What Social Media Stats Should You Include in Your Book Proposal?

A few weeks ago, an author friend of mine was preparing a proposal for his new book. He called to ask me what social media stats he should include. In other words, what would be meaningful to prospective publishers? This is a great question.

Close-up of Graph - Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/Nikada, Image #6880980

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/Nikada

Agents and publishers are looking for authors with meaningful platforms. Most look at specific social media stats as a proxy for this. These stats include those specifically related to blogging, Facebook, and Twitter.

In order to get accurate blog stats, you should sign up for a free Google Analytics account. This is the “gold standard” when it comes to reporting web stats. You will need to refer to your blog’s documentation to figure out how to install it. It is relatively easy but different depending on the blogging system you are using and your configuration.

Here are six stats that most agents and publishers deem relevant.

  1. Unique visitors per month. This is the number of unique individuals who have visited your blog in the last 30 days. For example, one individual may visit your blog three times in one week. However, this would only count as one unique visitor. Note: RSS and email subscribers do not count toward your total. For a true count, you must add the number of subscribers you have to this monthly total.
  2. Page views per month. This is the number of pages your visitors have viewed in the last month. If you divide this number by your total unique visitors, you will get the average number of pages viewed by each visitor. While this number is important to publishers, you will find it is even more important to prospective advertisers on your blog. Why? Because they are basically buying the specific number of impressions their ad will get on your site.
  3. Percent change in the last 12 months. This is the rate of growth in the last 12 months. Publishers want to know if your audience is growing and at what rate. (It should be important to you, too.) Here’s the formula: unique visitors in the last 30 days, minus your unique visitors for the same period 12 months ago, divided by your unique visitors for the same period 12 months ago. multiplied by 100. For me, that would be 166,103 (unique visitors in May 2011), minus 54,326 (unique visitors in May 2010). divided by 54,326, multiplied by 100, equals 205.8% growth.
  4. Average number of comments per post. This is a little trickier, because not all commenting systems keep track of this stat. Disqus, the system I use (and highly recommend) provides an “analytics snapshot” that tells me how many comments I received today, last month, and all time. For example, last month I had 4,608 comments. If I divide that by 20 posts, that is an average of 230 comments per post. What this demonstrates is how engaged your audience is with your content. If you want, you can also include the average number of Tweets or Facebook Shares or Likes per post.
  5. Total number of blog subscribers. The people who subscribe via email or RSS represent your most loyal readers or “super-fans.” They have made the effort to sign-up to receive your content. More importantly, they have given you permission to push content to them. This permission-based asset is arguably the most important asset you have as an author. This is also why I have been on a campaign in the last three months to grow my subscriber list by giving away a free e-book.
  6. Total number of Twitter followers or Facebook fans. These are the two primary vehicles I use to drive get the word out about my new blogs posts. It is another permission-based asset that you bring to the publishing partnership. While the total number of followers can be important, I think it is more important to show how engaged they are. How many times have you been re-tweeted in the last 30 days? How many Facebook “likes” or “shares” have you had? If you really want to get fancy, track your Klout score. This is a measure of your influence with your audience.

Notice that I don’t mention “hits.” Expunge this word from your social media vocabulary. The term “hits” refers to the total number of requests your blog or website makes to the server. For example, if you have a page with numerous images on it, some javascript programs, and excerpts from a dozen posts, you might have 20–50 “hits” per page load. This number is irrelevant—at least as far as traffic goes. If you cite it, it will only mark you out as a newbie.

There are numerous other stats that might be important to some publishers, but if you include the ones above in your proposal, it will put you ahead of 90% of the competition. Also, if you start tracking these stats, I can almost guarantee you that you will start seeing growth. What gets measured, usually starts improving.

Question: How are your social media stats looking? You can leave a comment by clicking here.
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  • http://blog.cyberquill.com Cyberquill

    My social media stats are looking dismal. 

    • Cara Putman

      it’s truly something that builds over time. And you integrate among the sites to make the most of your time. But track every six months. How many followers do you have on each platform? It’s encouraging to see the actual growth in numbers that way.

      • http://courseadjustments.wordpress.com B_schebs

        I like the idea of looking at your states at set increments of time.  In the same way as you shouldn’t weigh yourself daily when trying to lose weight, checking your starts monthly, or quarterly seems to make sense and may smooth out some anomalies in the data.

        • http://www.bretmavrich.com Bret Mavrich

          But omigosh is it difficult not to “weigh in” daily.

          My bane is a little app I picked up for my iPhone called “Ego.” Aptly named (pun not intended, but I’m pleased as punch that it tumbled out). Down to the minute counter on analytics, feed burner, twitter followers, and a few other widgets.

          Mistake mistake mistake.

          • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

            I check first thing every morning and that’s it.

          • http://www.bretmavrich.com Bret Mavrich

            Do you have a smart phone?

      • http://blog.cyberquill.com Cyberquill

        With me, nothing ever builds over time. The upside is that I’m probably immune to plaque buildup in my arteries, too.

      • Jmhardy97

        You are correct and bring up a good point, trends can change  often. Constant evaluation is needed.

        Jim

  • http://www.warriorshepherd.com/blog Dave Hearn

    Some notes on analytics: 

    I use both Google Analytics and Statcounter.  I like statcounter’s interface better, and I can get some pretty detailed statistics on my site (and it’s simple to integrate into WP).  

    The interesting thing is that these two stat systems don’t always match up… so I’m scratching my head on that one. If anyone uses these tools and could give me some insight, I’d appreciate it.

    However, to answer your question, my social media stats are small but growing…!

    • http://refreshmentrefuge.blogspot.com Gina Burgess

      Dave, I have found the same thing. I also use Extreme stat counter. None of the stat counters agree, which is why I use all three. Extreme has been on my blog since my 3rd or 4th month blogging which is why I don’t want to get rid of it. Sitemeter seems to give me statistics on everything including page ranking so I know which pages are popular and which subjects are read the most. It also tells me where my referrals are coming from and what the searches are that brought the person to my blog. Plus the stats come to my inbox everyday instead of me having to remember to check. And it’s all free. I loaded Sitemeter on my blog about a year into blogging.

      Google Analytics doesn’t go that in depth for me giving me just the top 5 or 6 pages, and the top 5 referrals. I’ve only had Google Analytics for about a year. Of course this would make the totals disagree, but this is not why my daily counters don’t agree. 

      • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

        There are lots of stat packages out there, but I really would encourage Google Analytics. That is the one that is trusted. If you click past the first page, you can get all the detail could possibly want. You can still go ahead and use other packages for your own site management. (For example, I really like ChurchAnalytics.com. However, I would never submit those stats in a proposal as authoritative.

        • http://EFTCupid.com LOALoceCoach

          Hi Michael,

          I would like to encourage more commenting on my blogs.  I am getting good readership but my readers don’t leave comments.  Any ideas?

          Also, If you have an email optin for receiving blog posts when published, does the size of this email list have as much value as those who sign up for RSS feed?

          Thanks,
          Catherine

          • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

            I write a post a while back called, “7 Strategies for Increasing Your Blog Comments.” I think an email list has more value than RSS subscribers, because you know who they are.

          • http://www.tnealtarver.wordpress.com TNeal

            This is certainly my ignorance showing but what’s the difference between an email list vs. an RSS subscriber?

          • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

            An email subscription sends the post to your email inbox, using a service like MailChimp, AWeber or FeedBlitz. RSS syndicates the post to your feed reader (like Google Reader or Reeder).

          • http://www.tnealtarver.wordpress.com TNeal

            Thanks. My only experience has been with email subscriptions (both as a reader and a blogger). I just didn’t know it.

          • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=668400463 Ruby Brown

            Do you teach a writer’s course?  I have a Bachelor of Science Degree with my major in Home Economics.  I’ve had the dream to be a writer since early childhood, and I was privileged to have a poem I wrote to be accepted and published by The Beta Club Journal when in high school.  Many of my friends tell me I am a good writer and that I should publish my work.  I consider myself to be a spiritual person, and have taught Sunday School classes for each age level moving up teaching my own children until their senior year, then the adult women, and back down the same route as the church needed me.  VBS was the same way.  I even taught a couples class for years, but never taught the Adult Men’s Class as SBC frowned on women teaching men.  This has been a small church experience, with all the usual struggles; however, our faith in GOD has pulled us through.   I have been active in Woman’s Missionary Union for 50 years, serving in the local church and the Duck River Baptist Association, and as regional director of the South Central Promotion Region.  I’ve done church bulletins sveral years, and been the church pianist for over 40 years.  My husband and I have served faithfully in the same Southern Baptist Church for 50 years if  the LORD wills it that we make it to November 1, 2011.  I write to encourage my friends and family.  I have many stories to tell of how GOD has lead me through the years–however, I need the boost of a good writer’s group to help me take the plunge into the  Christian Writer Market.  Thanks for any help and direction you may want to offer.  May GOD continue to bless you and LifeWay.  Ruby Brown

          • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

            No, I am sorry, I don’t. You might want to search Google and see if there is a writer’s group in your city or town. You could also check on Facebook or Twitter. I’m wish I had better suggestions for you.

            You might also simply start blogging. Nothing hones your writing like writing.

        • http://refreshmentrefuge.blogspot.com Gina Burgess

          I agree, Mike, that Google Analytics would be more authoritative, I haven’t had them turned on long enough yet to do any real good. But, thanks for the tip about the other stat counters! I won’t use them in a book proposal :)

      • Joe Lalonde

        Gina, thanks for naming a few others that you use. I always like to have options even if I may never use them.

      • Jmhardy97

        Gina,

        do you see a big difference in them? It sounds like you like Sitemeter the best.

        Jim

        • http://refreshmentrefuge.blogspot.com Gina Burgess

          Hi Jim!

          I had to really study Google Analytics before I could answer this question. 

          Sitemeter gives me all the stats on the last 100 visitors, even to the smallest detail if I cared to know what their IP address is. It doesn’t give stats for particular months or weeks like Google Analytics does, so I can’t use it for an annual stat overview, just the last 100 visitors. 

          GA breaks down the stats into different reports on one page unlike Sitemeter where each report has its own page so it is more difficult to compare stats on Sitemeter. Although, GA does do the more indepth reports on a separate page. I have only had GA hooked up correctly since April, 2011 and I’ve had Sitemeter since 2006, so I can’t truly compare apples to apples, only apples to applesauce :D

          In the long run, I believe I will like GA better, but it will take some getting more familiar with it and I’ve got to figure out how to get it to email me automatically.

    • Jmhardy97

      Dave,

      Thank you for sharing. I had not heard of stat counter. I am new to this so I am thankful for the information.

      Jim

    • http://www.bretmavrich.com Bret Mavrich

      I’ve noticed that my WP stats via jetpack seem to diverge from my analytics stats. Weird. Just goes to show that what Mike is saying is true; hits are an unreliable way to measure.

  • http://missionsuntold.com Jordan Monson

    Great article! Now to improve the process of getting that following! It looks daunting…

  • http://insyncmarketing.co.uk Dan @ InSync Marketing

    Not ANOTHER Social media book..

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      This is not about social media stays IF your are writing a social media book. This is about incorporating these stats into EVERY book proposal.

  • http://brevis.me Robert Ewoldt

    My stats are growing, even though still small.  I get 1,700 unique visitors each month, with 3,500 pageviews.

    • http://www.tnealtarver.wordpress.com TNeal

      So, Robert, I laugh at what you think small is. To me, those numbers sound pretty robust. Unless of course, you’ve got a large extended family. How long have you been blogging?

      • http://brevis.me Robert Ewoldt

        I’ve been blogging for about 8 months. I’ve seen some significant growth in
        the last few months.

        • http://www.tnealtarver.wordpress.com TNeal

          Robert–I’m subscribed to your blog and I find you do well at informing me about issues and subjects I normally don’t read about. If you’re not an expert in your field, you sure have me fooled because you think deeply and express those thoughts well. I can understand to some extent why you’re seeing some significant growth.–Tom

    • Jmhardy97

      Robert,

      those are big numbers to some of us. I am sure that you did not start out with that many. Good job.

      Jim

  • http://davidsantistevan.com David Santistevan

    Since I kicked my blog into gear at the beginning of this year, I’ve seen my stats grow each and every month. Always nice to see progress!

    • Matt Lee

      Hey David, I go to church with your brother Mark in Philly.  I’ll have to find your blog!

      • http://www.bigb94.wordpress.com Brandon

        His blog is awesome! You can check his blog out at http://www.davidsantistevan.com. If you wanna read some awesome content, subscribe!

        • Jmhardy97

          Brandon,

          Thank you. I could not find the blog.

          Jim

          • http://www.bigb94.wordpress.com Brandon

            Oh really? Let me copy and paste it…maybe I spelled something wrong. It
            should be: http://www.davidsantistevan.com

            _____

          • http://www.tnealtarver.wordpress.com TNeal

            Jim–David’s name has an underline when it appears in the comment section (at least when I’m here on this site). When I click on his name (or anyone else’s with a line), the magic cyberspace guy whisks me directly to his site. I can’t tell you how or why that happens. The only explanation I can offer is I have special powers granted to me by the Internet gods to do good. Or, maybe, I have a Disqus account and it does that automatically. I do hope you find your way over to his place. He’s funny and writes good stuff (thus the reason people visit his site).–Tom

          • http://davidsantistevan.com David Santistevan

            Thanks for the kind words, Tom.

          • http://davidsantistevan.com David Santistevan

            Jim, did you ever find it? I think the links are working fine.

      • http://davidsantistevan.com David Santistevan

        Nice to meet you, Matt! That’s awesome. Tell Mark I said hi. Looks like Brandon left you the link to my blog below.

    • http://www.tnealtarver.wordpress.com TNeal

      I started well, saw growth jump in month 2, and dive within a week of my highest peak. It’s an interesting venture this blogging stuff. Michael’s website and his followers (sounds a lot more mystical than it really is) encourage and teach me so much.

  • http://twitter.com/RookieWriter David Barry DeLozier

    If you have these numbers but they are low, is it best to not bring them up?

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      If they are too low, I would try to get by with mentioned that you have started a blog and are Facebook and Twitter. It is not impossible to get a book deal with low stats, but it is more difficult.

      • http://twitter.com/RookieWriter David Barry DeLozier

        Thanks. I’ve been on Facebook, Twitter and blogging for several years but not “working it” as I was finishing my manuscript so now I need to do it all! Sure appreciate your generous advice.

      • http://byrdmouse.wordpress.com Jonathan

        I’ve found that replying to your blog has increased the number of people who see my blog. Granted it’s less than 3 months old, but other then a few family members I didn’t start with much of an audience. I’m still concentrating on figuring out how to grow it, but knowing these are the things I’ll want to measure will help me grow in the right direction.

        And in another tab of my browser I am signing up for Google Analytics and will figure out how to add it to my WordPress blog.

        • http://courseadjustments.wordpress.com B_schebs

          According to the WordPress.com people,  they do not allow google analytics on Wp.com.  Bummer

          • Joe Lalonde

            That stinks, but keep an eye on that. It can always change.

          • http://courseadjustments.wordpress.com B_schebs

            True, I am watching.  I hope withing about 3-6 months to upgrade to self-hosted.  Than I can add all to cool things.

          • http://byrdmouse.wordpress.com Jonathan

            Do they allow it on the upgraded (paid) version? It may be time already.

          • http://courseadjustments.wordpress.com B_schebs

            If you self-host, or use a service like @mhyatt:disqus it appears you can add it because you have more access to the site and the code to enter it.

          • http://byrdmouse.wordpress.com Jonathan

            I think that’s what it takes to be able to add Disqus, too. I think I’m hesitant to switch because I haven’t figured out all the bells, whirls and whistles of the free site, much less of blogging in general. The real problem is that if this is the point of it, why mess around?
            I have a lot of things to consider.

          • http://courseadjustments.wordpress.com B_schebs

            I have an ever growing wishlist of things I want to get.  So far, all but 1 requires swithing to a WP.org blog.  Now to find the most cost effective way to accomplish and learn a little bit more about coding/html.

          • http://stevencribbs.com Steven Cribbs

            I started out on a self-hosted site a few months ago.  There are more options to work with than a wp.com site; but, it is not necessarily more difficult.  You start small (pick a decent theme and the basic plugins) and build as you have time – you don’t have to do everything at once.

            John, over at tentblogger.com, has a great series of tutorials for getting started with a self-hosted blog – The Ultimate Guide to Launching a WordPress-Powered Blog.  Again, you don’t have to do everything at once.  But, with the tools (self-hosted wp) in place, then you can build as you are ready to.

          • Jmhardy97

            Thank you for the advice. I will check out tentblogger. I am not a great techno person so I could use the tutorials.

            Jim

          • http://EndLoveSabotage.com LOALoveCoach

            So worth going to wordpress.org  You can do some real magic there!

          • http://courseadjustments.wordpress.com B_schebs

            Do you have any experience or tips on making the transition?

          • http://brevis.me Robert Ewoldt

            Bschebs, I see that you’ve already moved to a self-hosted blog! Good
            thought. I really like the self-hosted version.

        • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

          Good for you.

        • Jmhardy97

          Jonathan

          I have seen the same thing with Twitter. As I increase the replys, I get more followers.

          Jim

      • http://twitter.com/RookieWriter David Barry DeLozier

        Do publishers visit an author’s website when reviewing a submission? If numbers (twitter followers, facebook friends) are low, does a fresh website help?

        • http://www.lifeofasteward.com Loren Pinilis

          Dave, I’m not positive, but I would imagine the popular publishers are quite busy and inundated with requests. They may visit your website if your proposal seems interesting, but I wouldn’t count on them visiting the site as part of a routine evaluation of your proposal.

          • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

            This is exactly right. They are going to evaluate the proposal on it’s premise or literary merit first. Your proposed product is evaluated first, then your platform. Publishers will not spend much, if any, time on the second issue until they are excited about the first one.

          • http://twitter.com/RookieWriter David Barry DeLozier

            Thanks – I’m just trying to prioritize efforts on blog, twitter, facebook and website (while running my business!).  I (of course) believe my book has compelling literary merit, just wondering what a publisher would look at next …

          • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

            Blog first, Twitter and Facebook second. Your blog is your “home base.”

          • Jmhardy97

            Michael,

            Thank you for that advice. I was curious as to which one was the best to start with. I just started on Twitter and I am working on getting a blog put together, but I want to make a good impact and not get the cart before the hoarse.

            Jim

  • http://mirrorsandwindowsnow.blogspot.com/ Alicha

    rotfl (roll on the floor laughing)~ I just discovered that’s the new LOL…Not in response to your post, but my stats.

    That said, I will say they’ve gotten better since you gave advice on how to increase blog traffic which you posted a couple of months ago. AND the Lord just gave me new direction (which was lacking) in my blogging! So excited about that!

    Blog on!

    • Joe Lalonde

      Sorry to hear that your stats are ROTFL worthy. They’ll grow in time. Just keep plugging away and they’ll grow.

      I also checked out your blog. I liked it. Your “Here We Go” entry was an interesting read.

  • Christa Allan

    Succinct, informative post. How should a blog “grow” commenters?

    • http://mirrorsandwindowsnow.blogspot.com/ Alicha

      Hey Christa~ If you go to “search blog” and plug in something like “how to increase blog traffic” a number of blog  post on that topic come up! Good luck!

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Scan back up through the comments where I answered the question a few times. I have written a post on this. It is in my archives.

  • http://successbeginstoday.org/wordpress John Richardson

    Very helpful post, Michael. An additional stat that authors might want to include is their highest traffic month during the year. This would be especially useful for publishers for planning a book launch. In my case, being a personal development blogger, my traffic soars on January first and then tapers off into March and April. This has been consistent for the six years I have been blogging.

    I’m currently working on a book about goal setting. The perfect time to launch this book would be in December, since interest peaks on January 1st. It’s incredible to look at this stat closely. My traffic doesn’t jump on December 31st at all. It’s not until New Year’s day that people start thinking about weight loss, goal setting, and going to the gym.

    Another stat which you can actually do something about is looking at your traffic on a weekly basis. My stats usually peak on Monday or Tuesday and then taper off into the weekend. My lowest days have always been Saturday and Sunday. I started experimenting by publishing a post on Sundays and using Twitter and Facebook to announce it. This made a huge difference. While blog readership peaks during the week, Facebook peaks at night and over the weekend (many people don’t have access to Facebook or Twitter at work). By using social media to drive traffic, I was able to raise my blog stats considerably on my lowest weekend days. This has helped me keep my overall stats up over the usually slower summer months.

    Some Facebook stats from Buddy Media…

    Posts with 80 characters or less,  the length of a short
    tweet, garner 27% more engagement than posts that are more than 80
    characters.You’ll get 15% more engagement with a question at the end of a post than if the question is buried in the middle.So… on Facebook, it’s best to keep it short and ask questions.Overall my stats are up about 30% this year over last and my Klout score has really jumped since I started using Twitter and Facebook to drive traffic. Thanks for posts like this, Mike. I always pick up great tips from you and your readers.

    • http://LookingForPurpose.com Dylan Dodson

      Thanks for including those stats! And very good ideas.

    • http://refreshmentrefuge.blogspot.com Gina Burgess

      John, this is great information. I hadn’t thought about Facebook being a night-time tool. But after I looked at my stats, when I post in late afternoon, I do get more visits than when I post in the morning. Rats! I’ve already posted today.

      • http://LookingForPurpose.com Dylan Dodson

        You can still post in the morning and wait to “share” you post on Facebook until nighttime when more people are online!

        • http://refreshmentrefuge.blogspot.com Gina Burgess

          Good point, Dylan, except I’ve got my accounts set up so my posts automatically posts to Facebook and Twitter. However, it doesn’t hurt to post 2-3 times to Twitter throughout the day instead of just once like I’ve been doing. Thanks for making me think :)

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Great stuff, John. Excellent, sound advice.

      • http://successbeginstoday.org/wordpress John Richardson

        Just curious, Mike, what is your best traffic month?

        • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

          It is hard for me to tell, John, because it has been going up steadily every month. There is a modest peak in January.

    • Jmhardy97

      Great advice John.

      Jim

  • http://LookingForPurpose.com Dylan Dodson

    The unfortunate thing about Twitter is that number of followers seem to mean less and less because anyone can gain a large following by simply following a lot of people and having them follow them back.

    Thanks for the info, as always it’s great advice!

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      The people that usually say this are people with a low number of followers. Don’t believe it.

      By the way, Twitter hasn’t allowed “aggressive following” for more than a year. If you do this, you are likely to get your account suspended. I know several people this happened to.

      • http://LookingForPurpose.com Dylan Dodson

        That’s interesting, I was not aware of that. 

  • http://www.leahadams.org Leah Adams

    I’m in trouble……

    • http://davidatodd.com David A. Todd

      Me too.

      • esthersdestiny.blogspot.com

        Me three…and four!  :)

  • http://www.SammyA.com Sammy Adebiyi

    Michael, i know you included your own stats but could you please give us an idea of what kind of numbers to shoot for as a goal for new bloggers looking to build a platform (towards book proposal)?

    Like on average how many unique visitors/page views am i looking to show a publisher?

    • http://jasonfountain.blogspot.com Jason Fountain

      Sammy, I’m with you. I feel like I have no idea where I should be as a beginning blogger and how soon my numbers should start jumping. Good question.

    • http://www.bigb94.wordpress.com Brandon

      I’d like to know that as well!

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Please see my replies to others in this thread.

  • http://jasonfountain.blogspot.com Jason Fountain

    I’ve only been blogging for two months so I have a small following. I think I’m still trying to find my voice, but I really need a solid plan for growing my following. I’ve been commenting on other blogs quite a bit, but that takes a tremendous amount of time if I’m going to be sincere and genuine.

    From reading this and other posts, it seems that to grow a blog you need to guest post and produce content to bring people to your site. I’m still working  on this and need to develop a specific plan for growing my followers. Can anyone suggest where I can find solid strategy in this area? Of course, I guess content is king so for now I’m working on my writing as well. Thanks!

    • http://refreshmentrefuge.blogspot.com Gina Burgess

      Jason, if you want to really grow you following, then you need to post everyday, post relevant material (that is incorporate key words in your title and in your first paragraph of your post), and write your passion AND most importantly, write what God puts on your heart — people know when you are just posting for stats because it shows and they won’t come back.

      If you write just for higher stats, you really aren’t doing what God has laid on your heart, therefore you are pursuing a dream rather than doing the work God has prepared for you. I’m not saying you are not to do your part, even the Children of Israel had to go out and gather manna.

      I’ve been a blogger for 6 years, and I almost let my blog die from lack of attention two years ago, so all the followers I had built left and I basically had to start all over. If it is what God has called you to do, blogging is a commitment just like marriage. If you neglect it, it will fall apart.

      • http://jasonfountain.blogspot.com Jason Fountain

        Gina, thanks for the great advice. The hardest part (to me) as a beginning blogger is to not focus solely on growth. I need to find a balance. But, like you said, first and foremost I must focus on content and make sure that my heart is in the right place. Great advice – thanks!

        • http://refreshmentrefuge.blogspot.com Gina Burgess

          You are welcome, Jason. I agree with John below. I’ve learned more reading Mike’s blog than I learned the first 2 years of blogging!

          • http://brevis.me Robert Ewoldt

            Me, too, Gina! I’ve learned so much from Michael!

        • esthersdestiny

          This is the hardest thing for me, too. I’m a new blogger trying to build, and it is so easy to get overwhelmed by everything there is to learn, and to let my focus shift away from the message that God is placing on my heart. It is an every day task to keep my priorities in line – really a spiritual discipline. Thanks. 

      • Jmhardy97

        Great advice. Thank you for sharing.

        Jim

    • http://successbeginstoday.org/wordpress John Richardson

      Hi Jason, you have great content on your blog and it’s easy to see you have a passion for writing. You are at a critical place that most bloggers find themselves soon after starting. You’ve been blogging for a couple of months, you got a little traffic, and you wonder if it is all worth it. Most beginning bloggers quit at this stage. The average life cycle of a blog is about 3 months. The rewards simply don’t match the effort and time required.

      To make this blogging thing work takes persistence and passion. From your writing, it sounds like you have both. Here is what I’ve found over my six years.

      1. Real results take at least six months to a year to find traction.

      2. You need to find a unique niche (experimenting with different ideas really helps)

      3. You need to get picked up by other blogs in your niche.

      4. You have to like writing and commenting.

      In my early days, sites like Problogger and entrepreneurs-journey were invaluable. They can help you see how the process works and put the tools in place to gather traffic. Spend some time on sites like these and fine tune your posts with sites like Copyblogger and tentblogger. 

      This site is a great starting point to develop your voice. There is so much conversation here, that it makes it easy to see what visitors are thinking and what works for different people. Michael is one of the most helpful bloggers on the planet. I’ve learned more here than any other site.

      Bottom line: Keep at it and you’ll soon see your blog take off!

      • http://jasonfountain.blogspot.com Jason Fountain

        John, wow – thank you for taking the time to write that informative response. I enjoy reading your blog. You offer offer solid advice for living a great life. Thanks, again.

      • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

        Thanks, John. Your advice is spot-on.

      • Jmhardy97

        John,

        vrey good. This is why I am waiting to make sure that I do it right. Everyday when I read these post, I learn more things that I need to do.

        Jim

        • http://successbeginstoday.org/wordpress John Richardson

          Things change everyday. I just got a notice from Amazon today that my affiliate account has been cancelled due to a sales tax bill passed by Jerry Brown in California. No warning… no notice… just zip nada gone!

          I don’t make a lot on the account but it does pay for a few books each month. Some people make their entire income off of affiliate items. A lot of big affiliates will now move out of California. About the only good thing in this state anymore is the weather…

          • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

            If I am not mistaken, the bill hasn’t been signed into law yet. Amazon says they will pull the plug if it is. (It’s amazing that Gov. Brown doesn’t see the connection.)

          • http://successbeginstoday.org/wordpress John Richardson

            I heard on the radio tonight that Governor Brown has committed to signing the bill. Amazon will just cancel their affiliates like they did in other states, and California will lose out on $124 million in state income tax from these businesses. Amazon won’t pay a cent of sales tax, since they won’t have a presence in the state without the affiliates. A lose, lose proposition. It really shows how fragile the income is of pro bloggers and others that have just one source of income. Hopefully, at least some of these businesses can relocate.

          • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

            It also shows how incredibly stupid politicians can be.

          • http://brevis.me Robert Ewoldt

            The same thing happened in Illinois recently, and Amazon just quit using
            affiliates in the state.

    • http://www.bigb94.wordpress.com Brandon

      I’m in the same boat as you!

    • http://courseadjustments.wordpress.com B_schebs

      I really enjoy reading your work everyday,  Keep it up and the followers will come.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      There are dozens of strategies but no silver bullet. I would start by reading this: “3 Bloggers Every Serious Blogger Should Be Following.” This will begin to educate you on the kinds of activities that lead to growth.

      By the way, nothing is more important for traffic that writing regularly. If you are not generating high-quality posts on a consistent basis, nothing will help you.

    • http://stevencribbs.com Steven Cribbs

      Hey Jason, I have been in a similar situation too.  The advice given in the comments responding to you above is really good.  I have heard similar thoughts and implementing them has helped my blog a lot.

      I am about 6 months in to my blog and am now beginning to see some results from the effort.  In fact, this month has been incredible for my young blog.

      I found, inadverntently, a topic that lots of people are interested in this time of year (Vacation Bible School) and I wrote on it everyday for over a week – recounting experiences and writing about how we implemented various aspects.  Since then, the search traffic on the blog has increased dramatically…along with visitors and page views.

      So, I would say, if it is important to you, stick with it, give it your all, implement some of the advice seen here, and just write.  Let the results (and the traffic) worry about itself.

  • http://www.forward-living.com W. Mark Thompson

    Awesome! EXCELLENT information here!! Increase your loyal, active, and engaged following and increase your chances of getting published. I’ve got a friend who was approached by Thomas Nelson to write a book. Mainly – I believe – because of her following via social media (Twitter).

    Love the way you break it down numerically. VERY helpful. But even if you don’t get published commercially, building a loyal fan-based audience will help self-published book sales significantly.

    Thanks for this post!

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Yes, absolutely. Having an active social media presence is even more essential of you self-publish.

  • http://beckfarfromhome.blogspot.com/ Beck Gambill

    I grew by leaps and bounds in April and May. That growth has tapered out and even dropped off. It takes an enormous amount of work to grow an audience, I feel in over my head. Once again I appreciate your straight forward advice.

  • http://thisismethinking.com/ Darrell Vesterfelt

    I have been blogging for about two months now — i am pretty happy with the results so far. Lots of room for growth though.

  • http://chriscornwell.org Chris Cornwell

    My presence is growing. I’ve seen a bump in all categories since my blog redesign and since I’ve started commenting on other peoples’ sites. Now if I could just get the ball rolling on people commenting on my site. Wish there was some magic trick to getting people to comment other than just reading and bouncing.

  • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

    Mike, are there magic bench marks to shoot for? For example, don’t bother submitting a proposal until you have 1000 Twitter followers. Are there main numbers that publishers look for?

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      I knew someone would ask this. ;-)

      I think it really depends on the genre and the overall proposal. Fiction writers are generally going to have lower numbers than non-fictions ones.

      I would start by setting your own goals in each of these areas and work toward that. If you are generally happy with your stats, you will be far more convincing as you pitch the proposal to others.

      • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

        Dangit. I’m never happy with my stats! (Always wanting more.)

        What’s next? Are you going to tell me to “be content in all things”? Not cool, Mike. NOT cool. ;-)

        • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

          No, I think a little “holy discontent” is a good thing!

          • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

            I was, of course, teasing, and love how you challenge yourself to achieve new milestones without obsessing over metrics.

          • http://www.kristievosper.com Kristie Vosper

            Oh, alright, I didn’t scroll down on my new iPad far enough to see this thread. Jeff I had the same question. (woo hoo new iPad! Loving it so far.)

            I’ve doubled my twitter following this month and have set goals for this summer. I like a little self-competition. :)

            Going to download Google Analytics today. Thank you so much Michael for your invaluable blog.

    • http://suburbiauncovered.com/ Matt Powell

      Jeff, you asked the question we were all thinking :) Thanks.

      • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

        Seriously, I still want to know!

  • http://LiveIntentionally.org Paul Steinbrueck

    Hey Mike, thanks for this post. There are so many social media metrics that can be thrown around, it’s helpful to know what publishers are looking for.  A couple follow-up questions…

    1) What do publishers in general and Thomas Nelson specifically use to verify blog metrics?

    2) How seriously are publishers in general and Thomas Nelson specifically taking a person’s Klout score? Everyone likes the simplicity of a single, independently generated number to score each  person’s social media influence, but it’s not without its flaws.

    Thanks,
    Paul

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Most publishers will take your word for it. However, I am always prepared if they want verification in the form of screenshots. I don’t think Klout score means much yet, but it will as publishers become more educated on what it means. Thanks.

  • http://courseadjustments.wordpress.com B_schebs

    Well I launched my blog courseadjustments.wordpress.com on Saturdat.  So far here is what I got.

    1 I can’t find unique visitors stat on WordPress.com’s stat page.
    2 Page Views 224
    3  not been bloging long enough
    4  3.75 comments per post
    5  no Subs according to WP but do see a few people coming in from Google Reader
    6  21 Twitter (@courseadjs) and 12 fans of FB Page  (not counting my personal followers@courseadjs:disqus /friends)

    SO far, I am impressed with the support and readership I am getting.  A Special thanks to the friends I have made here in the comments, for checking it out,  Proofreading (your great @Byrdmouse:disqus ) and lending support and idea.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      You really should install Google Analytics. It is easy and will have much ore credibility with knowledgable publishers.

      • http://courseadjustments.wordpress.com B_schebs

        I tried,  but with being on a wordpress.com hosted blog, I don’t have the option. Once I get going I hope to find the funds to do a self-hosted so I can make those additions.

    • http://www.bigb94.wordpress.com Brandon

      Great stats! You can not get unique visitors (I don’t think) with just WP. You have to go get an outside source…ie. sitemeter, google analytics, etc.

  • http://twitter.com/eBookVoice eBook Voice

    This is so interesting! I hadn’t even considered social media when submitting a book proposal. Didn’t really think they would matter, but I guess I was wrong. :) I guess with anything these days, our social media platforms are extremely important to showcase who we are and what kind of influence we have. I bet it’s a major perk for publishers if their authors are already well known in some way. 

    Great tips!

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Yes, absolutely. Some old school publishers may not see the value, but the kind of publishers you want to publish with do!

  • http://www.bigb94.wordpress.com Brandon

    I am a little bit down this month… I am getting an average of about 3,500 pageviews per month. And the average amount of comments would probably be 12 per post. Last month, these stats would have been a lot higher!

    I guess bloggers will always go through a low month? Any advice to get through it? I’ve started hosting free ad contests every month… (one is running right now!)

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      The key is to compare this month to the same month last year. This is not the default in Google Analytics. I have found that June always has less traffic for me than May. People are on vacation, outside more, and just not on the Web as much.

      I would just keep plodding away. When I go through a down period, the boat eventually rights itself.

      • http://www.bigb94.wordpress.com Brandon

        Thanks for the encouragement! I am sure that is the problem… Hopefully, my
        free ad contest will drive some people! I might start giving away books
        too!?

        _____

      • http://LookingForPurpose.com Dylan Dodson

        Good to know. I’ve been feeling a bit discouraged this month at my site stats even though I am blogging more than usual. Perhaps this is the reason.

    • http://davidatodd.com David A. Todd

      Good grief, I’d be turning cartwheels at that number. After 3+ years of blogging I get an average of 400 per month. The only good news is June 11 over June 10 is up 69%.

      • http://www.bigb94.wordpress.com Brandon

        That’s good! 69% is huge!

        _____

        • http://davidatodd.com David Todd

          But easy from a small base.

  • http://www.fivestonefight.com John

    Michael – What if your numbers are low (100 unique visitors in the last month)? Should you include these numbers? 

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      I would not. I would focus on the fact that you have started a blog and are in the process of growing traffic.

      • Igreenrise

        Michael,
         
        Thanks for the detailed info you share with us. But I have a question for you; What about some one who doesn’t dream about becoming an author, some one like a soldier who has been in war , or even some one who has been living in North Korea or Iran (like my own case) and has many untold stories and just wants to narrate a non-ordinary series of events or a true story , some one who just wants to publish once, a memoir, for instance … and he doesn’t know how the system works here in North America, or he’s not into blogs (but have some connections with the media) ,  however because of the nature of the book and his/her unique experience (and based on the success of similar books) it is almost obvious that he will attract a huge number of readers ?! What would be the publishers respond to that ?! Is there any other way for him except self-publishing ? (And you know that for someone who’s not familiar with the system , self-publishing could be very harmful). Help me please.

        • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

          The challenge is to get this on the radar of a publisher. You would have to either write a book proposal yourself or find a collaborator. I don’t have a simple answer.

    • John

      Sorry, you answered same question below. Thanks!

  • Antdina

    Well done. Thanks

  • Cara Putman

    This was great information. Thanks! I’ve monitored a bunch of stats for a couple years for book proposals but was never sure I hit the right ones. Now I know. Question though: I went to Klout and have a score of 44. What does that mean?

    • Cara Putman

      Never mind: here’s the link to Klout score meanings. http://corp.klout.com/kscore

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      When you sign into Klout, it will tell you what everything means.

  • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

    I have never concentrated on my social media stats. As a budding professional, I feel I should start intentional building of my effective online presence and solid social media platform.

  • Joe Lalonde

    Thanks for this timely post. I’ve been talking to a friend who’s looking to get published and I’ve recommended social media as a way to get noticed. This will give her something to shoot for!

  • http://jonstolpe.wordpress.com Jon Stolpe

    My stats have been growing especially the past month or two, but I’ve been struggling with balancing consistency with content.  I want to participate in the social media community to help myself and others grow (ultimately towards Christ), yet I sometimes find myself overly worried about the numbers when I need to be mindful of quality, inspiration, and motivation.

    I do appreciate the advice though – especially as I consider becoming an author.  It’s not on the front burner yet, but it’s on my bucket list.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      You are right to put the priority on content. Both are important, but content must come before platform.

  • Anonymous

    Michael

    Excellent and timely post for our company, thank you.  

    My question is driven by target market.  Our bulls-eye target customer are new grandparents and those who have grandchildren less than 7 yrs old.   

    We have studied this market and while they are active on the web and have Facebook accounts, their Internet behavior is more of a “tool” and they tend to be more “traditional” to stay in touch with friends and family, and getting news and weather.   They are not so much the “explorers” as younger generations.  They are also not tweeters.

    Do agents and publishers take the target market and their specific behaviors into account, or to they paint with a broad bush or even a roller?

    Thank you again

    Walter Petticrew
    Founder & CEO
    Genre Group LLC

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      It depends on how sophisticated the publisher is. I think pitching a book proposal is like any kind of selling: You have to educate your customer (i.e., the publisher).

  • http://mysimpleinspiration.com Christopher Jones

    Great post! Your blog is one that I do not miss.I use (paid for) WordPress. I have a Google Analytics account (when I used Blogger a few years ago). I can not setup Google Analytics to work with my blog site. WordPress help tells me that Google Analytics does not work with the paid for version of WordPress but only with WordPress.org sites. WordPress Dashboard does not give me nearly the kind of information that Google Analytics does.I was recently featured by WordPress on “Freshly Pressed” and only have a limited view to the stats from that weekend. Do you have any other suggestions?Your example as a blogger is a large reason I blog today. Thank you for your very useful content.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      I just realized that Google Analytics can’t be used with WordPress.com. Major bummer. I’m sorry, I don’t have any other suggestions, as I used self-hosted WordPress.

      • http://courseadjustments.wordpress.com B_schebs

        @mhyatt:disqus , I do almost all of my blog from my Ipad.  Did you have need to work from a different device for your self-hosted, while you had your Ipad?

        • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

          I didn’t have to, but I did. I’m sure you can find software that will enable you to blog with a self-hosted WP site via iPad.

      • http://byrdmouse.wordpress.com Jonathan

        I’m back to being confused. I use the free WordPress, but am considering upgrading to the paid for, particularly if that is what it takes to use Google Analytics. Is self-hosted WordPress different then just paying for a premium upgrade? I may need to just browse WordPress’s site for an answer.

        • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

          Yes. You have free WordPress.com, Premium WordPress.com (which you pay for and has additional features), and self-hosted WordPress (the software itself is free).

        • http://courseadjustments.wordpress.com B_schebs

          From the reading I have done on their site, It seems the only option to use things like AdSense and analytics is with a Self-Hosted

  • http://www.christopherneiger.com/blog Chris Neiger

    I’ve been obsessing over my blog stats lately, maybe not in a good way. It’s hard to find the balance between tracking stats so that I can improve them and tracking stats just to feel good about  the blog. 

    Are you planning on writing a post on how to increase exposure via social media? Would love to hear your thoughts on that. 

    Thanks for the great post!

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Chris, search my archives under social media. I have written quite a bit on this already.

  • copygirl

    Thanks, Michael, for the interesting post. I wanted to let you know, though, that I believe your formula in #3 is incorrect. After 15 years in retail, the formula is still drilled into my head as, “This Year minus Last Year, divided by Last Year.” So your increase would be 205.8 percent, not 305.8. It makes sense if you just think that a 100 percent increase of 54K would be 108K, and if you add another 54K to that for 200 percent, you would be at 162K, almost to your new number.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Thanks for catching that. You are correct. I have changed the formula in the post.

  • Kristievosper

    Hi Michael,

    I’m assuming that you avoided sharing an answer to the “how many” question, but I’m curious.

    As I’m building my “tribe,” what kinds of goals should I be setting before I start pursuing an agent and focusing on creating proposals? I’m trying to go about this process realistically and not rush through it.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Yes, I did answer this in a couple of other replies. I don’t have a one-size-fits-all answer. It really depends on the type of book, the engagement of your audience, etc. IF I was forced to pick a number, I would say 10,000 uniques a month is a good first goal.

  • http://www.tnealtarver.wordpress.com TNeal

    I’m still trying to figure out Google Analytics and how to connect my website to it but I find this post helpful. What this whole blogging experience teaches me is how to think strategically. I ask a lot more questions (such as: how in the heck does this stuff work?) plus learn a whole new language (I was better at new languages in my teens–such a distant memory).

  • http://www.tnealtarver.wordpress.com TNeal

    I’m reading what other people are writing and finding the comment that Google Analytics, as well as Disqus, can’t be used on a WordPress.com site. I know that I’m now signed up with both and that I haven’t figured out how to use them with my site. So is that the case–no GA or Disqus on WP.com?

  • http://www.godsabsolutelove.com Patricia Zell

    Thanks, Michael for the encouragement. Although I don’t post very often, I still had 1530 unique visitors in the last month with 5,660 page views. However, the same month last year, I had 1851 unique visitors with 14,694 page views (once-a-week posts at that time). What that tells me is that I better get back to posting, so my goal is to finish my curriculum for all three of the courses I’ll be teaching next school year. Hopefully, by the end of August, I’ll have everything ready to go and will be able to spend more time on  marketing my book and writing posts. My press release campaign will be ready in mid-July, so I’m happy about that. I’m planning  on just keeping my shoulder to the plow and plodding along until the job is done.

  • http://suburbiauncovered.com/ Matt Powell

    This is so very helpful.  Honestly, I am still often troubled by the limitations this could put on really good writers out there…. but, at the same time, I totally understand.  Like everything else, the hard part is the endurance/perseverance to push forward on the journey.  We all have that desire to arrive now… when often times I believe God is more concerned about the process than he is the destination.

  • Ali Smith

    I set up Google Analytics but can’t seem to figure out how to get it to track my blog. Can it work for a normal wordpress.com blog or do you have to have wordpress.org? Do you think wordpress.com stats are sufficient?

    Thanks a lot for your great content!

    Blessings,

    Ali Smith

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      It will not work with WordPress.com. Sorry.

    • http://www.megaphonesites.com Jeremy Santy

      Yes, you would have to port your blog over to a self-hosted wordpress.org setup. Also, WordPress charges a small fee if you want them to transfer it for you. If you have a large audience, I bet this would be worth it for you.

  • http://ericspeir.com/ Eric

    What a great post. I just installed Google Analytics this past week and am just amazed at what it does. It’s interesting that I was just wondering this week what publishers and advertisers go by when looking at our blog traffic. Great post. Keep them coming!

  • http://joyfulmothering.net Christin

    I’d say not too terrible. There is growth. Twitalyzer shows me at a score of 4.1, which is in the 90th percentile of Tweeters.

    Klout gave me a score of 58. My blog is doing well for being under a year old. I had a lot of growth in May as I helped a friend promote her e-book by hosting the challenge offered in it on my blog throughout the month. But, things have quieted down, though I have gained much growth from it!

    Can’t complain, really. Just need to be patient and keep working! :)

  • http://twitter.com/mattplynn Matt Lynn

    I’m very new to the blog scene, but have always enjoyed writing and I’ve written for various blogs over past couple of years. Now I’m really trying to go it alone with my own site. WordPress has really nice stats built in – how do the onboard WordPress stats stand up against Google Analytics? 

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      They are fine, just not as authoritative.

  • Jmhardy97

    Very good post as most are looking to make the biggest impact.

    Jim

  • Anonymous

    Thanks for this post. I’m going to clip this for Evernote.  I often wondered about merging what I saw with Google Analytics and Feedburner. 

    One stat I don’t get is “Bounce Rate” in Google Analytics.  I know the lower the number the better. Why  would I care?  If someone takes a minute to read post and leaves, I’m good with that.  Why would I want to keep them there if they are a regular reader?

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Great question. Bounce rate represents how “sticky” your site is. If people come and then dig deeper into your archives, your bounce rate goes down. The longer people stay on your site and the more content they read, the more it drives your pageviews. Also, the more influential you are with them.

      Two strategies for improving your bounce rate: (1) internal links to other posts on your site and (2) easy-to-use navigation that entices readers to click deeper into the site.

      • turner_bethany

        Great information. Thank you!

  • http://twitter.com/allstarpress All Star Press

    As always, very helpful article. Thank you.

  • turner_bethany

    This is great information to have. Thank you so much for sharing, Michael. I am going to check out Google Analytics. 

  • http://change.me Oleg Sinitsin

    Great post! BTW, this article made into The Morning Lowdown list on PaidContent – http://paidcontent.org/article/419-the-morning-lowdown-06-28-111/

    Publicity never hurts, or does it?

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Very cool.

  • http://www.rebeccaetc.com Rebecca Eaton

    I’m almost finished with my first non-fiction book and am waiting to hear back from a query to a publisher. In the meantime, I’ve been focusing more on my social platform.

    In order to generate interest in the book for my followers/friends/subscribers, I thought about posting various sentences, lines, ideas, etc. from the book through Twitter/FB/blog and see how people respond. However, I’m highly neurotic about people taking my quotes and claiming them as their own or otherwise stealing those ideas.

    Is there any copyright protection for the manuscript I have yet to publish? Or perhaps I should wait until it’s accepted before starting to market the book specifically.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Yes. Your manuscript is protected from the moment you create it.

  • Susan Wilkinson

    Michael do you see influence indicators like @klout:disqus  being used by publishers in the future? I’m thinking as these types of services are refined that they could be useful. Numbers of followers can be deceptive, on Twitter and FB especially, but klout does track the number of likes and comments you get on FB, which is a good indication of influence.

    (sorry if this question was asked already)

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Yes, I do, as publishers become more sophisticated. I think it is up to all of us (collectively) to educate them (and ourselves).

  • Danblackonleadership

    I plan on writing a leadership book after I have a strong platform built. Social media is a focus for me. I have seen my blog grow greatly by using it.
    I have seen steady growth each month.

    Thank you for the helpful post.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=668400463 Ruby Brown

    This is good information.  Thank you so much.  I am still learning my way around The Internet. 
    I have a lot of things I want to say and do within the Christian Writer Context when the time is ready for GOD to use me in this way if HE has that plan for me.  Thanks again, I have been a Southern Baptist for over 50 years.  May GOD bless you.  Ruby Bown 

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=668400463 Ruby Brown

    I appreciate LifeWay very much. Thank You.

  • Pingback: What to Measure | Greg Rhodes()

  • kiera oberoi
  • Jawwad Karim

    Its so enlightening to learn about the usefulness of social
    media for business marketing. I am quite thrilled by the ideas of usefulness of
    social media for marketing of goods and services, and regularly seek such blog.
    The blog which really got me going for social media marketing was the one
    written by Hammad Siddiqui – a change management expert – and the blog was this
    one which talked about a local issue:

     

    http://hammadsiddiquiblog.com/the-untapped-facebook-opportunity-in-pakistan/

  • Anonymous

    Thank you so much for posting this. I just used it to spiff up my book proposal – and it also helped be to think critically about how I should be growing my platform.

    Really practical and useful

  • Carl Harmon

    Nice info. Thanks for sharing.

    Digital Media Consultant

  • Anonymous

    A really useful post, thank you. 

    I’ve been blogging for three years now and never really worried about my stats – I had a core following of friends and family. When I decided to self publish this year I knew I needed to use my platform better.  I’m three months into a campaign to increase my traffic and have seen visits triple. It’s that old balloon scenario – you push and push slowly and then all of a sudden things start expanding a lot quicker.  And there’s nothing like a couple of good retweets to blow your stats out!

    One thing I’ve found is that the three years previously of regular blogging gives me a solid core of posts that are picked up in searches or through linkwithin. 

    I was interested to read your assessment elsewhere about posting regularly. I find that six posts a week keeps my stats on a solid footing. If I drop down to five I notice a significant drop in visits.

  • http://www.WritingPlatform.com Michael K. Reynolds

    Great insights into building a Writing Platform. Not only is it a critical part of getting approval of agents, editors and publishing houses, it gives you the power of proactively selling your books.

  • Anonymous

    I like the idea of ​​seeing the reports with the time increments. In the same way that you should not weigh yourself every day trying to lose weight, control your monthly or quarterly seems to make sense and can smooth the anomalies in the data.

  • BarbK

    So how can you tell the “UNIQUE VISITORS” on your blog?  I can see the number of views, but don’t know how many are unique visitors.  Thanks for helping me, as I’m not sure how to do this yet. 

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      It depends on the blog software and what plugins (if any) you have installed. What you really want is Google Analytics (Google it).

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  • AnnabelSmith

    This is really useful information. What are some benchmarks for each of these things on how high they need to be in order to be worth mentioning?

    • http://michaelhyatt.com/ Michael Hyatt

      There really aren’t any. Anything is better than nothing. Even if they are low, it shows you have started.

      • AnnabelSmith

        Thanks