Why Some Organizations Succeed While Others Fail

Last year, at the Chick-fil-A Leadercast, I had the privilege of interviewing Jim Collins, author of the mega-bestselling business book, Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap … and Others Don’t. Since he is so research-driven in his approach, I expected him to be dry and academic. However, I found him surprisingly passionate and engaging.

In this 10-minute interview, I talked to him about his most recent book, How the Mighty Fall: And Why Some Companies Never Give In. I asked him five questions:

  1. In the book, you talk about “markers” that demonstrate when a company is moving into “Hubris Born of Success” (chapter 1 in the book). Are there also markers that demonstrate when an individual is moving into ego?
  2. If humility is so critical to sustained success, what happens if an organization’s primary leader doesn’t have it? Can the organization succeed or is it doomed?
  3. Can a company diagnose itself in terms of the five stages of decline or does it take someone from outside the organization to do it?
  4. Since greatness can be twenty or so years in the making, what are the markers that tell you whether or not you are on-track?
  5. How do leaders help their organizations acknowledge progress, so they keep getting more of the behaviors that lead to sustained success?

This year’s Chick-fil-A Leadercast promises to be the best yet. It will be held live in Atlanta next week on May 6. It’s not too late to participate. This year’s speaker list is amazing. It includes:

  • Muhtar Kent, CEO of Coca-Cola
  • John C. Maxwell, Bestselling Author
  • Seth Godin, Bestselling Author
  • Mack Brown, Head Coach of the Texas Longhorns
  • Dave Ramsey, Radio Talk Show Host
  • Erin Gruwell, Founder of Freedom Writers Foundation
  • Dan Cathy, President & COO of Chick-fil-A
  • Sir Ken Robinson, Bestselling Author

You can attend the live event in Atlanta or attend a simulcast of the event in your own city. For example, in Nashville, where I live, you can attend the simulcast at Oasis Church.

I will again be hosting the backstage interviews with all the speakers for the event. I hope to see you there.

Question: What are some of the reasons you think some organizations succeed while others fail? You can leave a comment by clicking here.
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  • Karl Mealor

    I remember reading Rick Pitino’s book “Success is a Choice”. The day after his KY team won a national championship, he had his staff meet at 8 A.M. to discuss why there were so few repeat champions. The tendency is to rest on our laurels instead of doing those things which caused us to be successful in the first place.

    • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

      Thanks for suggesting Karl! I will be looking for that.

  • http://gregoryherman.net/ Gregory R Herman

    I love Collins’ books. I have yet to read How the Mighty Fall. Good to Great has countless applications not only in business but in life, career, athletics, etc – it is a must read. Very cool interview. Thanks for sharing.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      You’ll find those same kinds of applications in How the Mighty Fall. Thanks.

    • Karl Mealor

      I’m almost afraid to admit this in this venue, but I’ve never read a book by Collins. Any suggestions as to which one I should read first?

      • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

        I would start with Good to Great.

        • Karl Mealor

          Just ordered it! Thanks.

  • Jennifer

    I saw Jim speak at the Global Leadership Summit last year. I found him fascinating.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      I love how data-driven he is. Fascinating.

      • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

        Data-driven! That’s amazing! Very rare to find people like that

      • Mohd Shahnawaz

        Micheal, though I love the fact data can be great and analysis can be too, Jim presented the facts as if to say if one follows the advice in his book “good to great” they will be great too which has been debunked by book Halo Effect.

        Companies like Semco, Nucor, Goretex etc, the founders did not have MBA but they made sure they made great culture within the company rather than pure financial analysis and treating human beings like machines.

  • http://www.leahadams.org Leah Adams

    One reason I think some organizations succeed while others fail is vision and the ability to effectively communicate that vision to others in the organization. Also the ability to motivate people to get on board with the vision.

    • Joe Lalonde

      Leah, that sounds like a very valid reason. I think one step further is that some organizations fail at getting others in their organization to catch the vision. Knowing the vision and catching the vision can be two different things.

    • http://joeandancy.com Joe Abraham

      That’s true. Some leaders are truly good in carrying out the vision. But they fail miserably in making others carry it out. Leaders must learn to possess and apply these essential qualities you mentioned besides doing a commendable job.

    • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

      Agreed Leah! I have seen many successful leaders getting on board people with the same vision.

  • Learning Catalyst

    I am working on my MA in Leadership and have spent the last week on my literature review on organizational change. Based on my reading, I would say that organizations fail because they don’t consider the whole system when they launch a change initiative. Peter Block, Peter Senge and Robert Kegan & Lisa Laskow Lahey do an excellent job at looking at some of the barriers to change.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      This is so true. They often don’t consider the full context.

    • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

      That’s true! People who resist change are bound to fail. 

  • http://twitter.com/sarahmaewrites Sarah Mae

    I am so glad there are people out there who “love” data!

    The underlying “why” and owning your own reasons…YES! I’ve been learning this lately and it is so true.

    I think companies fail when they stay stagnant, when they aren’t willing to change or update. Also, pride, like he said. When he talked about companies feeling like some “luck” may be involved in their success, what I heard was, the best companies are humble.

    Thank you for this interview – so good!

    • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

      A company which fails to accept the new emerging realities and change itself normally fails.

  • http://www.releasersofdestiny.org Releasers

    It seems that success rests on blending clear vision with relentless attention to the details of metrics; the art of looking closely while looking forward leads to success. Looking back or failing to look around both lead to failure.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      I often express it as vision and execution: the twin engines of success. You can’t succeed with only one.

      • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

        Agreed Mike! Execution is where many organizations fail these days.

  • Tim Miller

    I think many organizations (including churches) fail because they forget that their task is not taking care of themselves, it is taking care of their new and potential customers.

    • http://joeandancy.com Joe Abraham

      I totally agree with this.

    • Joe Lalonde

      I believe that is true too!

    • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

      It happens Tim! And, many do not realize thier mistakes on this count.

  • Pam Cain

    Too many companies are caught in the tyranny of the urgent taking the time to step back often enough and look at the larger picture….a lack of vision and goals. I’m so looking forward to the leadership conference next week!

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Me, too!

    • Joe Lalonde

      Pam, enjoy it! It looks like it will be a great one. Wish I had time to take off of work to attend.

    • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

      Pam! That’s like misssing the woods for the trees.

  • Oleg Sinitsin

    Integrity is key. Integrity that spreads outward towards customers and inward towards employees. Doing the right thing and doing it consistently is a sign of a great organizational culture.

    • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

      When integrity is gone, we lose the backbone

  • http://successbeginstoday.org/wordpress John Richardson

    I think a great analogy to business is a small group. Whether it be a small home group at church or a small club or organization such as Rotary or Toastmasters, the secret to sustained growth is three fold.
    1. The group needs leaders that are willing to take on different tasks and share responsibilities. It’s always tragic to me when a great group disintegrates when one leader leaves. This can be mitigated with training and shared responsibilities.

    2. The group needs a vision that is shared among its members. This is where communication comes in. Everyone needs to know the vision and be working towards a common goal.

    3. Have an open door policy. The one common denominator is change. A group is healthy only if the door is left open and new people are encouraged to come. A closed door group is like the dead sea. It will die quickly. In business, new ideas and innovation are key. If these are not encouraged and voices heard from the ground floor up, the business will die.

    I’ve been blessed to be a part of a Toastmasters group that has flourished for years. While the faces have changed over time, the group stays healthy with a common vision and shared responsibilities. Having an open door policy has brought some of the most amazing and diverse people together in a common bond. Having an outward view and asking, “How can we help,” has kept this group focused on growth and sustainability.

    • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

      Dynamism and open door policy work wonders in an organization.

  • Rick Alvey

    I believe a major reason that organizations fail rather than succeed is a lack of passion to be constantly learning and growing.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      True. I also think this kind of culture is created by the behavior of its leaders.

    • http://twitter.com/BobEwoldt Robert Ewoldt

      This is absolutely generated from the top down. If the leadership isn’t excited about learning and growing, the organization stagnates. I’ve seen this at the company I work at; under an old CEO, there was no push for learning and growing, so it never happened, and I think this was reflected in the company performance. Under the new CEO, things are changing; there’s more of a focus on employee development.

      • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

        That’s true Robert! I agree with you. Many times the leader raises the bar and increases the expectation.

    • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

      Lack of passion… That could be a crime 

  • Joe Lalonde

    Great question Michael! It makes me think of Circuit City. I think one of the reasons some companies fail is due to trying to please the stockholders instead of the customer and employees. I remember working there from 2000-2003 and it started off as a great place to work. Gradually things started to change. It started with them doing away with commissions. Those were a great incentive to help the customer find items that they needed. With those gone, those driven by increasing their wage lost their drive. Then they let go of those that were earning the most. These tended to be the most helpful and knowledgeable employees who engaged their customers, educated the customer, and made them feel welcome. With the firing of those employees, they brought in under-performing new employees. From there it was just a downward spiral. I think organizations need to keep a focus on helping customers and fostering good working conditions.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      I have seen this exact same scenario many times.

    • http://twitter.com/BobEwoldt Robert Ewoldt

      You’re right that a company cannot neglect its employees and customers for the sake of the shareholders. However, a company also cannot neglect its shareholders. Good companies are those that strike a balance between the three–customers, employees, and shareholders.

      • Joe Lalonde

        Robert, that’s true too. They need to remember the shareholders in addition to the customer and employees. The balance you talk about is rarely ever achieved. I’ve seen too many times higher profits come at the expense of customer service and employee working conditions.

        • http://twitter.com/BobEwoldt Robert Ewoldt

          I agree. I think you more often find the top executives trying to please the shareholders rather than their customers or employees.

          • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

            I wrote about this recently. I think the priority needs to employees, customers, and then shareholders. As I said in that post, “Happy employees make for happy customers. Happy customers make for happy investors. And happy investors make for happy CEOs.”

          • Joe Lalonde

            That is so very true Michael! When I worked retail, I know there were days I was unhappy due to management and corporate decisions and my service to the customer suffered. And that probably affected the bottom line of the company and shareholders.

            It is sad to me that the people that interact with the customers are often treated the worst by the management of an organization. It seems that they are seen as being at the bottom of the ladder and having little value. If only management knew the value those employees have.

  • http://twitter.com/BobEwoldt Robert Ewoldt

    I love this idea that even if a CEO isn’t taking the lead, there are those within the organization that can create pockets of greatness, and eventually that can permeate the entire organization.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      I liked that aspect of the interview, too.

  • Randy Kinnick

    I first say Jim Collins at Catalyst ’08 and was blown away by his “Good to Great” and getting the right people on the bus. Great interview…thanks for sharing.

    • http://twitter.com/BobEwoldt Robert Ewoldt

      This was the first time I’ve actually heard Jim Collins speak; I’ve heard his name before (in regards to his books), but I’ve never heard his passionate speaking. It set me on a mission to find some more audio/video to watch of him. I found a good one on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubXHjs8XQ3M

    • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

      Me too Randy!
       

  • Anonymous

    I’m not sure what you are calling success and failure. I look at companies like Xerox, IBM or Kodak who at one time were giants but now are just kinda there. I think Xerox failed to see the potential of personal computing which is why it sold it’s rights to their alto GUI computer to Steve Jobs. Jobs is quoted as saying “they had no idea what had”. Kodak didn’t see the signs that film was a dying medium fast enough and slowly adopted digital. IBM I think is more known for research rather than computers or any other machine (except Wally the computer that competed on Jeopardy).

    Then I wonder about companies like Heinz? Other than the inverted bottle what new innovation have they come out with in the past 30 years maybe – ketchup packets & plastic bottles? Does it really take a genius to run a company by raising the price of ketchup every year? They are succeeding. I’m sure they do more than ketchup, but you get my point.

    When the leaders of companies fail to see the changes in the world and how it affects their business, they become irrelevant.

    • http://twitter.com/BobEwoldt Robert Ewoldt

      Good points. IBM has been trying to reinvent itself for the last few years as a consulting company, after selling it’s PC hardware division to Lenovo. As far as I know, they’ve been doing pretty well, actually. They’ve successfully re-engineered their business model, and they got out of a business space that was getting crowded and into another one that is now booming!

    • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

      Adapting to the changing world is really one key component to success. Failing to read the change often leads to the fall

  • Lynette Sowell

    I believe if an organization thinks small, it will stay small. I was involved in the leadership of an organization that was on the small side, and because it kept operating small it has remained small, and I think in the next ten years, it will cease to exist if they don’t change that. A year ago, I left that group and it was one of the best decisions I’ve ever made.

    Also, if there’s not a constant or regular reevaluation of what is and isn’t working–and being willing to admit that what a leader or group is doing doesn’t work. I think that’s what you meant when you talked about leaders having humility. I have seen that in churches as well–a constant repetition of something that doesn’t work with continued “prayers” against “attacks of the enemy.” The answer actually lies in being open to change and looking ahead. All the good intentions of having a vision won’t come about if there are no goals and a willingness to change.

    • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

      That’s true! I have seen this many times in my life.

  • http://trafficcoleman.com/blog/official-black-seo-guy/ Black Seo Guy

    Marketing is the key to everything..once they master this then the rest comes..but you must know how to track track down your audience..

    “Black Seo Guy “Signing Off”

    • http://twitter.com/BobEwoldt Robert Ewoldt

      Marketing is a key thing, but it’s not the only thing; marketing is nothing if you don’t have a good product. If you don’t have a good product, your sales will eventually diminish. Perhaps then you’ll have made the profit that you want, but you won’t have any reputation.

    • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

      Marketing is key to something but not everything…. atleast in my opinion 

  • http://joeandancy.com Joe Abraham

    This interview was quite interesting.

    One of the major reasons which I found that leads to organizational failure is that the leader fails to keep growing up to make his organization grow up. In the initial stage, he (or she) was quite capable. That brought in momentum and productivity. But he didn’t keep learning the trade. So slowly but steadily, the system started floating down. First it wasn’t noticeable; but it became obvious shortly.

    But the good news is that he can turn the tide if he will do now what he should have done earlier when the downfall slowly began: get ready to grow up, personally.

    • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

      I love that advice guest 

  • Dennis L Preston

    While in business school, we watched a video of the CEO of Johnson & Johnson discuss the company, where it had been, & where it was, & where it was going. If you didn’t know the name of the company, & were just brought in to listen to this particular CEO, you would have thought he was leading a failing company by how he spoke. Not one iota of “we’re so great, we’ve always been great, we’ll always be great.” He really seemed to have taken to heart Jack Welch’s adage (I believe before Jack had spoken it) of “when the rate of change outside an organization is greater than the rate of change inside an organization, the failure of that organization is imminent.” Very fascinating, and very much against what seems to be the pop notion of once you’re at the top, you’ll always be at the top.

    Thanks Michael for this forum.

    • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

       “when the rate of change outside an organization is greater than the rate of change inside an organization, the failure of that organization is imminent.” — I love that quote Dennis. Thank you. 

  • http://www.jeremysconfessions.com Jeremy’s Confessions

    I have read a statistics book to fall asleep. Have not read Jim’s book, but it is on my shelf just waiting.

    • http://twitter.com/BobEwoldt Robert Ewoldt

      I would love to read some of Jim’s books; I’m reading a lot more now that I have a Kindle. I was watching a different Jim Collins video today, and he said that Rick Warren reads a book EVERY DAY (this was in the context of an exhortation to make whitespace in our days to have time to think). Isn’t that amazing?

      • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

        I think Hank Hanegraaff does the same.

  • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

    When an organization fails to restrain itself from unethical actions, I think it is doomed for failure at any point of time. Recent economic recession across the world proved a point that many organizations collapsed due to its own unethical practices.

    Second, when an organization fails to wake up to the current market reality and developments, I feel it will become redundant gradually.

    • http://twitter.com/BobEwoldt Robert Ewoldt

      I agree… I think that integrity and humility are the cornerstones of a good company. When you fail to have either, your company becomes unsustainable.

      • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

        Thanks Robert. You are welcome.

  • http://heartpress.com/ SL Clark

    Many organizations fail because they don’t show up. They are not actively seeking Win-Win.

    For instance, the Leadership cast seems awesome; even though I don’t know what it costs to host a location. I sent the suggestion to two large churches on Oahu. Nobody took the time to craft a basic reply, much less make this happen in the community. I also sent the suggestion to a well known social media activist who has access to a conference room. She failed to write back as well, denying her company the opportunity.

    Currently, I still have a 2,407 mile swim to the nearest location. There isn’t a single location in the Hawaiian Islands acting as a host. I’m crushed. Too much hang loose surfing and not enough leaders. Failures all around.

    • Karl Mealor

      The bad news is…you’re in Hawaii??? Some of us are more than a little jealous. Like me, for instance. :-)

      • Karl Mealor

        Actually, SL, I feel your pain. A site is less than two miles from where I’m sitting, but I’m unable to attend because of a previous commitment (wedding).

    • http://www.tnealtarver.wordpress.com TNeal

      Wow! I guess that shoots the Hawaiian paradise dream to pieces.

    • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

      “Many organizations fail because they don’t show up. They are not actively seeking Win-Win. ” — I agree Clark!
       

  • http://www.tnealtarver.wordpress.com TNeal

    I think the biblical adage, “people without a vision perish,” holds true for companies as well as churches or nations. Vision helps you steer a course and keeps a person/company on track. Lack of vision causes forward movement to stall or cease altogether. After all, if you don’t know where you’re going, you have no enthusiasm for the journey.

    • http://stevencribbs.com Steven Cribbs

      I totally agree. And then comes the challenge of communicating the vision and getting others to take the vision on as their own.

  • http://www.tnealtarver.wordpress.com TNeal

    I thought this video would miss me completely. I’m not leading a company or working in a company. But Jim’s first question in any assessment-“What are the brutal facts?”-is one worth remembering. It gives a starting place for genuine reflection as to where I am in a project or in my life in general. Surprising post!

    • http://stevencribbs.com Steven Cribbs

      And then asking the question of “why?” Why did this happen, why was there success or failure. Taking the time to reflect is important.

      And I liked what Jim said at the end about looking at the indicators throughout the process and not just waiting till the end to get the test results.

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      This is a great question, isn’t it? I want to use this with consulting clients. It’s a great place to start!

  • Jmhardy97

    I think two reasons, first you have to have the drive and not settle in order to repeat. The second reason is that when organizations become large, it is hard for them to take chances. They are always just trying to maintain. Large companies need to make mistakes and take chances if they want to grow and succeed.

    • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

      Yes! calculated risk should be there. 

  • http://stevencribbs.com Steven Cribbs

    I think some companies fail because they try to be all things to all people instead of focusing on what they are truly good at.

    Also, some companies fail because they focus on themselves instead of their customers – the customer’s needs and serving them well.

    • http://twitter.com/BobEwoldt Robert Ewoldt

      Or, they spend too much time with customers that bring them nothing but headaches. There was a post here a few weeks ago with Seth Godin where Godin says that companies need to fire their worst customers, so that they have time to spend on the customers that actually bring them goodness.

      • http://stevencribbs.com Steven Cribbs

        My company has experienced this – where we have spent so much time trying to solve one customer’s issues that other customers, and our own product development, have suffered more than what they should have. It is a difficult balance at times and it can be hard to say when it is the right time to cut off a customer.

      • Dan Greegor

        I totally agree. How much is wasted on customers that will bring little to no return but demand the world of you?

  • http://www.learninginthegripofgrace.com Hans

    Michael, what do you think is the best way for a leader to cultivate humility?

    Thanks,
    Hans

    http://www.learninginthegripofgrace.com

    • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

      Prayer and the fear of God.

    • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

      Thanks for sharing the blog! I like that Hans 

  • Jmhardy97

    Jim makes data so understanding. He has such great ideas.

  • Anonymous

    Good to Great was definitely a game-changer. The language he applies to great companies, including getting team members into “the right seat,” made its way into my lexicon and practice. It’s guided teacher assignments even at our growing K-6 school.

  • oodihi

    I really enjoyed this interview and his explanation of how hubris plays a role in failure and humility/ the belief that part of one’s success is luck can be beneficial in the long run. This has applications in all facets of life. I see that in school as a grad student where the “smartest” people are the ones who think they aren’t and are so afraid to fail that they work harder than those who think they are smart. Thanks also for sharing the info on the Chick-Fil-A Leadercast!

    • http://twitter.com/BobEwoldt Robert Ewoldt

      It was interesting to hear Jim talk about how humility is the #1 characteristic of a Level 5 leader.

      • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

        I thought that was interesting, too.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_FJRLITL5IEFHDDFURAESLXOOZ4 Jim Whitaker

        Great point and a characteristic that is often not scene in top leaders.

      • Dan Greegor

        Too bad more don’t exercise this virtue

    • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

      Thanks for sharing your school experience. I have too sailed in the same boat. 

  • http://christianray.myopenid.com/ Christian Ray

    Good insights. “How can I make this not about me?” is the key question. I think I’ll repost this on The Third Drive (www.christianrayflores.com)

  • Dan Greegor

    Vision. Everything rises and falls on vision. Some companies have long range vision while some prefer to stay stagnant.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_FJRLITL5IEFHDDFURAESLXOOZ4 Jim Whitaker

    I have seen Jim speak twice at conferences and he is great. I think that culture and change are the biggest issues for companies success or failure. If there is a clear culture that is translated from top to bottom that folks buy into then it is easy for companies to succeed and do well. Especially if the culture has points of emphasis that employees can rally around such as remarkable customer service, integrity, transparency, and embracing differences and leveraging them to make the company better. However that also means that a company has to have the ability to change and change quickly. That is not so easy for large Fortune 500 companies, but more and more they need to be able to look at the evolving marketplace and find ways to fit into the change culture and models that are out there. If you can’t sell wood anymore, maybe you sell phones. If you can just sell products, you sell services and vice versa. Finding new ways to be relevant in a changing world is more and more important for companies to succeed.

    • Jmhardy97

      Jim,

      I agree. Culture can help success endure even after a founder is gone.

    • http://twitter.com/BobEwoldt Robert Ewoldt

      I’ve only watched videos of Jim, and it seems he has tremendous passion for what he talks about.

  • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

    I love How the Mighty Fall and agree with all of Collins’ points, particularly “hubris born of success.” I’ve seen this happen in a lot of ministries — you get blessed, get cocky and neglect the importance of staying nimble to continue growing.

    • Jmhardy97

      Jeff,

      I just read inboard by Howard Schultz of Starbucks and he would echo your exact comments. You have to stay innovative, creative and stay small even when you become big.

      • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

        cool. i may have to check that book out. looks interesting.

      • http://michaelhyatt.com Michael Hyatt

        I really want to read that book. I think Shultz has a unique perspective, having been the CEO, then leaving, then coming back.

      • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

        Thanks Hardy for the book. I am taking that to my ‘to-reads’ list. 

    • http://uma-maheswaran.blogspot.com/ Uma Maheswaran S

      Failing to pass the baton at right time also creates the havoc. 

  • Melissa – Mel’s World

    Great interview…love his enthusiasm, it’s truly contagious!

  • http://www.adonislenzy.com Adonis Lenzy

    Great video. Thanks for sharing.

  • http://www.forward-living.com W. Mark Thompson

    Enjoyed that video. Good to be able to put a personality with the face and name. Great interview!

  • Mohd Shahnawaz

    good to great read the book turn to last page and read the company list you will find most of the so called great companies are either bankrupt or not “great” anymore.