Rhonda Clark

    We’ve been cleaning out our house. It’s amazing the amount of useless toys my kids have accumulated. I’m planning on having a Spring yard sale to pay for a vacation. Did the same thing last Spring and had a great start to the vacation fund. Chatterbox’s clothes usually go the the consignment sale at the church. If Soccerboy’s are wearable, they go to the yard sale, otherwise they are only fit for the trash. Everything that’s left over, I’m hoping to send to charity. 90% of the stuff that goes out WILL NOT come back in. :)

  • http://www.omarhamada.blogspot.com Omar Hamada

    Michael,

    My wife and I did this last month. We took most to ThriftSmart benefitting Mercy Children’s Clinic. Dick Gygi convinced us that this is a tremendous ministry that doesn’t just resell, but donates all proceeds to worthy charities.

    Tara’s going to Ebay a few select items.

  • LynnK

    Funny timing, as I went on a massive shoe cleaning-out rampage this morning. How did I accumulate so many pairs of shoes?! I have more on my list, once the dead of winter sets in: LOTS of technical outdoor wear, too many off-road motorcycle spares cluttering my basement and a shameful amount of clothing collected over the last 10 or 15 years.

    Some will go on ebay; some will go to local charities, like this morning’s shoe collection. One indeed has to wonder whether the recent pause in economic growth (and downdraft in retirement savings) will trigger a meaningful change in consumption habits. I reflect back on what my depression-era parents always preached: live below your means, save and make do with what you have. The new boomer mantra?

  • http://www.withoutwax.tv/ Pete Wilson

    Great points. I literally just finished cleaning out my closet this morning. I've got four bags to take to Goodwill.

    The question I kept asking is "Do I?" verse "Can I?".

    There were several things that I could wear but the reality is I don't therefore it's time to throw them out.

  • http://www.colleencoble.com/ Colleen Coble

    I do this periodically and take it all to Goodwill. eBay takes too much effort!

    I've been putting off getting new bedroom furniture, mostly because it will entail dragging Dave kicking and screaming to the store. But really, I should contribute to the economy, don't you think??

  • LynnK

    Oh shoot, I just saw the “extra credit” question. I’ve done a LOT of ebay transactions over the years and given a lot of really nice stuff to charity as well. Here’s how I look at it.

    1. ebay: Best for designer brands that folks will be searching for. Forget about listing generic-branded items; the amount you make won’t be worth your time and effort. Also, stick with items that will have a high enough selling price to justify your effort.

    2. Everything else goes to charity. I’m careful with charities, though, because some charities end up putting donated items in their retail stores for sale. What irks me is that some ebay sellers frequent these stores, load up on merchandise (especially any designer labels) then resell the items on ebay for a profit. While the charitable establishment indeed accomplishes its objective of making money on the donations, it just bothers me personally that someone else is profiting from a donation. I prefer to find local charities that actually distribute donated clothing directly to the needy.

  • http://postsome-readmore.blogspot.com/ Robbie Wendt

    It’s amazing you posted this today! I’ve been putting off closet cleaning for months. Finally did it this morning.

    We take our clothes to the local rescue mission. Thanks for the blog!

  • http://rcwriter.wordpress.com/ Rhonda Clark

    We've been cleaning out our house. It's amazing the amount of useless toys my kids have accumulated. I'm planning on having a Spring yard sale to pay for a vacation. Did the same thing last Spring and had a great start to the vacation fund. Chatterbox's clothes usually go the the consignment sale at the church. If Soccerboy's are wearable, they go to the yard sale, otherwise they are only fit for the trash. Everything that's left over, I'm hoping to send to charity. 90% of the stuff that goes out WILL NOT come back in. :)

  • http://www.omarhamada.blogspot.com/ Omar Hamada

    Michael,

    My wife and I did this last month. We took most to ThriftSmart benefitting Mercy Children's Clinic. Dick Gygi convinced us that this is a tremendous ministry that doesn't just resell, but donates all proceeds to worthy charities.

    Tara's going to Ebay a few select items.

  • Matt

    There are plenty of good ways to donate the excess that we build up … one that I have become aware of recently (for shoes) is:

    http://www.soles4souls.org/

    The “natty” may be best thrown out, but the rest (too big, too small, not trendy enough, etc.) will likely make someone else’s life better.

  • http://crustygasguy.blogspot.com Alan

    I just love cleaning out closets. It kind of feeds on itself once I get going. It feels great to get rid of stuff. We are always getting calls from outfits like the Salvation Army. We let them have it.

  • LynnK

    Funny timing, as I went on a massive shoe cleaning-out rampage this morning. How did I accumulate so many pairs of shoes?! I have more on my list, once the dead of winter sets in: LOTS of technical outdoor wear, too many off-road motorcycle spares cluttering my basement and a shameful amount of clothing collected over the last 10 or 15 years.

    Some will go on ebay; some will go to local charities, like this morning's shoe collection. One indeed has to wonder whether the recent pause in economic growth (and downdraft in retirement savings) will trigger a meaningful change in consumption habits. I reflect back on what my depression-era parents always preached: live below your means, save and make do with what you have. The new boomer mantra?

  • LynnK

    Oh shoot, I just saw the "extra credit" question. I've done a LOT of ebay transactions over the years and given a lot of really nice stuff to charity as well. Here's how I look at it.

    1. ebay: Best for designer brands that folks will be searching for. Forget about listing generic-branded items; the amount you make won't be worth your time and effort. Also, stick with items that will have a high enough selling price to justify your effort.

    2. Everything else goes to charity. I'm careful with charities, though, because some charities end up putting donated items in their retail stores for sale. What irks me is that some ebay sellers frequent these stores, load up on merchandise (especially any designer labels) then resell the items on ebay for a profit. While the charitable establishment indeed accomplishes its objective of making money on the donations, it just bothers me personally that someone else is profiting from a donation. I prefer to find local charities that actually distribute donated clothing directly to the needy.

  • http://postsome-readmore.blogspot.com/ Robbie Wendt

    It's amazing you posted this today! I've been putting off closet cleaning for months. Finally did it this morning.

    We take our clothes to the local rescue mission. Thanks for the blog!

  • http://www.glassroadpr.com Rebeca Seitz

    I FINALLY got my inbox cleaned out again today. It took nearly the entire day to wade through all the emails that had accumulated while I was on maternity leave, but I did it! I LOVE seeing a big white screen for my inbox – well, until the email pops up with Mike Hyatt’s new blog entry. :)

  • http://www.heartchoices.com Debbie

    Did you really have to post this one now? Only kidding but I’ve been putting this off now for some time. I really need to pull out my winter clothes and put away the summer. Living in Phoenix though, it’s not as urgent since the temperatures are still in the 70′s. But this is definitely something I still need to do. Well maybe I just might get going now.

  • http://www.mosaictrust.com DBell

    I agree with one comment – ThriftSmart. There is no better leveraged give-away than to ThriftSmart. You get all the same great pros as a Goodwill plus the distribution of profits back to great ministries. Here is their web site: http://www.gothriftingnashville.com/index.html

  • http://www.michaelhyatt.com Michael S. Hyatt

    @Omar and @DBell: I’m definitely going to check out ThriftSmart.

  • Matt

    There are plenty of good ways to donate the excess that we build up … one that I have become aware of recently (for shoes) is:
    http://www.soles4souls.org/

    The "natty" may be best thrown out, but the rest (too big, too small, not trendy enough, etc.) will likely make someone else's life better.

  • http://crustygasguy.blogspot.com/ Alan

    I just love cleaning out closets. It kind of feeds on itself once I get going. It feels great to get rid of stuff. We are always getting calls from outfits like the Salvation Army. We let them have it.

  • http://www.glassroadpr.com/ Rebeca Seitz

    I FINALLY got my inbox cleaned out again today. It took nearly the entire day to wade through all the emails that had accumulated while I was on maternity leave, but I did it! I LOVE seeing a big white screen for my inbox – well, until the email pops up with Mike Hyatt's new blog entry. :)

  • http://www.heartchoices.com/ Debbie

    Did you really have to post this one now? Only kidding but I've been putting this off now for some time. I really need to pull out my winter clothes and put away the summer. Living in Phoenix though, it's not as urgent since the temperatures are still in the 70's. But this is definitely something I still need to do. Well maybe I just might get going now.

  • http://cherylbarker.blogspot.com/ Cheryl Barker

    Ministries to the homeless usually welcome clothing donations. Many times they need dress shirts, jackets, slacks, etc. for those who may have job interviews and no appropriate clothing to wear to them. With winter coming, I’m sure the need for warm clothing is great.

  • http://www.mosaictrust.com/ DBell

    I agree with one comment – ThriftSmart. There is no better leveraged give-away than to ThriftSmart. You get all the same great pros as a Goodwill plus the distribution of profits back to great ministries. Here is their web site: http://www.gothriftingnashville.com/index.html

  • http://www.michaelhyatt.com/ Michael S. Hyatt

    @Omar and @DBell: I'm definitely going to check out ThriftSmart.

  • http://www.courageoussingleparenting.blogspot.com Scoti Springfield Domeij

    Arrggghhh! You stabbed me in my heart. For the last two days, I’ve put off going through my closet and every drawer in my bedroom. I no longer give to Goodwill, because not enough of the money goes to the disabled. Too much goes to high executive salaries. I give my clothes to TESSA, an organization that helps women trying to escape domestic abuse. They need the clothes for job interviews.

  • http://cherylbarker.blogspot.com/ Cheryl Barker

    Ministries to the homeless usually welcome clothing donations. Many times they need dress shirts, jackets, slacks, etc. for those who may have job interviews and no appropriate clothing to wear to them. With winter coming, I'm sure the need for warm clothing is great.

  • http://www.linda-adams.com Linda

    – What should I do with all the clothes I need to toss: charity? consignment? eBay? –

    I don’t know if they have something similar for men, but I periodically run into a charity that takes women’s suits. They give them to women who are trying to get a better job and educate them on how to do interviews.

    For me personally, when I did my clean up–I thought my apartment building was going to close a couple of years ago–everything went to Goodwill or in the trash. Ebay was just too much time and effort when all I wanted to do was get rid of stuff. Ebay means it hangs around longer.

  • http://www.courageoussingleparenting.blogspot.com/ Scoti Springfield Do

    Arrggghhh! You stabbed me in my heart. For the last two days, I've put off going through my closet and every drawer in my bedroom. I no longer give to Goodwill, because not enough of the money goes to the disabled. Too much goes to high executive salaries. I give my clothes to TESSA, an organization that helps women trying to escape domestic abuse. They need the clothes for job interviews.

  • http://www.linda-adams.com/ Linda

    – What should I do with all the clothes I need to toss: charity? consignment? eBay? —

    I don't know if they have something similar for men, but I periodically run into a charity that takes women's suits. They give them to women who are trying to get a better job and educate them on how to do interviews.

    For me personally, when I did my clean up–I thought my apartment building was going to close a couple of years ago–everything went to Goodwill or in the trash. Ebay was just too much time and effort when all I wanted to do was get rid of stuff. Ebay means it hangs around longer.

  • Jack

    My vote is for donating your stuff to the Nashville Rescue Mission.

  • Jack

    My vote is for donating your stuff to the Nashville Rescue Mission.

  • http://marc.rohde-net.us Marc Rohde

    I agree with most of the other, donations are the way to go regardless of the cause. Unless your closet is full of unused or expensive clothing it is rarely worth the effort for eBay.

    Take a tax break from the donation, get it out of the house, and get it in the hands of somebody who can use it.

  • http://www.thriftsmart.com Dick Gygi

    Omar and DBell, thanks for your comments about ThriftSmart. ThriftSmart exists to provide value to customers,opportunity for employees, and benefit to charities by operating the best thrift stores in the world and promoting thrifty living – all for God’s glory. Why do we do this? Because it’s smart to SAVE, right to GIVE, and it makes you SMILE, because as Michael discovered, by cleaning out the closet and givng to others it makes you feel good. ThriftSmart gives 100% of its profit to its supported charities.

    I was reading in todays Wall Street Journal (Sat., November 15, 2008)an article, “Memories of the Depression Still Soar.” Here is a quote from Larry Womble growing up in the Great Depression,”Being frugal was a cardinal value, as was avoiding excess. But so was sharing with those who had even less.”

    Michael, you are so right, “with the recession, less is the new more.” Believe it, and visit us at 4890 Nolensville Road in Nashville or email me and I will give you a personal tour.

    Recently, a young woman visiting with us from out of town, beamed as she left the store. When I enquired about her exuberance, she smiled and showed me the brand new Rock & Republic brand designer jeans she had bought with the tags still on them for $14.99. When we got home she took me to their website to show me the on-line retail price for the exact jeans: $277.00!!

    So, the point is that it’s smart to be thrifty!

    For Debbie from Phoenix, we also have a ThriftSmart store in Phoenix at 13621 N. 32nd St. at the southeast corner of 32nd St. and Thunderbird. You can take your donations to the store or call them and they will pick them up at your home just like we will in Nashville.

    Michael is right:Save.Give.Smile.

  • Anonymous

    I agree with most of the other, donations are the way to go regardless of the cause. Unless your closet is full of unused or expensive clothing it is rarely worth the effort for eBay.

    Take a tax break from the donation, get it out of the house, and get it in the hands of somebody who can use it.

  • http://www.thriftsmart.com/ Dick Gygi

    Omar and DBell, thanks for your comments about ThriftSmart. ThriftSmart exists to provide value to customers,opportunity for employees, and benefit to charities by operating the best thrift stores in the world and promoting thrifty living – all for God's glory. Why do we do this? Because it's smart to SAVE, right to GIVE, and it makes you SMILE, because as Michael discovered, by cleaning out the closet and givng to others it makes you feel good. ThriftSmart gives 100% of its profit to its supported charities.

    I was reading in todays Wall Street Journal (Sat., November 15, 2008)an article, "Memories of the Depression Still Soar." Here is a quote from Larry Womble growing up in the Great Depression,"Being frugal was a cardinal value, as was avoiding excess. But so was sharing with those who had even less."

    Michael, you are so right, "with the recession, less is the new more." Believe it, and visit us at 4890 Nolensville Road in Nashville or email me and I will give you a personal tour.

    Recently, a young woman visiting with us from out of town, beamed as she left the store. When I enquired about her exuberance, she smiled and showed me the brand new Rock & Republic brand designer jeans she had bought with the tags still on them for $14.99. When we got home she took me to their website to show me the on-line retail price for the exact jeans: $277.00!!

    So, the point is that it's smart to be thrifty!

    For Debbie from Phoenix, we also have a ThriftSmart store in Phoenix at 13621 N. 32nd St. at the southeast corner of 32nd St. and Thunderbird. You can take your donations to the store or call them and they will pick them up at your home just like we will in Nashville.

    Michael is right:Save.Give.Smile.

  • http://silentmornings.blogspot.com Liza

    Tip: When you hang your seasonal clothes in the closet, turn all the hangers backwards. If you wear something, turn the hanger forward. In 6 mos. the hangers that aren’t turned forward, take those out of your closet and repurpose.

  • http://silentmornings.blogspot.com/ Liza

    Tip: When you hang your seasonal clothes in the closet, turn all the hangers backwards. If you wear something, turn the hanger forward. In 6 mos. the hangers that aren't turned forward, take those out of your closet and repurpose.

  • http://xiaofenwang.blogspot.com Mary Wang

    Above three criteria you mentioned for clearing out the closet is really very reasonable.
    1-Does it fit?
    2-Is it in style?
    3-Is it in good repair?

    How to do with all the clothes what i need to toss? as for me,I have never give to consignment sale or on ebay before ,only give some to the charity once.Most of the time ,I give the clothes to my sister who is 8 years youger than me,but after all,i don’t think it is a good way to deal with the clothes ,because it is not fit and in style for her.
    It’s also too much bother giving to the charity by ourselves unless this activity is organized by company.
    I have no idea about it as well.

  • http://xiaofenwang.blogspot.com/ Mary Wang

    Above three criteria you mentioned for clearing out the closet is really very reasonable.
    1-Does it fit?
    2-Is it in style?
    3-Is it in good repair?

    How to do with all the clothes what i need to toss? as for me,I have never give to consignment sale or on ebay before ,only give some to the charity once.Most of the time ,I give the clothes to my sister who is 8 years youger than me,but after all,i don't think it is a good way to deal with the clothes ,because it is not fit and in style for her.
    It's also too much bother giving to the charity by ourselves unless this activity is organized by company.
    I have no idea about it as well.

  • David in Nashville

    Michael, this inspires me to comment on what I learned years ago.
    “Why just give to Goodwill?”
    Why not “Give to great ministries?”
    It’s an attitude of “Giving for Living”.
    Check out where these “gifts” are going.
    “One man’s junk is another man’s treasure” NO!!!
    “One man’s treasure is another man’s LIFE.”
    You worked hard for these “treasures” and their lives seem to have run their course for you, but there IS still life left in each.
    Give and keep another Living.
    This attitude is what will make you Smile when you Give.

  • David in Nashville

    Michael, this inspires me to comment on what I learned years ago.
    "Why just give to Goodwill?"
    Why not "Give to great ministries?"
    It's an attitude of "Giving for Living".
    Check out where these "gifts" are going.
    "One man's junk is another man's treasure" NO!!!
    "One man's treasure is another man's LIFE."
    You worked hard for these "treasures" and their lives seem to have run their course for you, but there IS still life left in each.
    Give and keep another Living.
    This attitude is what will make you Smile when you Give.

  • Tod Shuttleworth

    Mike -

    Know the feeling. Last week I FINALLY took down 10 dead trees from last year’s drought and split the good parts into firewood. Great to finally get them out of the yard.

  • claudio

    Thank you Michael to invite me to take an action! Mee to I used only one hour but I had a look also to shirts and pullover.

  • Tod Shuttleworth

    Mike –

    Know the feeling. Last week I FINALLY took down 10 dead trees from last year's drought and split the good parts into firewood. Great to finally get them out of the yard.

  • claudio

    Thank you Michael to invite me to take an action! Mee to I used only one hour but I had a look also to shirts and pullover.

  • H.J. Keene

    When the downsizing mood creates the question of “What to do with all this stuff?” remember the outreach of the Salvation Army. It is always ready, always the first to reach disaster areas, and has a long list of many well-run programs for children, the abused, the addicted, etc. It responds to a phone call and will pick up your giveaways.

  • H.J. Keene

    When the downsizing mood creates the question of "What to do with all this stuff?" remember the outreach of the Salvation Army. It is always ready, always the first to reach disaster areas, and has a long list of many well-run programs for children, the abused, the addicted, etc. It responds to a phone call and will pick up your giveaways.

  • http://www.kimmirich.wordpress.com Kimmi

    Michael, nice post. 13 Thursdays, a plan I came up with years ago for my family. Basically it’s all about ‘simplifying.’

    Each member of my househould must bring me 13 objects every
    Wednesday, things such as their ‘toys,’ clothing etc… items which they no longer use, preferably their ‘wants’ not ‘needs’. No whining allowed. It is then separated into two piles, donations and trash, then donated or put out to trash Thursday morning.

  • http://www.kimmirich.wordpress.com/ Kimmi

    Michael, nice post. 13 Thursdays, a plan I came up with years ago for my family. Basically it’s all about ‘simplifying.’

    Each member of my househould must bring me 13 objects every
    Wednesday, things such as their ‘toys,’ clothing etc… items which they no longer use, preferably their ‘wants’ not ‘needs’. No whining allowed. It is then separated into two piles, donations and trash, then donated or put out to trash Thursday morning.

  • Nadine

    I now take all my clothes and those of my kids to the local women’s shelter. I get the tax write-off and women and children get clothes for free. Many times abused women leave home with their kids and just the clothes on their backs. Can you imagine having nothing at all and starting over? Remember the shelters. Thanks.

  • Nadine

    I now take all my clothes and those of my kids to the local women's shelter. I get the tax write-off and women and children get clothes for free. Many times abused women leave home with their kids and just the clothes on their backs. Can you imagine having nothing at all and starting over? Remember the shelters. Thanks.

  • Jake

    I once asked Salvation Army Thrift store what they did with the stuff that doesn’t sell. They said the useful items are shipped over seas to needy areas. So, that is one reason I donate there.

    I also donate to a shop called “Mission Thrift” that is run by a local church. Every one that works in the store is a volunteer from the church and the proceeds above the rent and utilities and insurance go to mission causes. The workers are all unpaid so the stuff can really be sold cheap. One time I invited a family on vacation to go to church with me. They said all they had with them were flip flops. So I took them to Mission Thrift and bought everyone in the family shoes for 50 cents a pair and we went to church.

    A store like that not only uses the money made from sales on kingdom causes, but also makes it easy for poor people to buy clothes. Children’s clothes go for .50-$1.00. Homeschooling moms get school books cheaply there, as well.

    My kids really like seeing their favorite clothes still walking around on someone else after they have outgrown them. (Me too). I once donated a shirt I had screen painted — a “one of a kind”. About a week later I saw it being worn by a homeless man. — That’s a category of a certain type of thrill all it’s own, but without a definition that I have ever heard —– except maybe the one mentioned in Mt. 25:40.

  • http://www.fabfav.carbonmade.com Jana

    I think you should sell the clothes on ebay and donate the money made to a local charity of your choice. I’ve noticed that the thrift shops are pretty pricy these days since “vintage” is in style. If you don’t have the time to do the ebay idea then I would look into finding a charity that supplies professional attire to men and women re-entering the workforce. If you do decide to donate to a thrift store I would choose a local ministry as they tend to struggle more often than others I saw one in Franklin called “the GEAR Foundation” they help the disabled find jobs and they have a thrift store! Blessings!

  • http://dietta.ru/ CoriEffob

    Просто восхитительно!

  • Jake

    I once asked Salvation Army Thrift store what they did with the stuff that doesn't sell. They said the useful items are shipped over seas to needy areas. So, that is one reason I donate there.

    I also donate to a shop called "Mission Thrift" that is run by a local church. Every one that works in the store is a volunteer from the church and the proceeds above the rent and utilities and insurance go to mission causes. The workers are all unpaid so the stuff can really be sold cheap. One time I invited a family on vacation to go to church with me. They said all they had with them were flip flops. So I took them to Mission Thrift and bought everyone in the family shoes for 50 cents a pair and we went to church.

    A store like that not only uses the money made from sales on kingdom causes, but also makes it easy for poor people to buy clothes. Children's clothes go for .50-$1.00. Homeschooling moms get school books cheaply there, as well.

    My kids really like seeing their favorite clothes still walking around on someone else after they have outgrown them. (Me too). I once donated a shirt I had screen painted — a "one of a kind". About a week later I saw it being worn by a homeless man. — That's a category of a certain type of thrill all it's own, but without a definition that I have ever heard —– except maybe the one mentioned in Mt. 25:40.

  • http://www.fabfav.carbonmade.com/ Jana

    I think you should sell the clothes on ebay and donate the money made to a local charity of your choice. I've noticed that the thrift shops are pretty pricy these days since "vintage" is in style. If you don't have the time to do the ebay idea then I would look into finding a charity that supplies professional attire to men and women re-entering the workforce. If you do decide to donate to a thrift store I would choose a local ministry as they tend to struggle more often than others I saw one in Franklin called "the GEAR Foundation" they help the disabled find jobs and they have a thrift store! Blessings!

  • http://dietta.ru/ CoriEffob

    Просто восхитительно!

  • http://www.lifebeyondsport.com Stephanie Zonars

    I agree with everyone who shared about Job Centers that help people who need appropriate clothes for interviews, jobs, etc. Also, if you’re looking to give away clothing for girls age 15-25, please consider Mercy Ministries (www.mercyministries.org) — some of the girls at Mercy come in right off the streets with only the clothes they’re wearing.

  • http://www.lifebeyondsport.com/ Stephanie Zonars

    I agree with everyone who shared about Job Centers that help people who need appropriate clothes for interviews, jobs, etc. Also, if you're looking to give away clothing for girls age 15-25, please consider Mercy Ministries (www.mercyministries.org) — some of the girls at Mercy come in right off the streets with only the clothes they're wearing.

  • http://randallbscott.com Randy

    I wish my wife would clean out her closet. She still has clothes from before we were married. A nice thing is that she can still fit them and we’ve been married 26 years!

  • http://randallbscott.com/ Randy

    I wish my wife would clean out her closet. She still has clothes from before we were married. A nice thing is that she can still fit them and we've been married 26 years!

  • http://na-dache.blogspot.com Matthew

    I’m willing to bet the casts offs from the closet of Thomas Nelson’s CEO could get another 10 years of good use on the back of some poor seminary student, for example. :-)

  • http://na-dache.blogspot.com/ Matthew

    I'm willing to bet the casts offs from the closet of Thomas Nelson's CEO could get another 10 years of good use on the back of some poor seminary student, for example. :-)

  • http://www.publishedauthors.net/robsargeant Rob Sargeant

    I just can’t give up my white polyester disco suit. I know it’s going to come back into style. I’m sure of it.

  • http://www.publishedauthors.net/robsargeant Rob Sargeant

    I just can't give up my white polyester disco suit. I know it's going to come back into style. I'm sure of it.

  • http://www.donnapartow.com Donna Partow

    I try to put the Law of Thermodynamics on my side whenever I can. (A body in motion tends to stay in motion.) The more I get done, the more energy is generated to tackle the next thing that must be done.

    Often the most exhausting thing of all is not what I get done, but what I leave undone. Those unfinished tasks haunt my quiet moments and drain the life from my soul. The ten pounds I want to lose or the disaster in the garage that I plan to organize some day. These things silently accuse and mentally exhaust me.

    Have you ever put something off for weeks, months or years, and it just bugged you. Then you finally did the stupid thing and it took you about 15 minutes. I’ve done that way too often. Then I’m left wondering: why did I put it off for so long? Why was I dreading that?

    Here’s an idea that works for me. I make a “Dread List” or “Bother List.” All the stuff I’ve been putting off because I dread doing it; all the things that bother me when I think about them.

    Then I start tackling them one by one. As I cross each one off the list, it generates energy to tackle another.

    Think I’m gonna take a walk around my house with my Blackberry in hand and make a Bother List for 2009. I’ve inspired myself :)

  • http://www.donnapartow.com/ Donna Partow

    I try to put the Law of Thermodynamics on my side whenever I can. (A body in motion tends to stay in motion.) The more I get done, the more energy is generated to tackle the next thing that must be done.

    Often the most exhausting thing of all is not what I get done, but what I leave undone. Those unfinished tasks haunt my quiet moments and drain the life from my soul. The ten pounds I want to lose or the disaster in the garage that I plan to organize some day. These things silently accuse and mentally exhaust me.

    Have you ever put something off for weeks, months or years, and it just bugged you. Then you finally did the stupid thing and it took you about 15 minutes. I've done that way too often. Then I'm left wondering: why did I put it off for so long? Why was I dreading that?

    Here's an idea that works for me. I make a "Dread List" or "Bother List." All the stuff I've been putting off because I dread doing it; all the things that bother me when I think about them.

    Then I start tackling them one by one. As I cross each one off the list, it generates energy to tackle another.

    Think I'm gonna take a walk around my house with my Blackberry in hand and make a Bother List for 2009. I've inspired myself :)

  • http://twitter.com/KristinBeck @KristinBeck

    We did this in our garage yesterday, and made $375 on Craigslist by selling things we didn't need. Granted, not much use for old clothes, but it works for most everything else.

  • http://twitter.com/KristinBeck @KristinBeck

    We did this in our garage yesterday, and made $375 on Craigslist by selling things we didn't need. Granted, not much use for old clothes, but it works for most everything else.