5 Reasons Why People are Unproductive at Work

What Organizations Must Learn From the Disconnect

Take a guess: What portion of the American workforce said they were “most productive” at the office during normal work hours? According to a recent FlexJobs survey, the number could be as low as 7 percent. Many more said they get some things done at the office “because it’s not an option to leave.”

Whatever the number of highly focused workers is, it’s too low. In the massive State of the American Workplace report, Gallup found that only 33 percent of workers are significantly engaged at work.

And a smaller but more troubling number of workers are “actively disengaged,” meaning they “are miserable in the workplace and destroy what the most engaged employees build.” As for the other 51 percent, Gallup found “[they] are not engaged—they’re just there.”

Don’t Want It? Get Rid of It!

3 Ways to Let Go and Find What You’ve Been Missing

I spent an afternoon last week cleaning out my closet. It was high time I did. I had shirts, pants, shoes, and hats that I had not worn in months—in some cases, years. When I thought about it after, the whole experience became a kind of a metaphor for improvement.

It occurred to me that if we want more of what we want, we have to get rid of what we don’t want. It’s the necessary but sometimes painful process called pruning.

4 Ways to Stay Positive in Work and Life

A Former Pessimist Shares His Secrets to Success

We often assume that people simply are a certain way. “She’s such a bright, sunny person.” “He’s always such a gloomy Gus.” Nature gives us optimists and pessimists, and that’s all there is to it.

But according to Jon Gordon, that’s a myth, a limiting belief that may be holding you back. He says this from painful first-hand experience.

Why I Broke Up with Slack—And Went Back

The 3 Changes that Made It Work for Me and My Team Again

My team and I have been using Slack as our primary communication platform since June 2014. As we grew, email became unmanageable and other solutions like Basecamp weren’t a fit. After a full-immersion trial, we were sold!

But then we unsold ourselves. It took three years. But, just as email didn’t scale with our growth, neither did Slack.

One Simple Trick to Bring Out the Best in People

How Leading with Positive Expectations Can Work for You

Winston Lord is a former ambassador to China who once wrote speeches for Henry Kissinger. Looking back, he said he couldn’t “recommend that to anybody.” Why? “You’d have to go through about 20 drafts and many insults before you got to the final speech.”

In one outrageous but true example, Lord took Kissinger a draft of a speech. Kissinger called him into his office the next day. “Is this the best you can do?” he asked. “Henry, I thought so,” Lord answered, “but I’ll try again.”

Next draft—same response. Back to drawing board again … and again … and again. The back-and-forth went on until the ninth draft, when Lord’s patience finally snapped.

When Delegation Becomes Abdication

3 Reasons Your Leadership Doesn’t Get the Results You Want

Tell me you’ve had this experience. You assign a task but then forget about it. I sure have. As a leader, I am not a micromanager. That’s good news for my team. But I have to be intentional that delegation doesn’t drift into abdication.

It’s not always disastrous when this happens. If we’ve hired well, our teams bridge the gap and nobody is worse off. But sometimes when assignments fall through the cracks, we create serious problems for ourselves.

I know better, but this happened to me recently.

Let Me Be Your Coach in 2018

Join Me in Nashville for the Best Year Ever Live! Event

Earlier this year we did something exciting. I’d hosted a conference for Platform University before. But January 2017 was the first time we’d ever hosted a live version of my popular 5 Days to Your Best Year Ever goal-achievement course.

It was a blast! But there was a problem. It was well into fall when we decided to do the event. And we didn’t announce it until registration opened for the course in December. You can probably guess the problem.

How Introverts and Extroverts Can Get Along

3 Things We Both Need to Know to Make It Work

Sometimes I think that introverts and extroverts are from different planets, and I am not alone in picturing it that way.

Quiet Revolution co-founder Susan Cain calls the distance from introversion to extroversion the “single most important aspect of personality.” One leading scientist calls it the “north and south of temperament.”

We Just Made the Inc. 5000… Because of You

3 Reasons Why Your Growth Fueled Ours

I’m excited to announce that Michael Hyatt & Company was just named to the Inc. 5000, which ranks America’s fastest-growing private companies. The accomplishment not only makes me feel proud of our work, it makes me feel grateful for you: our readers and customers.

To compile the list, Inc. magazine tracks three-years’ worth of growth. Over those three years, Michael Hyatt & Company grew 330 percent. We’re ranked 1,235 out of 5,000 who made the list. There are about 26 million businesses in America, so that’s quite an achievement. And we owe it to you.

What to Do When You Are Forced to Wait

5 Strategies When Patience Doesn't Come Easy

I am good at a few things. But waiting is not one of them. Whether it’s being put on hold when I call a business, sitting in the waiting room of my dentist’s office, or standing in the airport security line, I am impatient.

Thinking about this, I was reminded of a time when my granddaughter, Libby, landed in the emergency room. She had been showing strange symptoms for a couple of years. Finally, after Libby got violently sick, my daughter, Mindy, took her to the emergency room.

13 Ways to Make Your Employees Pull Their Hair Out

How Horrible Bosses Can Make Workers Miserable

Over my career, I’ve had more bad bosses than good ones. You probably have, too. At some point along the way, I realized that studying them could give me a valuable education in what not to do. I started taking notes.

My employees over the years have benefited from my observations of poor leadership in action. In management, knowing what not to do can be just as important as knowing what to do.